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171 - 180 of 296 results for: ME

ME 302: The Future of the Automobile

This quarter, the seminar will take a specific focus on "Advanced Driver Assistance Systems", which help drivers to maneuver their vehicles through traffic. Those systems range from navigation systems, adaptive cruise control, night vision, lane departure warning over automated parking, traffic jam assistance, to self-driving cars. With this breadth of applications, advanced driver assistance systems play an important role in making traffic safer, more efficient, and more enjoyable. This course, lectured by an industry expert, will introduce students to technology behind the systems, the benefits, challenges, and future perspectives of this exciting field. At the end of the quarter, students will have developed a technical understanding as well as an understanding for the interactions of the technology, business, and society with a specific automotive focus.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ME 302A: The Future of the Automobile- Trends and Challenges in Personal Mobility

The objective of this course is to develop an understanding for the requirements that go into the design of a highly complex yet easy-to-use product, i.e. the automobile. Students will learn about very different interdisciplinary aspects that characterize the automobile and personal mobility. This is the first part of a 3-quarter seminar series, which build on one another but can be taken independently. This quarter, the seminar will discuss general aspects of the automobile and personal mobility. In the first half of the quarter, students will learn about different aspects of the automobile and understand key characteristics and conflicts. Primary trends such as electrification, automation, communication, and commoditization will be discussed. In the second half of the quarter, guest speakers from academia and industry will share their vision regarding the future of the automobile and how design challenges are addressed within their respective organizations. At the end of the quarter, students will have developed a broader understanding of the intertwined technology - environmental - human - business - legal aspects that will shape the future of the automobile.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Beiker, S. (PI)

ME 302B: The Future of the Automobile- Driver Assistance and Automated Driving

The objective of this course is to develop an understanding for the requirements that go into the design of a highly complex yet easy-to-use product, i.e. the automobile. Students will learn about very different interdisciplinary aspects that characterize the automobile and personal mobility. This is the second part of a 3-quarter seminar series, which build on one another but can be taken independently. This quarter, the seminar will discuss how various vehicle systems help drivers to maneuver their vehicles through traffic. Advanced driver assistance systems range from navigation, adaptive cruise control, night vision, and lane departure warning to automated parking, traffic jam assistance, and eventually self-driving cars. These systems play an important role in making traffic safer, more efficient, and more enjoyable. This course, lectured by an industry expert, will introduce students to the technology behind the systems, the benefits, challenges, and future perspectives of this exciting field. Students will develop an understanding for the interactions of the technology, business, and society with a specific automotive focus.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Becker, J. (PI)

ME 302C: The Future of the Automobile- Vehicle Communication Systems

ME302C-The Future of the Automobile - Vehicle Communication SystemsnThe objective of this course is to develop an understanding for the requirements that go into the design of a highly complex yet easy-to-use product, i.e. the automobile. Students will learn about very different interdisciplinary aspects that characterize the automobile and personal mobility. This is the third part of a 3-quarter seminar series, which build on one another but can be taken independently. This quarter, the seminar will discuss how vehicles communicate with with one another and beyond. Respective in-vehicle concepts include online media services, connections to a centralized traffic management infrastructure, communication among vehicles to avoid collisions and improve traffic flow. This class consists in the first half of lectures by an industry expert introducing technical and regulatory aspects of connected vehicles. In the second half, students will team up in groups and conceptualize scenarios for vehicle communication systems. Students will develop an understanding for the interactions of the technology, business, and society with a specific automotive focus.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ME 303: Biomechanics of Flight

Study of biological flight as an inspiration for designing robots. The goal is to give students a broad understanding of the biomechanics of natural flight, and an in-depth understanding of bird flight. This course elucidates how students can pick and choose exciting biological questions, use biological and engineering techniques to answer them, and use the results to identify bio-inspired design applications. Prerequisites: Fluid mechanics OR Aerodynamics AND Fluent Matlab skills. Course website URL: http://lentinklab.stanford.edu/impact/stanford_teaching
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Lentink, D. (PI)

ME 304: The Designer's Voice

This course for Masters students in the Stanford Design Program helps students develop a point of view about their design career that will enable them to articulate their design vision, inspire a design studio, or infect a business with a culture of design-thinking. This class focuses on the integration of work and worldview, professional values, design language, and the development of the designer's voice. Includes seminar-style discussions, role-playing, short writing assignments, guest speakers, and individual mentoring and coaching.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ME 305: Statistics for Design Researchers

Comprehensive yet friendly introduction to the fundamental concepts of inferential statistics, primarily used in survey research. Course content delivered via online video lectures, with group classroom time dedicated to completing the lab assignment. All examples and assignments involve writing code in R, interpreting R output and creating visual output with ggplot2. Two-unit credit requires completion of an analysis project using data collected as part of an NSF-funded engineering education research project. Auditors welcome.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ME 308: Spatial Motion

The geometry of motion in Euclidean space. Fundamentals of theory of screws with applications to robotic mechanisms, constraint analysis, and vehicle dynamics. Methods for representing the positions of spatial systems of rigid bodies with their inter-relationships; the formulation of Newton-Euler kinetics applied to serial chain systems such as industrial robotics.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ME 309: Finite Element Analysis in Mechanical Design

Basic concepts of finite elements, with applications to problems confronted by mechanical designers. Linear static, modal, and thermal formulations emphasized; nonlinear and dynamic formulations introduced. Application of a commercial finite element code in analyzing design problems. Issues: solution methods, modeling techniques, features of various commercial codes, basic problem definition. Individual projects focus on the interplay of analysis and testing in product design/development. Prerequisites: Math 51, or equivalent. Recommended: ME80 or CEE101A, or equivalent in structural and/or solid mechanics; some exposure to principles of heat transfer.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Sheppard, S. (PI)

ME 310X: New Product Management

Restricted to graduate students. Focus is on the role of the product manager in industry. Topics include product management skills, leadership and team management, getting a product management job, corporate and project finance for engineers, sales and marketing for engineers and business strategy. Seminar with in-class exercises and guest speakers from industry. Limited to 50. Prerequisite: Enrolled ME310 students only.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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