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41 - 50 of 187 results for: ARTHIST

ARTHIST 208B: The Art of Medieval Spain: Muslims, Christians, Jews

The seminar and its study trip explore the hybrid character of the art of Medieval Spain between the sixth and the fifteenth centuries. Rather than strictly chronological, our exploration of the artistic production of Muslims, Jews, and Christians is structured around major topics such as imperial power, pilgrimage, word and image. The readings juxtapose historical studies of specifically Spanish sites and objects with theoretical approaches tied to the broader themes.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 208C: Architecture, Acoustics and Ritual in Byzantium (ARTHIST 408C, CLASSICS 175, MUSIC 208C, MUSIC 408C, REES 208C, REES 408C, RELIGST 208C, RELIGST 308C)

Onassis Seminar "Icons of Sound: Architecture, Acoustics and Ritual in Byzantium". This year-long seminar explores the creation and operations of sacred space in Byzantium by focusing on the intersection of architecture, acoustics, music, and ritual. Through the support of the Onassis Foundation (USA), nine leading scholars in the field share their research and conduct the discussion of their pre-circulated papers. The goal is to develop a new interpretive framework for the study of religious experience and assemble the research tools needed for work in this interdisciplinary field.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTHIST 212: Renaissance Florence, 1440-1540

Notions of cultural superiority in light of changes in Florentine society as it went from being a republic to a duchy ruled by the Medici. Artists and architects such as Donatello, Brunelleschi, Botticelli, Michelangelo, and Pontormo praised as having revived the arts and returned them to a level of ancient splendor. The role of the sacred in daily life and uses of the pagan past for poetic and scholarly expressions and as vehicles for contemporary experience.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Hansen, M. (PI)

ARTHIST 213: Renaissance Print Culture: Art in the Cantor Arts Center

The seminar takes place in the Cantor Arts Center and provides a unique opportunity to study original works of art from the museum's storage. Beginning in the fifteenth century new techniques of reproduction changed the pictorial culture of Europe. Some engravings called attention to the engraver's virtuosity, and the private nature of the medium was explored for erotic imagery. By the sixteenth century printed images were used for political and religious propaganda during the societal upheavals.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 214: From the Pantheon to the Capitol: Architecture, Cosmology, Mathematics and Illusion (SIW 214)

This course traces the history of the dome over two millenia, from temples to the gods to Temples of the State, and from cosmic archetype to architectural fetish. The narrative interweaves the themes of the dome as image of the Cosmos, religious icon, national landmark, and political monument. It examines the dome not only as a venue for structural innovation, but also metaphysical geometry and transcendent illusionism.nIndividual case studies will familiarise you with major architects from Hadrian to Richard Rogers and historical milestones from the Dome of the Rock to the Capitol in Washington DC. May be repeat for credit.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Barry, F. (PI)

ARTHIST 217B: Architectural Theory from Antiquity to Le Corbusier (ARTHIST 417B)

This seminar focuses on themes and theories in architectural design from antiquity until the early twentieth century. Modern and contemporary architecture has often claimed its modernity through the incorporation of theory, but this seminar examines selections from key texts that have also moulded architectural and urbanistic thought in the ancient, medieval, and early modern eras in combination with analytical comparisons of built architecture.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Barry, F. (PI)

ARTHIST 243C: The Art of Travel

This undergraduate seminar explores a variety of objects upon which we see the marks of makers smitten and/or stymied by new technologies of transportation ¿ objects about the steamship, the railroad, the automobile, the airplane, the space shuttle, the internet. Among many types of material culture, the course considers scrimshaw, album quilts, maps, paintings, photographs, city plans, hood ornaments, and advertisements from the early Republic to the present. How do objects mark geographic movement, and the social relationships forged in the process? What do these marks tell us about how we, as contemporary viewers, experience the world?
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Bennett, E. (PI)

ARTHIST 245: Art, Business & the Law

This course examines the intersection of art, business, and the law from a number of different angles, focusing on issues that impact our understanding of works of art and their circulation in the modern and contemporary periods. Topics range from individual case studies (e.g., Leonardo da Vinci; Richard Serra) to the consolidation of the art market, and include cultural heritage issues, problems of censorship, and conceptions of authorship and intellectual property.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 263B: The View through the Windshield: Cars and the American Landscape

Both cars and the landscape are fundamental to American identity. This seminar will consider the relationship between them: how they have shaped each other, how one mediates the experience of the other, and how American artists such as Ansel Adams, Edward Hopper, and Ed Ruscha have represented both. We will discuss the relationship between nature and technology; the aesthetics of highways and parkways; the phenomenology of driving and road trips; maps and way finding; and the future of cars, mapping, and the landscape.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 264A: Picturing the Cosmos

This seminar explores the place of images in how we understand and imagine the universe. The course draws on art, science, and popular culture, and pays particular attention to the ways they inform each other. Examples include: star maps, science fiction films, appropriated astronomical images, and telescopic views of stars, planets, and nebulae. Using these representations as well as accompanying readings we will discuss the importance of aesthetics for conceptions of the cosmos; the influence of technology on representations; strategies for representing concepts that exceed the limits of human vision; and the ways that views of the universe reflect and shape their cultural context. Open to undergraduates and graduates.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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