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1 - 10 of 24 results for: CARDCOURSES::general ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

AFRICAST 142: Challenging the Status Quo: Social Entrepreneurs Advancing Democracy, Development and Justice (AFRICAST 242, INTNLREL 142)

This seminar is part of a broader program on Social Entrepreneurship at CDDRL in partnership with the Haas Center for Public Service. It will use practice to better inform theory. Working with three visiting social entrepreneurs from developing and developed country contexts students will use case studies of successful and failed social change strategies to explore relationships between social entrepreneurship, gender, democracy, development and justice. It interrogates current definitions of democracy and development and explores how they can become more inclusive of marginalized populations. This is a service learning class in which students will learn by working on projects that support the social entrepreneurs' efforts to promote social change. Students should register for either 3 OR 5 units only. Students enrolled in the full 5 units will have a service-learning component along with the course. Students enrolled for 3 units will not complete the service-learning component. Limited enrollment. Attendance at the first class is mandatory in order to participate in service learning.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Kelly, K. (PI)

COMM 138: Deliberative Democracy Practicum: Applying Deliberative Polling (COMM 238, CSRE 38)

In this course, students will work directly on a real-world deliberative democracy project using the method of Deliberative Polling. Students in this course will work in partnership with the Center for Deliberative Democracy at Stanford, a research center devoted to the research in democracy and public opinion around the world. This unique practicum will allow students to work on an actual Deliberative Polling project on campus. In just one quarter, the students will prepare for, implement, and analyze the results for an Deliberative Polling project. This is a unique opportunity that allows students to take part in the entire process of a deliberative democracy project. Through this practicum, students will apply quantitative and qualitative research methods in a local community or local high school and subsequently, analyze the relevant quantitative and qualitative data. Students will explore the underlying challenges and complexities of what it means to actually do community-engaged research in the real world. As such, this course will provide students with skills and experience in research design in deliberative democracy, community and stakeholder engagement, and the practical aspects of working in local communities. This practicum is a collaboration between the Center for Deliberative Democracy, the Bill Lane Center for the American West and the Haas Center for Public Service.nnCDD website: http://cdd.stanford.edunBill Lane Center website: http://west.stanford.edunHass Center website: https://haas.stanford.edu
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Siu, A. (PI)

CSRE 38: Deliberative Democracy Practicum: Applying Deliberative Polling (COMM 138, COMM 238)

In this course, students will work directly on a real-world deliberative democracy project using the method of Deliberative Polling. Students in this course will work in partnership with the Center for Deliberative Democracy at Stanford, a research center devoted to the research in democracy and public opinion around the world. This unique practicum will allow students to work on an actual Deliberative Polling project on campus. In just one quarter, the students will prepare for, implement, and analyze the results for an Deliberative Polling project. This is a unique opportunity that allows students to take part in the entire process of a deliberative democracy project. Through this practicum, students will apply quantitative and qualitative research methods in a local community or local high school and subsequently, analyze the relevant quantitative and qualitative data. Students will explore the underlying challenges and complexities of what it means to actually do community-engaged research in the real world. As such, this course will provide students with skills and experience in research design in deliberative democracy, community and stakeholder engagement, and the practical aspects of working in local communities. This practicum is a collaboration between the Center for Deliberative Democracy, the Bill Lane Center for the American West and the Haas Center for Public Service.nnCDD website: http://cdd.stanford.edunBill Lane Center website: http://west.stanford.edunHass Center website: https://haas.stanford.edu
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Siu, A. (PI)

CSRE 141: Gentrification (URBANST 141)

Neighborhoods in the Bay Area and around the world are undergoing a transformation known as gentrification. Middle- and upper-income people are moving into what were once low-income areas, and housing costs are on the rise. Tensions between ¿newcomers¿ and ¿old timers,¿ who are often separated by race, ethnicity, or sexual orientation, can erupt; high rents may force long-time residents to leave. In this class we will move beyond simplistic media depictions to explore the complex history, nature, causes and consequences of this process. Students will learn through readings, films, class discussions, and engagement with a local community organization
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Kahan, M. (PI)

DANCE 197: Dance in Prison: The Arts, Juvenile Justice, and Rehabilitation in America (TAPS 197)

This class works collaboratively with a local juvenile hall to use civic engagement and performance to explore the aesthetic, cultural and legal issues in the lives of incarcerated youth. In the process students gain an understanding of incarceration on an immediate and personal scale. Taught jointly by a Dance Studies scholar and a lawyer specializing in Juvenile Justice, we will consider what unique understandings are possible if we position the arts as central to an exploration of punishment, rehabilitation and recidivism in America. The course will examine case studies, historical and contemporary narratives about the social, imaginative and behavioral change possible through arts programs in prison.Half of the class meetings will be in Hillcrest Juvenile Hall in San Mateo, where our class will join with a group of 13-18 year old youths currently detained there. Dance will be used to help shape their individual expressive voices, and ours, through collaborative hip hop dance classes. Books to be read are Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption by Bryan Stevenson, and Last Chance in Texas by John Hubner.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Ross, J. (PI)

LAW 414E: Policy Practicum: Legal and Policy Tools for Preventing Atrocities

In 2012, at the U.S. Holocaust Museum and Memorial, President Obama announced the adoption of a comprehensive global strategy to prevent atrocities. This strategy is based on a set of recommendations generated by a comprehensive interagency review of the U.S. government's capabilities mandated by Presidential Study Directive 10 (PSD-10) of 2011. In unveiling this major new initiative, President Obama underscored that Preventing mass atrocities and genocide is a core national security interest and a core moral responsibility of the United States. Foundational to the PSD-10 recommendations was the creation of a high-level interagency Atrocities Prevention Board (APB) to monitor at-risk countries and emerging threats in order to coordinate the U.S. government's responses thereto. The National Security Staff's Senior Director for Multilateral Affairs and Human Rights convenes the APB. Since being established in 2012, the APB has worked to amass and strengthen a range of legal, diplomatic, military, rhetorical, and financial tools for atrocity prevention. Although the APB is a U.S. initiative, it also aims to build multilateral support around the imperative of prevention, working with the U.N. Office on Genocide Prevention and the Responsibility to Protect, regional organizations such as the International Conference on the Great Lakes Region, and committed partner states, such as Tanzania, Switzerland, and Argentina. The proposed policy lab would support the APB primarily through one of its constitutive entities, the Office of Global Criminal Justice (GCJ) in the U.S. Department of State. GCJ is headed by an Ambassador-at-Large (Assistant Secretary equivalent) and a Deputy (a position I held from 2012-2013) and advises the Secretary of State and the Under Secretary for Civilian Security, Democracy, and Human Rights on U.S. policy addressed to the prevention of, responses to, and accountability for mass atrocities. Additional client agencies and offices will include the Department of Justice, the National Security Council, the Department of the Treasury, the Agency for International Development (USAID), and other State Department Offices, such as the Bureau of Human Rights, Democracy & Labor and the Bureau of International Organizations. Depending on student interest, I envision the lab taking on a range of projects devoted to (a) strengthening existing tools, (b) developing new capabilities, (c) evaluating the efficacy of past efforts in order to glean lessons learned, and (d) gathering best practices from other states and entities engaged in similar endeavors, all with an eye toward developing concrete recommendations for future action. 1. Regulating the Transfer of Arms in the Service of Atrocities Prevention: In 2013, the U.N. General Assembly adopted the Arms Trade Treaty (ATT), regulating the international trade in conventional arms (which include everything from small arms to battle tanks, combat aircraft, and warships). According to Article 6(3) of the treaty, States Parties (of which there are now 40) are barred from authorizing the transfer of covered conventional weapons if officials have knowledge that the arms would be used in the commission of genocide, crimes against humanity, or war crimes. States Parties are obliged to take measures to implement the provisions of the treaty, including through an effective and transparent national control system. In September 2013, the United States signed the treaty but the President has not yet submitted it for ratification. This project would devise proposals for how states can best implement their treaty duties under Article 6(3) with an eye toward generating model regulatory language based on analogous treaty regimes. 2. Designing Commissions of Inquiry in Support of Accountability: The Under-Secretary of Civilian Security, Human Rights, and Democracy would benefit from advice on how to maximize the impact of the commissions of inquiry (COIs) that are established, usually by the Human Rights Council in Geneva but occasionally by the U.N. Security Council, to document the commission of international crimes in armed conflicts and repressive states. The project would collate the various mandates, methodologies, outcomes, and impact of prior (and current) COIs with an eye toward developing best practices and recommending ways that future COIs can be designed to better contribute to processes of accountability for the crimes they document and the perpetrators they identify. In particular, students would propose options for better leveraging lists of perpetrators for accountability purposes, such as by sharing with national immigration and prosecutorial officials. 3. According and Withholding Foreign Official Immunity: The Department of Justice (Human Rights & Special Prosecutions Unit) is keenly interested in gaining a better understanding of the principles of immunity governing foreign officials. Although they would welcome any up-to-date guidance on background legal principles, they are hoping in particular to get more clarity on the actual practice of states in claiming, and according, such immunities, including the historical practice of the United States. The research and recommendations on when the according of immunity should be resisted would inform their prosecutorial practice vis-à-vis state actors accused of the commission of international crimes as well as their negotiations with the Department of State with respect to assertions/suggestions of immunity. 4. Surveying the Efforts of Others: A number of other states, multilateral entities, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and United Nations offices are also devoted to preventing atrocities in at-risk or volatile states and to inhibiting the escalation of violence once underway. Although the APB is committed to working multilaterally, it has yet to undertake a comprehensive survey of policies developed by other governments and non-governmental entities in this regard. This project would gather this information in order to identify partnership opportunities and identify policies worthy of emulation. As with all policy labs, students would develop a more fulsome project proposal and work plan with the client entity and prepare mid-term and final reports. The proposed projects, and others that might be developed, will give students the opportunity to develop an expertise in: * elements of U.S. foreign policy, * the challenges of interagency and multilateral coordination, * the process of designing and implementing governmental aid and programming, *techniques of treaty interpretation and implementation, * the packaging legal constraints in policy terms, * developing valid metrics for evaluating successes and failures in circumstances characterized by acute uncertainty and multiple variables, and * comparative law and policy. Over the course of the semester, students should improve specific policy analysis skills (e.g., research design, data collection and analysis, and policy writing) as well as general professional skills (analytical thinking, project management, client relations, teamwork, and oral presentation). Because the APB is a new interagency initiative, with no clear precedent, the policy lab will also offer students a blue ski opportunity to think creatively about ways the U.S. government can balance the equities of its various agencies -- and inspire international partners -- to respond effectively to the pressing global challenge of preventing mass atrocities. Course must be taken for at least two units to meet "R" (Research) requirement. Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper. NOTE: Students may not count more than a combined total of eight units of directed research projects and policy lab practica toward graduation unless the additional counted units are approved in advance by the Petitions Committee. Such approval will be granted only for good cause shown. Even in the case of a successful petition for additional units, a student cannot receive a letter grade for more than eight units of independent research (Policy Lab practicum, Directed Research, Senior Thesis, and/or Research Track). Any units taken in excess of eight will be graded on a mandatory pass basis. For detailed information, see "Directed Research/Policy Labs" in the SLS Student Handbook.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 414L: Policy Practicum: Race, Gender and Prosecution

This policy practicum will focus on the gender and racial diversity of prosecutors' offices in California. Although police departments have collected and reported data on racial and gender diversity for decades, no similar information has been publicly available for prosecutors' offices, despite the longstanding belief that diversity is important for criminal justice decision makers. Recent controversies around the country about the investigation and prosecution of killings by police officers have only underscored the continued importance of attention to the role that race plays in the administration of justice in our country. This practicum builds off data collected from county prosecutors' offices in California to start a national conversation on prosecutorial diversity and how it affects decision-making and operations of justice. Students will expand the study with research on other states and/or the federal criminal justice system, organize a national roundtable to identify ways to improve staff diversity in prosecutors' offices, and conduct case studies on select California county prosecutors' offices. Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Attendance, Written Assignments. NOTE: Students may not count more than a combined total of eight units of directed research projects and policy lab practica toward graduation unless the additional counted units are approved in advance by the Petitions Committee. Such approval will be granted only for good cause shown. Even in the case of a successful petition for additional units, a student cannot receive a letter grade for more than eight units of independent research (Policy Lab practicum, Directed Research, Senior Thesis, and/or Research Track). Any units taken in excess of eight will be graded on a mandatory pass basis. For detailed information, see "Directed Research/Policy Labs" in the SLS Student Handbook.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 414P: Policy Practicum: Impact Investing In Developing Countries: Legal Institutions and Work-Arounds

What legal institutions are important to the success of businesses serving the world's poorest people, and what are feasible work-arounds when those institutions are absent? An increasing number of business enterprises in developing countries, including India and much of Africa, seek to provide health, sanitation, housing, savings, insurance, and other essential services to the very poor. But many of them operate in countries that lack stable property rights, independent judiciaries, and other elements of the "rule of law" that investors and entrepreneurs take for granted in more developed countries. We will study how entrepreneurs operate and attract investors in these situations. The first phase of the project will involve in-depth interviews with and data gathering from foundations, funds, and other institutional investors who have a sophisticated knowledge of the conditions that conduce to the success of their investee enterprises and a return on their investments. Our client will likely be a foundation or other organization making impact investments in developing countries. GSB, Political Science, and Economics students as well as Law students are welcome to participate. Elements used in grading: TBD with instructor. NOTE: Students may not count more than a combined total of eight units of directed research projects and policy lab practica toward graduation unless the additional counted units are approved in advance by the Petitions Committee. Such approval will be granted only for good cause shown. Even in the case of a successful petition for additional units, a student cannot receive a letter grade for more than eight units of independent research (Policy Lab practicum, Directed Research, Senior Thesis, and/or Research Track). Any units taken in excess of eight will be graded on a mandatory pass basis. For detailed information, see "Directed Research/Policy Labs" in the SLS Student Handbook. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and e-mail the Consent Application Form available on the SLS Registrar's Office website (see Registration and Selection of Classes for Stanford Law Students) to the instructor. See Consent Application Form for submission deadline.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
Instructors: Brest, P. (PI)

LAW 414Q: Policy Practicum: Developing a Federal Framework for Climate Change Policy

Students in this policy lab will work with the instructor, and a sponsoring foundation, to develop strategies to guide the federal government in delivering on the nation's climate change commitments. The students will focus on two major topics: (1) constructing an inventory and road map of potential carbon emissions reductions across the federal government; and (2) evaluating governing structures available to coordinate federal emissions reductions and adaptation/resilience actions across the federal government, and with the states. Elements used in grading: Written Assignments. NOTE: Students may not count more than a combined total of eight units of directed research projects and policy lab practica toward graduation unless the additional counted units are approved in advance by the Petitions Committee. Such approval will be granted only for good cause shown. Even in the case of a successful petition for additional units, a student cannot receive a letter grade for more than eight units of independent research (Policy Lab practicum, Directed Research, Senior Thesis, and/or Research Track). Any units taken in excess of eight will be graded on a mandatory pass basis. For detailed information, see "Directed Research/Policy Labs" in the SLS Student Handbook. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and e-mail the Consent Application Form available on the SLS Registrar's Office website (see Registration and Selection of Classes for Stanford Law Students) to the instructor. See Consent Application Form for submission deadline.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
Instructors: Hayes, D. (PI)

LAW 414V: Policy Practicum: Access to Justice: Legal Services Programs and Limited Advice Assistance

This course seeks to assess the effectiveness of limited advice and assistance provided to low income clients rather than full representation. Because legal services programs can represent less than a fifth of those who need their help, most offer some form of limited aid. Partnering with the national Legal Services Corporation and Alaska Legal Services, students will interview of sample of clients who received limited assistance and a sample of individuals who secured no help. The outcome of this study will help guide the decisions of legal services programs about whether to invest in limited assistance. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section 01 (3 units) into section 02 (4 units), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Elements used in grading: Interviewing skills; data analysis; written research and drafting assignments. NOTE: Students may not count more than a combined total of eight units of directed research projects and policy lab practica toward graduation unless the additional counted units are approved in advance by the Petitions Committee. Such approval will be granted only for good cause shown. Even in the case of a successful petition for additional units, a student cannot receive a letter grade for more than eight units of independent research (Policy Lab practicum, Directed Research, Senior Thesis, and/or Research Track). Any units taken in excess of eight will be graded on a mandatory pass basis. For detailed information, see "Directed Research/Policy Labs" in the SLS Student Handbook. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and e-mail the Consent Application Form available on the SLS Registrar's Office website (see Registration and Selection of Classes for Stanford Law Students) to the instructors. See Consent Application Form for submission deadline.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
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