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1 - 10 of 51 results for: CARDCOURSES::env

ASNAMST 123: Asian Americans and Environmental Justice (EARTHSYS 123)

One central tenet of the environmental justice movement is centering the leadership of frontline communities. Unfortunately, the struggles of Asian Americans on the frontlines of corporate environmental pollution and extraction are less visible and less well-known. In this course, we will explore the Asian American voices that have contributed to the development of the environmental justice movement and the leadership that is shaping the future of this movement.nThis course is designed to provide students with education about the history of the environmental justice movement, the future being envisioned, and the strategies that are needed to get to the vision. It will draw on lectures, readings, guest presentations, case studies, and the instructor's more than 15 years of experience with organizing and social justice campaigns. Students will learn about the principles guiding the environmental justice movement; the vision and framework of how we achieve a just transition to a regenerative economy; the process of organizing and campaign work to advance a community agenda; and skills in collecting, analyzing, and communicating information.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIOHOPK 168H: Disease Ecology: from parasites evolution to the socio-economic impacts of pathogens on nations (BIOHOPK 268H)

(Graduate students register for 268H.) Course will lead participants on a journey through the dynamics of infectious diseases that will start at the smallest level from within-host parasite dynamics and will progressively scale up to parasite evolution, disease ecology, public health policies, disease driven poverty traps and the socio-economic impact of infectious diseases on nations. The course will be organized around case studies, including among the others, schistosomiasis, malaria, cholera and sleeping sickness. Participants will have the opportunity to develop a capstone project.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIOHOPK 268H: Disease Ecology: from parasites evolution to the socio-economic impacts of pathogens on nations (BIOHOPK 168H)

(Graduate students register for 268H.) Course will lead participants on a journey through the dynamics of infectious diseases that will start at the smallest level from within-host parasite dynamics and will progressively scale up to parasite evolution, disease ecology, public health policies, disease driven poverty traps and the socio-economic impact of infectious diseases on nations. The course will be organized around case studies, including among the others, schistosomiasis, malaria, cholera and sleeping sickness. Participants will have the opportunity to develop a capstone project.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 124X: Disasters, Decisions, Development in Sustainable Urban Systems (CEE) (CEE 224X)

CEE 224X of the CEE 224XYZ SUS Project series is joining forces with D3: Disasters, Decisions, Development to offer D3+SUS which will connect principles of sustainable urban systems with the challenge of increasing resilience in the San Francisco Bay Area. The project-based learning course is designed to align with the Resilient By Design | Bay Area Challenge Collaborative Research Phase ( http://resilientbayarea.org); students will learn the basic concepts of resilience and tools of risk analysis while applying those mindsets and toolsets to a collective research product delivered to the RBD community. Students who take D3+SUS are encouraged to continue on to CE 224Y and CEE 224Z, in which teams will be paired with local partners and will develop interventions to improve the resilience of local communities. For more information, visit http://sus.stanford.edu/courses. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center).
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 224X: Disasters, Decisions, Development in Sustainable Urban Systems (CEE) (CEE 124X)

CEE 224X of the CEE 224XYZ SUS Project series is joining forces with D3: Disasters, Decisions, Development to offer D3+SUS which will connect principles of sustainable urban systems with the challenge of increasing resilience in the San Francisco Bay Area. The project-based learning course is designed to align with the Resilient By Design | Bay Area Challenge Collaborative Research Phase ( http://resilientbayarea.org); students will learn the basic concepts of resilience and tools of risk analysis while applying those mindsets and toolsets to a collective research product delivered to the RBD community. Students who take D3+SUS are encouraged to continue on to CE 224Y and CEE 224Z, in which teams will be paired with local partners and will develop interventions to improve the resilience of local communities. For more information, visit http://sus.stanford.edu/courses. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center).
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 224Y: Sustainable Urban Systems Project (CEE 124Y, GEOPHYS 118Y, GEOPHYS 218Y)

Sustainable Urban Systems (SUS) Project is a project-based learning experience being piloted for an upcoming new SUS M.S. Program within CEE. Students are placed in small interdisciplinary teams (engineers and non-engineers, undergraduate and graduate level) to work on complex design, engineering, and policy problems presented by external partners in a real urban setting. Multiple projects are offered throughout the academic year and may span multiple quarters. Students are expected to interact with professionals and community stakeholders, conduct independent team work outside of class sessions, and submit deliverables over a series of milestones. To view project descriptions and apply, visit http://sus.stanford.edu/courses/.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 224Z: Sustainable Urban Systems Project (CEE 124Z)

Sustainable Urban Systems (SUS) Project is a project-based learning experience being piloted for an upcoming new SUS M.S. Program within CEE. Students are placed in small interdisciplinary teams (engineers and non-engineers, undergraduate and graduate level) to work on complex design, engineering, and policy problems presented by external partners in a real urban setting. Multiple projects are offered throughout the academic year and may span multiple quarters. Students are expected to interact with professionals and community stakeholders, conduct independent team work outside of class sessions, and submit deliverables over a series of milestones. To view project descriptions and apply, visit http://sus.stanford.edu/courses/.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CSRE 95: Liberation Through Land: Organic Gardening and Racial Justice (EARTHSYS 95)

Through field trips, practical work and readings, this course provides students with the tools to begin cultivating a relationship to land that focuses on direct engagement with sustainable gardening, from seed to harvest. The course will take place on the O'Donohue Family Stanford Educational Farm, where students will be given the opportunity to learn how to sow seeds, prepare garden beds, amend soils, build compost, and take care of plants. The history of forced farm labor in the U.S., from slavery to low-wage migrant labor, means that many people of color encounter agricultural spaces as sites of trauma and oppression. In this course we will explore the potential for revisiting a narrative of peaceful relation to land and crop that existed long before the trauma occurred, acknowledging the beautiful history of POC coexistence with land. Since this is a practical course, there will be a strong emphasis on participation. Application available at https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScdKKp7mtTNzS0-qc-La97LPj9w8SsWNZ5xrAYVjiKTR86F6Q/viewform?usp=sf_link; deadline to apply is September 19, 2017, at midnight. The course is co-sponsored by the Institute for Diversity in the Arts (IDA) and the Earth Systems Program.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CSRE 125E: Shades of Green: Redesigning and Rethinking the Environmental Justice Movements (EARTHSYS 125, EARTHSYS 225, URBANST 125)

Historically, discussions of race, ethnicity, culture, and equity in the environment have been relegated to the environmental justice movement, which often focuses on urban environmental degradation and remains separated from other environmental movements. This course will seek to break out of this limiting discussion. We will explore access to outdoor spaces, definitions of wilderness, who is and isn't included in environmental organizations, gender and the outdoors, how colonialism has influenced ways of knowing, and the future of climate change. The course will also have a design thinking community partnership project. Students will work with partner organizations to problem-solve around issues of access and diversity. We value a diversity of experiences and epistemological beliefs, and therefore undergraduates and graduate students from all disciplines are welcome.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EARTH 5: Geokids: Earth Sciences Education

Service learning through the Geokids program. Eight weeks of supervised teaching to early elementary students about Earth sciences. Hands-on teaching strategies for science standards-based instruction.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Saltzman, J. (PI)
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