2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

11 - 20 of 408 results for: interdisciplinary

ANTHRO 307: Archaeological Methods

Methodological aspects of field and laboratory practice from traditional archaeological methods to the latest interdisciplinary analytical techniques. The nature of archaeological data and inference; interpretive potential of these techniques. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Bauer, A. (PI)

ANTHRO 308B: Interdisciplinary Research Proposals: Effective Presentation, Skills, and Styles

This seminar examines the diverse skills, methods, and styles required for the development and production of interdisciplinary dissertation and grant proposals. Topical focus centers primarily on proposals with both social science and natural science elements. Proposals may include a diverse suite of methods and analyses. Throughout this course, we critique examples, assess writing styles and presentation, evaluate budgets, assess data management plans, examine tables and figures, and discuss reviews and evaluations of research proposals. Students are expected to be either in the early stages of writing their dissertation proposal or preparing applications for grants and fellowships. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Curran, L. (PI)

ANTHRO 338B: History and Memory

How are history and memory important in the making of collective and public memory? This seminar draws together an interdisciplinary collection of readings with an aim to provide a foundation for seminar participants¿ projects, both historical and contemporary projects. We will explore critiques of the practice of gathering material, i.e., archival and oral histories as well as delve into experimental forms that combine improvisational approaches to history and critique in an effort to develop a methodological tool kit that allows for a push beyond established projects.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Ebron, P. (PI)

ANTHRO 348B: Bodies, Technologies, and Natures in Africa (AFRICAST 249, HISTORY 349)

This interdisciplinary course explores how modern African histories, bodies, and natures have been entangled with technological activities. Viewing Africans as experts and innovators, we consider how technologies have mediated, represented, or performed power in African societies. Topics include infrastructure, extraction, medicine, weapons, communications, sanitation, and more. Themes woven through the course include citizenship, mobility, labor, bricolage, in/formal economies, and technopolitical geographies, among others. Readings draw from history, anthropology, geography, and social/cultural theory.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Hecht, G. (PI)

ANTHRO 353: Landscape

This seminar offers an interdisciplinary approach to the study of landscape, noting the various processes and projects that have help create them. Readings draw together a broad range of theoretical approaches that are attentive to human-non-human interactions and the overlapping and divergent spatial and temporal questions of the exchanges between landscapes and humans. The readings will also draw attention to representational and non-representational ways that material and symbolic aspects of landscapes help constitute the making of place. The aim of the seminar is to explore the various methodologies for what they offer for the study of place.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 355: Cities in Global Perspective

Interdisciplinary approach to examining global cities. The concept of the global city, and the interdependent processes that help produce urban spaces. Situating the transformation of urban spaces within globalization and its differential effects; current explanatory frameworks that pay attention to multiple scales of spatial and economic articulation. Prerequisite: graduate standing. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 358: Anthropology and the Limit of Experience

In this course, we will examine the concept of the ¿limit¿ in relation to questions of experience. Taking an interdisciplinary perspective, we will explore how the limit (as border, threshold, other, transgression, liminality, etc.) frames and disrupts discourses of experience in ethnography, philosophy and literature.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 368: Dynamics of Coupled Human-Natural Systems

This is a graduate research seminar on the interdisciplinary approach to the study of the dynamics of what is known as ¿coupled human-natural systems.¿ We will take a critical perspective on such systems, asking to what extent the idea of coupling of discrete subsystems is intellectually profitable and what defines a ¿human¿ vs. a ¿natural¿ system? We will explore concepts such as coupling, nonlinearity, threshold behavior, feedback, complexity, resilience, and catastrophes. Case studies will be drawn from the literature on human ecology, population dynamics, disease ecology, and social dynamics. Emphasis will be on developing a working knowledge of mathematical and computational models of coupled systems embedded within a rigorous empirical framework of biosocial data collection.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 378: Dynamics of Coupled Human-Natural Systems

This is a graduate research seminar on the interdisciplinary approach to the study of the dynamics of what is known as "coupled human-natural systems." We will take a critical perspective on such systems, asking to what extent the idea of coupling of discrete subsystems is intellectually profitable and what defines a "human" vs. a "natural" system? We will explore concepts such as coupling, nonlinearity, threshold behavior, feedback, complexity, resilience, and catastrophes. Case studies will be drawn from the literature on human ecology, population dynamics, disease ecology, and social dynamics. Emphasis will be on developing a working knowledge of mathematical and computational models of coupled systems embedded within a rigorous empirical framework of biosocial data collection.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 379A: Empathy Lab II: The Potential of Anthropology for the 21st Century (TAPS 379A)

This interdisciplinary arts/anthropology lab class will study and practice methods from performing arts to expand our understandings of cultural contact and develop methods of thinking more expansively about the creative elements and possibilities for ethnographic fieldwork and critical cultural studies. Prerequisite, by instructor consent.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints