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11 - 20 of 34 results for: ARTHIST

ARTHIST 243B: Photography and Time

This course examines the relationship between photography and temporality from the nineteenth century until the present day. We will study how the new medium interacted with other nineteenth-century technologies to produce a mechanized and standardized time, as well as attempts to use photography to destabilize such objective temporalities. In the twentieth century, we consider the dominant theorization of photography as an art that addresses time, history, and memory through study of critical texts by Benjamin, Barthes, and Bazin, among others. The course concludes by interrogating the applicability of these analogue theories to contemporary photographic practices. Attention to the technical labor of making photographs and the materiality of photographs in the archive will be central to the course, enabled by visits to the Cantor and Special Collections.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Beil, K. (PI)

ARTHIST 268: Encountering Contemporary Chinese Painting: Media and Themes (ARTHIST 468)

Two spring quarter exhibitions -- oil paintings and drawings by Zeng Fanzhi at the Anderson Collection, and Ink Worlds with works by two dozen major ink painters, calligraphers and video essayists at the Cantor -- convey part of the diversity of contemporary Chinese art practice. This seminar will explore media and techniques, artistic careers and strategies, and questions of cultural identity, history, place, language and the visionary presented by these artists and exhibitions.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Vinograd, R. (PI)

ARTHIST 284B: Museum Cultures: Material Representation in the Past and Present (AMSTUD 134, ARCHLGY 134, ARCHLGY 234, CSRE 134, EDUC 214, NATIVEAM 134)

Students will open the "black box" of museums to consider the past and present roles of institutional collections, culminating in a student-curated exhibition. Today, museums assert their relevance as dynamic spaces for debate and learning. Colonialism and restitution, the politics of representation, human/object relationships, and changing frameworks of authority make museum work widely significant and consistently challenging. Through thinking-in-practice, this course reflexively explores "museum cultures": representations of self and other within museums and institutional cultures of the museum world itself.n3 credits (no final project) or 5 credits (final project). May be repeat for credit
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Hodge, C. (PI)

ARTHIST 287A: The Japanese Tea Ceremony: The History, Aesthetics, and Politics Behind a National Pastime (JAPAN 288)

The Japanese tea ceremony, the ultimate premodern multimedia phenomenon, integrates architecture, garden design, ceramics, painting, calligraphy, and other treasured objects into a choreographed ritual wherein host, objects, and guests perform designated roles on a tiny stage sometimes only six feet square.. In addition to its much-touted aesthetic and philosophical aspects, the practice of tea includes inevitable political and rhetorical dimensions. This course traces the evolution of tea practice from its inception within the milieu of courtier diversions, Zen monasteries, and warrior villas, through its various permutations into the 20th century, where it was manipulated by the emerging industrialist class for different-but ultimately similar-ends.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Harrison, L. (PI)

ARTHIST 295: Visual Arts Internship

Professional experience in a field related to the Visual Arts for six to ten weeks. Internships may include work for galleries, museums, art centers, and art publications. Students arrange the internship, provide a confirmation letter from the hosting institution, and must receive consent from the faculty coordinator to enroll in units. To supplement the internship students maintain a journal and write a research paper related to the experience and their area of academic interest. Evaluations from the student and the supervisor are submitted at the end of the internship. Restricted to declared majors and minors. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ARTHIST 297: Honors Thesis Writing

May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 298: Individual Work: Art History

Prerequisite: student must have taken a course with the instructor and/or completed relevant introductory course(s). Instructor consent and completion of the Independent Study Form are required prior to enrollment. All necessary forms and payment are required by the end of Week 2 of each quarter. Please contact the Undergraduate Coordinator in McMurtry 108 for more information. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 343A: American Architecture (AMSTUD 143A, ARTHIST 143A, CEE 32R)

A historically based understanding of what defines American architecture. What makes American architecture American, beginning with indigenous structures of pre-Columbian America. Materials, structure, and form in the changing American context. How these ideas are being transformed in today's globalized world.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 347: Modernism and Modernity (ARTHIST 147)

The development of modern art and visual culture in Europe and the US, beginning with Paris in the 1860s, the period of Haussmann, Baudelaire and Manet, and ending with the Bauhaus and Surrealism in the 1920s and 30s. Modernism in art, architecture and design (e.g., Gauguin, Picasso, Duchamp, Mondrian, Le Corbusier, Breuer, Dali) will be explored as a compelling dream of utopian possibilities involving multifaceted and often ambivalent, even contradictory responses to the changes brought about by industrialization, urbanization, and the rise of mass culture.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Troy, N. (PI)

ARTHIST 351: Migration and Diaspora in American Art, 1800-Present (AMSTUD 151, ARTHIST 151)

This lecture course explores American art through the lens of immigration, exile, and diaspora. We will examine a wide range of work by immigrant artists and craftsmen, paying special attention to issues of race and ethnicity, assimilation, displacement, and political turmoil. Artists considered include Emmanuel Leutze, Thomas Cole, Joseph Stella, Chiura Obata, Willem de Kooning, Jimme Durham, Mona Hatoum, and Julie Mehretu, among many others. How do works of art reflect ¿ and help shape ¿ cultural and individual imaginaries of home and belonging?
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Kwon, M. (PI)
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