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11 - 20 of 30 results for: ARTHIST

ARTHIST 284B: Museum Cultures: Material Representation in the Past and Present (AMSTUD 134, ARCHLGY 134, ARCHLGY 234, CSRE 134, EDUC 214, NATIVEAM 134)

Students will open the "black box" of museums to consider the past and present roles of institutional collections, culminating in a student-curated exhibition. Today, museums assert their relevance as dynamic spaces for debate and learning. Colonialism and restitution, the politics of representation, human/object relationships, and changing frameworks of authority make museum work widely significant and consistently challenging. Through thinking-in-practice, this course reflexively explores "museum cultures": representations of self and other within museums and institutional cultures of the museum world itself.n3 credits (no final project) or 5 credits (final project). May be repeat for credit
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 287A: The Japanese Tea Ceremony: The History, Aesthetics, and Politics Behind a National Pastime (JAPAN 288)

The Japanese tea ceremony, the ultimate premodern multimedia phenomenon, integrates architecture, garden design, ceramics, painting, calligraphy, and other treasured objects into a choreographed ritual wherein host, objects, and guests perform designated roles on a tiny stage sometimes only six feet square.. In addition to its much-touted aesthetic and philosophical aspects, the practice of tea includes inevitable political and rhetorical dimensions. This course traces the evolution of tea practice from its inception within the milieu of courtier diversions, Zen monasteries, and warrior villas, through its various permutations into the 20th century, where it was manipulated by the emerging industrialist class for different-but ultimately similar-ends.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Takeuchi, M. (PI)

ARTHIST 295: Visual Arts Internship

Professional experience in a field related to the Visual Arts for six to ten weeks. Internships may include work for galleries, museums, art centers, and art publications. Students arrange the internship, provide a confirmation letter from the hosting institution, and must receive consent from the faculty coordinator to enroll in units. To supplement the internship students maintain a journal and write a research paper related to the experience and their area of academic interest. Evaluations from the student and the supervisor are submitted at the end of the internship. Restricted to declared majors and minors. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ARTHIST 297: Honors Thesis Writing

May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 298: Individual Work: Art History

Prerequisite: student must have taken a course with the instructor and/or completed relevant introductory course(s). Instructor consent and completion of the Independent Study Form are required prior to enrollment. All necessary forms and payment are required by the end of Week 2 of each quarter. Please contact the Undergraduate Coordinator in McMurtry 108 for more information. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 347: Modernism and Modernity (ARTHIST 147)

The development of modern art and visual culture in Europe and the US, beginning with Paris in the 1860s, the period of Haussmann, Baudelaire and Manet, and ending with the Bauhaus and Surrealism in the 1920s and 30s. Modernism in art, architecture and design (e.g., Gauguin, Picasso, Duchamp, Mondrian, Le Corbusier, Breuer, Dali) will be explored as a compelling dream of utopian possibilities involving multifaceted and often ambivalent, even contradictory responses to the changes brought about by industrialization, urbanization, and the rise of mass culture.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Troy, N. (PI)

ARTHIST 420: Art and Invisibility: The Dissemblance of Labour.

Labor has been at the center of political and philosophical analyses from Jean-Jacques Rousseau to Simone Weil. While uncovering essential stages in the conceptualization of labor--is labor work? How does it differ from process?--this course reframes the question of the nature of labor and artmaking in relation to invisibility. How come entire stages of production have disappeared from history? How have patrons, builders, and artists managed to erase their presence from their artifacts? To what extent do art historical narratives still pursue ideologies of exclusion or, at least, of carelessness when they get to who did what? By pairing specific case studies from the eleventh to the twentieth centuries with select passages from A-list thinkers of labor (Agamben, Arendt, Aristotle), this course offers both a history of a troublesome concept and a series of opportunities to rethink the agendas of a discipline that has often turned a blind eye to specific aspects of making. Interdisciplinary in spirit--we focus on select groups of paintings, buildings, organizations, and co-operations--the course also serves as an occasion for introspective analyses, thus helping future researchers to re-think the ways they work and the political motives of their investigations.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 464: American Art and Anthropology

This graduate seminar will address the intertwined histories of American art and anthropology from 1850-1950. During this period, the discipline of anthropology underwent a fundamental shift from a preoccupation with scientific racism to an emphasis on cultural pluralism. How did anthropology¿s transforming conception of ¿culture¿ inflect interethnic artistic exchange and the emergence of American modernism? Key subjects of inquiry will include racial objectification, the colonial gaze, ¿outsider¿ art, documentary and ethnographic film, and cultural appropriation.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Kwon, M. (PI)

ARTHIST 473: Couture Culture

This seminar examines the relationship between art, fashion and representation in Europe and the United States at key moments between 1860 and the present. Beginning with Baudelaire, Impressionism, the rise of the department store and the emergence of haute couture, we will look at what might be described as the love/hate relationship between art and fashion that has been a recurring feature of modern and contemporary art, design and architecture, culminating in the spectacular fashion exhibitions mounted at the Guggenheim, Metropolitan, Victoria & Albert and other major art museums in recent years. Students will pursue related research projects of their choice.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Troy, N. (PI)
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