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71 - 80 of 103 results for: all courses

MATH 171: Fundamental Concepts of Analysis

Recommended for Mathematics majors and required of honors Mathematics majors. Similar to 115 but altered content and more theoretical orientation. Properties of Riemann integrals, continuous functions and convergence in metric spaces; compact metric spaces, basic point set topology. Prerequisite: 61CM or 61DM or 115 or consent of the instructor. WIM
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MS&E 20: Discrete Probability Concepts And Models

Fundamental concepts and tools for the analysis of problems under uncertainty, focusing on structuring, model building, and analysis. Examples from legal, social, medical, and physical problems. Topics include axioms of probability, probability trees, belief networks, random variables, conditioning, and expectation. The course is fast-paced, but it has no prerequisites.
Terms: Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-FR | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Shachter, R. (PI)

MS&E 120: Probabilistic Analysis

Concepts and tools for the analysis of problems under uncertainty, focusing on focusing on structuring, model building, and analysis. Examples from legal, social, medical, and physical problems. Topics include axioms of probability, probability trees, random variables, distributions, conditioning, expectation, change of variables, and limit theorems. Prerequisite: CME 100 or MATH 51.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MS&E 152: Introduction to Decision Analysis

How to make good decisions in a complex, dynamic, and uncertain world. People often make decisions that on close examination they regard as wrong. Decision analysis uses a structured conversation based on actional thought to obtain clarity of action in a wide variety of domains. Topics: distinctions, possibilities and probabilities, relevance, value of information and experimentation, relevance and decision diagrams, risk attitude.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Shachter, R. (PI)

PHIL 49: Survey of Formal Methods

Survey of important formal methods used in philosophy. The course covers the basics of propositional and elementary predicate logic, probability and decision theory, game theory, and statistics, highlighting philosophical issues and applications. Specific topics include the languages of propositional and predicate logic and their interpretations, rationality arguments for the probability axioms, Nash equilibrium and dominance reasoning, and the meaning of statistical significance tests. Assessment is through a combination of problems designed to solidify competence with the mathematical tools and short-answer questions designed to test conceptual understanding.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Briggs, R. (PI)

PHIL 99: Minds and Machines (LINGUIST 35, PSYCH 35, SYMSYS 1)

(Formerly SYMSYS 100). An overview of the interdisciplinary study of cognition, information, communication, and language, with an emphasis on foundational issues: What are minds? What is computation? What are rationality and intelligence? Can we predict human behavior? Can computers be truly intelligent? How do people and technology interact, and how might they do so in the future? Lectures focus on how the methods of philosophy, mathematics, empirical research, and computational modeling are used to study minds and machines. Undergraduates considering a major in symbolic systems should take this course as early as possible in their program of study.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHIL 150: Mathematical Logic (PHIL 250)

An introduction to the concepts and techniques used in mathematical logic, focusing on propositional, modal, and predicate logic. Highlights connections with philosophy, mathematics, computer science, linguistics, and neighboring fields.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHIL 150E: Logic in Action: A New Introduction to Logic

A new introduction to logic, covering propositional, modal, and first-order logic, with special attention to major applications in describing information and information-driven action. Highlights connections with philosophy, mathematics, computer science, linguistics, and neighboring fields. Based on the open source course 'Logic in Action,' available online at http://www.logicinaction.org/.nFulfills the undergraduate philosophy logic requirement.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHIL 151: Metalogic (PHIL 251)

(Formerly 160A.) The syntax and semantics of sentential and first-order logic. Concepts of model theory. Gödel's completeness theorem and its consequences: the Löwenheim-Skolem theorem and the compactness theorem. Prerequisite: 150 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Icard, T. (PI)

PHIL 151A: Recursion Theory (PHIL 251A)

Computable functions, Turing degrees, generalized computability and definability. "What does it mean for a function from the natural numbers to themselves to be computable?" and "How can noncomputable functions be classified into a hierarchy based on their level of noncomputability?". Theory of relative computability, reducibility notions and degree structures. Prerequisite is PHIL 150, or PHIL 151 or CS 103.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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