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121 - 130 of 187 results for: ARTHIST

ARTHIST 246B: Pop Art (AMSTUD 246B)

A new course on the history and meaning of Pop art in the United States and abroad. The course will feature close study of paintings, photographs, and prints at the Cantor Art Center. The course will be given in the Denning Family Resource Room, located in The Anderson Collection building. If you have any questions regarding the location, please contact Linda Esquivel at lindae@stanford.edu.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Meyer, R. (PI)

ARTHIST 248B: Architecture, Urbanism, and Visual Culture in Early Modern Rome

This seminar investigates architecture in Rome, from Michelangelo to Piranesi. It examines the origins of modern urbanism; the piazza as ceremonial theater; the water network and fountain displays; palace design inside and out; religious institutions, from convents to confraternities; church design inside and out; the devotional and illusionistic space of the family chapel; festival architecture; light symbolism and geometry; the use of new materials and technologies; the relationship of early modern architecture to painting and sculpture; and the question of a unity of the arts.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 255: Hidden Histories: Art and Misrepresentation

What happens when art functions as a decoy, taking us away from stories that it refuses to tell? We will explore three modern artists who grapple, in unpredictable ways, with the historical events that have shaped them: Philip Guston and the Holocaust; Martin Puryear and the Civil Rights movement; and South African artist William Kentridge and apartheid. When appropriate, we will look at objects at the Cantor Art Center (Stanford) as well as museums in the Bay Area. The course will provide the foundation for an exhibition at the Cantor Arts Center and the Yale University Art Gallery in 2016.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 262: Office of Metropolitan Architecture: Workshop of the New (CEE 132Q)

This seminar investigates all aspects of the work of the Office of Metropolitan Architecture (OMA) and its leader Rem Koolhaas. Topics for class research and inquiry include but are not be limited to: Koolhaas's early work at the Architectural Association and the founding of OMA, the publications of OMA and their style of presentation and theoretical foundations, the importance of AMO, and the architects who have left OMA and founded their own practices and how these differ from OMA. Each student completes an in-depth research paper and an in-class presentation.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTHIST 269A: Art and Technology (STS 200I)

The dynamic relationship between art and technology and its formative impact on culture, politics and society. Beginning with Aristotle on the notion of techne and its implications for art and craft, the seminar will focus primarily on the modern period as well as contemporary developments. Topics: The invention of linear perspective during the Renaissance as influenced by Arab mathematics; the culture of optical devices and painting; the birth of photography and cinema and new forms of pictorial representation; the avant-garde and the ¿Machine Age¿; art and technology collaborations during the 1960s; interactivity and the rise of media arts; sound art; biotechnology and the arts. Guest speakers and possible field trips. Enrollment limited to STS Senior majors and art and art history majors.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 287: Pictures of the Floating World: Images from Japanese Popular Culture (ARTHIST 487X, JAPANLIT 287)

Printed objects produced during the Edo period (1600-1868), including the Ukiyo-e (pictures of the floating world) and lesser-studied genres such as printed books (ehon) and popular broadsheets (kawaraban). How a society constructs itself through images. The borders of the acceptable and censorship; theatricality, spectacle, and slippage; the construction of play, set in conflict against the dominant neo-Confucian ideology of fixed social roles.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 287A: The Japanese Tea Ceremony: The History, Aesthetics, and Politics Behind a National Pastime (JAPANGEN 287A)

The Japanese tea ceremony, the ultimate premodern multimedia phenomenon, integrates architecture, garden design, ceramics, painting, calligraphy, and other treasured objects into a choreographed ritual wherein host, objects, and guests perform designated roles on a tiny stage sometimes only six feet square.. In addition to its much-touted aesthetic and philosophical aspects, the practice of tea includes inevitable political and rhetorical dimensions. This course traces the evolution of tea practice from its inception within the milieu of courtier diversions, Zen monasteries, and warrior villas, through its various permutations into the 20th century, where it was manipulated by the emerging industrialist class for different-but ultimately similar-ends.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Takeuchi, M. (PI)

ARTHIST 288B: The Enduring Passion for Ink: Contemporary Chinese Ink Painting

Contemporary Chinese ink painters are exploring new ground. They push the limits of the medium, creating installations and performances, mixing ink with other media, and advancing age-tested brushstrokes and compositions. The recent flurry of exhibitions attests to contemporary ink painting¿s increasing importance. nnThis seminar introduces major figures (Xu Bing, Liu Dan, Zheng Chongbin, Li Huasheng, etc.) and movements in contemporary Chinese ink art. Emphasis is placed on improving writing abilities and on in-class reports and discussion. Topics for discussion include readings, individual works of art, and broad issues in contemporary art. Prerequisite: courses in Art History and/or Studio Art OR permission of instructor. open to undergraduates and graduates.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTHIST 289A: Making the Masterpiece in Song Dynasty China (ARTHIST 489A)

Studies of canon formation involving Song Dynasty (10-13th c.) Chinese works of painting, calligraphy, ceramics, and architecture. The roles of early art writing and criticism; collecting histories; art historical theory; / copying, imitation, and reproductive practices; period and regional taste; and modern museological and art historical discourses in identifying and constructing a canon of Song masterworks.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Vinograd, R. (PI)

ARTHIST 295: Visual Arts Internship

Professional experience in a field related to the Visual Arts for six to ten weeks. Internships may include work for galleries, museums, art centers, and art publications. Students arrange the internship, provide a confirmation letter from the hosting institution, and must receive consent from the faculty coordinator to enroll in units. To supplement the internship students maintain a journal and write a research paper related to the experience and their area of academic interest. Evaluations from the student and the supervisor are submitted at the end of the internship. Restricted to declared majors and minors. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
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