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1 - 10 of 17 results for: CARDCOURSES::humanrights

AMSTUD 150X: From Gold Rush to Google Bus: History of San Francisco (HISTORY 252E, URBANST 150)

This class will examine the history of San Francisco from Native American and colonial settlement through the present. Focus is on social, environmental, and political history, with the theme of power in the city. Topics include Native Americans, the Gold Rush, immigration and nativism, railroads and robber barons, earthquake and fire, progressive reform and unionism, gender, race and civil rights, sexuality and politics, counterculture, redevelopment and gentrification. Students write final project in collaboration with ShapingSF, a participatory community history project documenting and archiving overlooked stories and memories of San Francisco. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: not given next year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ASNAMST 123: Asian Americans and Environmental Justice (EARTHSYS 123)

One central tenet of the environmental justice movement is centering the leadership of frontline communities. Unfortunately, the struggles of Asian Americans on the frontlines of corporate environmental pollution and extraction are less visible and less well-known. In this course, we will explore the Asian American voices that have contributed to the development of the environmental justice movement and the leadership that is shaping the future of this movement.nThis course is designed to provide students with education about the history of the environmental justice movement, the future being envisioned, and the strategies that are needed to get to the vision. It will draw on lectures, readings, guest presentations, case studies, and the instructor's more than 15 years of experience with organizing and social justice campaigns. Students will learn about the principles guiding the environmental justice movement; the vision and framework of how we achieve a just transition to a regenerative economy; the process of organizing and campaign work to advance a community agenda; and skills in collecting, analyzing, and communicating information.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CHPR 223: Obesity in America: Clinical and Public Health Implications (HUMBIO 123)

Interdisciplinary clinical, research, and policy approaches. The prevalence, predictors, and consequences of obesity and diabetes; biological and physiological mechanisms; clinical treatments including medications and surgery; and the relevance of behavioral, environmental, economic, and policy approaches to obesity prevention and control. Undergraduate prerequisite: Human Biology core or equivalent, or consent of instructor. HumBio students must enroll in HumBio 123. CHPR Master's students who are not medical students enroll in CHPR 223 for a letter grade. Priority for enrollment given to CHPR master's students.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

CSRE 150B: RACE AND CRIME PRACTICUM (PSYCH 150B)

This practicum is designed to build on the lessons learned in Psych 150: Race & Crime. In this community service learning course, students will participate in community partnerships relevant to race and crime, as well as reflection to connect these experiences to research and course content. Interested students should complete an application for permission at: https://goo.gl/forms/CAut7RKX6MewBIuG3. nnPrerequisite: Psych 150 (taken concurrently or previously).
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 123: Asian Americans and Environmental Justice (ASNAMST 123)

One central tenet of the environmental justice movement is centering the leadership of frontline communities. Unfortunately, the struggles of Asian Americans on the frontlines of corporate environmental pollution and extraction are less visible and less well-known. In this course, we will explore the Asian American voices that have contributed to the development of the environmental justice movement and the leadership that is shaping the future of this movement.nThis course is designed to provide students with education about the history of the environmental justice movement, the future being envisioned, and the strategies that are needed to get to the vision. It will draw on lectures, readings, guest presentations, case studies, and the instructor's more than 15 years of experience with organizing and social justice campaigns. Students will learn about the principles guiding the environmental justice movement; the vision and framework of how we achieve a just transition to a regenerative economy; the process of organizing and campaign work to advance a community agenda; and skills in collecting, analyzing, and communicating information.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

FRENLANG 23C: Second-Year French: Cultural Emphasis, Third Quarter

Continuation of FRENLANG 22C. Sequence integrating culture and language. Emphasis is on advanced proficiency in oral and written discourse including presentational language and socio culturally appropriate discourse in formal and informal, academic, and professional contexts. Prerequisite: placement Test, FRENLANG 22C.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 136: Refugees, Politics and Culture in Contemporary Germany (COMPLIT 136, COMPLIT 336A, GERMAN 336)

Responses to refugees and immigration to Germany against the backdrop of German history and in the context of domestic and European politics. Topics include: cultural difference and integration processes, gender roles, religious traditions, populism and neo-nationalism. Reading knowledge of German, another European language, or an immigrant language will be useful for research projects, but not required.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Berman, R. (PI)

GERMAN 336: Refugees, Politics and Culture in Contemporary Germany (COMPLIT 136, COMPLIT 336A, GERMAN 136)

Responses to refugees and immigration to Germany against the backdrop of German history and in the context of domestic and European politics. Topics include: cultural difference and integration processes, gender roles, religious traditions, populism and neo-nationalism. Reading knowledge of German, another European language, or an immigrant language will be useful for research projects, but not required.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Berman, R. (PI)

HUMBIO 123: Obesity in America: Clinical and Public Health Implications (CHPR 223)

Interdisciplinary clinical, research, and policy approaches. The prevalence, predictors, and consequences of obesity and diabetes; biological and physiological mechanisms; clinical treatments including medications and surgery; and the relevance of behavioral, environmental, economic, and policy approaches to obesity prevention and control. Undergraduate prerequisite: Human Biology core or equivalent, or consent of instructor. HumBio students must enroll in HumBio 123. CHPR Master's students who are not medical students enroll in CHPR 223 for a letter grade. Priority for enrollment given to CHPR master's students.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

HUMRTS 104: Introduction to Disability Studies and Disability Rights (ETHICSOC 104X, FEMGEN 94H, SOC 186)

Disability Studies is a relatively new interdisciplinary academic field that examines disability as a social, cultural and political phenomenon. This is an introductory course to the field of disability studies and it aims to investigate the complex concept of disability through a variety of prisms and disciplines including social psychology, the humanities, legal studies and media studies. This course also focuses on the multiple connections between the study of disability and other identities including class, race, ethnicity, gender and sexual orientation, and also includes a comparative look at how disability is treated across cultures. Some of the topics covered in the class are disability and the family, the history of the disability rights movement, the development of disability identity and its intersectionality, antidiscrimination law, the UN Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities, bioethical dilemmas pertaining to disability and more.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Dorfman, D. (PI)
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