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11 - 20 of 35 results for: CSRE

CSRE 94: Topics in Writing and Rhetoric: Empathy, Ethics, and Compassion Meditation (PWR 194DH)

Does not fulfill NSC requirement. In this course, we'll extend this discussion by expanding our thinking about rhetoric as a means of persuasion to consider its relation to empathy-as a mode of listening to and understanding audiences and communities we identify with as well as those whose beliefs and actions can be lethal. We'll also practice compassion medication and empathetic rhetoric to see how these ethical stances affect us individually and investigate the ways they may and may not be scaled to address social justice more broadly. Finally, with the course readings and discussions in mind, you will explore a social justice issue and create an essay, a workshop, campaign or movement strategy, podcast, vlog, infographic, Facebook group, syllabus, etc. to help move us closer to positive change. Prerequisite: first two levels of the writing requirement or equivalent transfer credit. For topics, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/courses/advanced-pwr-courses.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Hunter, D. (PI)

CSRE 95: Liberation Through Land: Organic Gardening and Racial Justice (EARTHSYS 95)

Through field trips, practical work and readings, this course provides students with the tools to begin cultivating a relationship to land that focuses on direct engagement with sustainable gardening, from seed to harvest. The course will take place on the O'Donohue Family Stanford Educational Farm, where students will be given the opportunity to learn how to sow seeds, prepare garden beds, amend soils, build compost, and take care of plants. The history of forced farm labor in the U.S., from slavery to low-wage migrant labor, means that many people of color encounter agricultural spaces as sites of trauma and oppression. In this course we will explore the potential for revisiting a narrative of peaceful relation to land and crop that existed long before the trauma occurred, acknowledging the beautiful history of POC coexistence with land. Since this is a practical course, there will be a strong emphasis on participation. Application available at https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScdKKp7mtTNzS0-qc-La97LPj9w8SsWNZ5xrAYVjiKTR86F6Q/viewform?usp=sf_link; deadline to apply is September 19, 2017, at midnight. The course is co-sponsored by the Institute for Diversity in the Arts (IDA) and the Earth Systems Program.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CSRE 102A: Art and Social Criticism (AFRICAAM 102B, AMSTUD 102, ARTHIST 162B, FEMGEN 102)

Visual artists have long been in the forefront of social criticism in America. Since the 1960s, various visual strategies have helped emergent progressive political movements articulate and represent complex social issues. Which artists and particular art works/projects have become key anchors for discourses on racism, sexism, economic and social inequality, immigrant rights and climate change? We will learn about a spectrum of political art designed to raise social awareness, spark social change and rouse protest. The Art Workers Coalition¿s agit-prop opposing the Vietnam War and ACT-UP¿s emblematic signs and symbols during the AIDS/HIV crisis of the 1980s galvanized a generation into action. Works such as Judy Chicago¿s The Dinner Party (1979), Fred Wilson¿s Mining the Museum (1992), and Glenn Ligon¿s paintings appropriating fragments from African-American literature all raised awareness by excavating historical evidence of the long legacy resisting marginalization. For three decades more »
Visual artists have long been in the forefront of social criticism in America. Since the 1960s, various visual strategies have helped emergent progressive political movements articulate and represent complex social issues. Which artists and particular art works/projects have become key anchors for discourses on racism, sexism, economic and social inequality, immigrant rights and climate change? We will learn about a spectrum of political art designed to raise social awareness, spark social change and rouse protest. The Art Workers Coalition¿s agit-prop opposing the Vietnam War and ACT-UP¿s emblematic signs and symbols during the AIDS/HIV crisis of the 1980s galvanized a generation into action. Works such as Judy Chicago¿s The Dinner Party (1979), Fred Wilson¿s Mining the Museum (1992), and Glenn Ligon¿s paintings appropriating fragments from African-American literature all raised awareness by excavating historical evidence of the long legacy resisting marginalization. For three decades feminist artists Barbara Kruger and the Guerilla Girls have combined institutional critique and direct address into a provocative form of criticality. Recent art for social justice is reaching ever broadening publics by redrawing the role of artist and audience exemplified by the democratization of poster making and internet campaigns of Occupy and the Movement for Black Lives. We will also consider the collective aesthetic activisms in the Post-Occupy era including Global Ultra Luxury Faction, Climate Justice art projects, and the visual culture of Trump era mass protests. Why are each of these examples successful as influential and enduring markers of social criticism? What have these socially responsive practices contributed to our understanding of American history?
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Hertz, B. (PI)

CSRE 103: Intergroup Communication (PSYCH 103)

In an increasingly globalized world, our ability to connect and engage with new audiences is directly correlated with our competence and success in any field How do our intergroup perceptions and reactions influence our skills as communicators? This course uses experiential activities and discussion sections to explore the role of social identity in effective communication.nnThe objective of the course is to examine and challenge our explicit and implicit assumptions about various groups to enhance our ability to successfully communicate across the complex web of identity.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CSRE 103B: Race, Ethnicity, and Linguistic Diversity in Classrooms: Sociocultural Theory and Practices (AFRICAAM 106, EDUC 103B, EDUC 337)

Focus is on classrooms with students from diverse racial, ethnic and linguistic backgrounds. Studies, writing, and media representation of urban and diverse school settings; implications for transforming teaching and learning. Issues related to developing teachers with attitudes, dispositions, and skills necessary to teach diverse students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CSRE 103F: Intergroup Communication Facilitation (PSYCH 103F)

This is a TA training course for Psych 103 - Intergroup Communication
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CSRE 103S: Gender in Native American Societies (FEMGEN 103S, NATIVEAM 103S)

Seminar examines the impact of colonialism on gender roles & gender relations in American Indian communities beginning with the 17th century to the present. Topics include demographic changes; social, political & economic transformations associated with biological & spiritual assaults; the dynamism & diversity of native societies. Sources include history, ethnography, biography, autobiography, the novel & film.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Anderson, J. (PI)

CSRE 114: Sound Tracks: Music, Memory, and Migration in the Twentieth Century (MUSIC 114)

This course comprises a thematic exploration of forces, experiences, and after-effects of diasporas of communities in the Americas and Europe throughout the 20th century. Through close listening accompanied by historical and theoretical readings, students will gain deeper insights into the making of meaning in music and the role of music as a creative response to the challenges of migration and minority-status in the modern nation-state. Historical examples will draw from the Romani diaspora, Eastern-European Jewish liturgical sounds, the Mexican-US border, and from Jazz and the Blues. We explore issues of race, ethnicity, identity, nationalism, minoritization as they intersect in the sound tracks of diaspora.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CSRE 121: Discourse of the Colonized: Native American and Indigenous Voices (NATIVEAM 121)

Using the assigned texts covering the protest movements in the 20th century to the texts written from the perspective of the colonized at the end of the 20th century, students will engage in discussions on decolonization. Students will be encouraged to critically explore issues of interest through two short papers and a 15-20 minute presentation on the topic of interest relating to decolonization for Native Americans in one longer paper. Approaching research from an Indigenous perspective will be encouraged throughout.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-AmerCul | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CSRE 129: Camus (FRENCH 129, HISTORY 235F)

"The Don Draper of Existentialism" for Adam Gopnik, "the ideal husband of contemporary letters" for Susan Sontag, and "the admirable conjunction of a man, of an action, and of a work" for Sartre, Camus embodies the very French figure of the "intellectuel engagé," or public intellectual. From his birth in 1913 into a poor family in Algeria to the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1957, from Saint Germain-des-Prés to his predilection for the mediterranean culture, Camus captured the quest for universalism, for the politics of justice, and engaged in the great ethical battles of his time, from the fight against nazism and communism, from questioning colonial rules to the haunting Algerian War, and his complex "silence" over the war. Camus the Algerian, Camus the moralist, Camus the Resistant: through readings and films, we will explore his multiple, long-lasting legacies. Readings from Albert Camus, Kamel Daoud, Mouloud Feraoun, Alice Kaplan, Orhan Pamuk, A.B. Yehoshua, Assia Djebar, Jean-Paul Sartre, Yasmina Khadra. Movies include "The Stranger," and "Far from Men." This course is a gateway for French Studies, with special emphasis on oral proficiency. Taught in French.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Ulloa, M. (PI)
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