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31 - 40 of 42 results for: CSI::economicdevelopment ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

POLISCI 314D: Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law (INTNLREL 114D, IPS 230, POLISCI 114D)

Links among the establishment of democracy, economic growth, and the rule of law. How democratic, economically developed states arise. How the rule of law can be established where it has been historically absent. Variations in how such systems function and the consequences of institutional forms and choices. How democratic systems have arisen in different parts of the world. Available policy instruments used in international democracy, rule of law, and development promotion efforts.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 346P: The Dynamics of Change in Africa (AFRICAST 301A, HISTORY 246, HISTORY 346, POLISCI 246P)

Crossdisciplinary colloquium; required for the M.A. degree in African Studies. Open to advanced undergraduates and PhD students. Addresses critical issues including patterns of economic collapse and recovery; political change and democratization; and political violence, civil war, and genocide. Focus on cross-cutting issues including the impact of colonialism; the role of religion, ethnicity, and inequality; and Africa's engagement with globalization.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Getz, T. (PI)

PUBLPOL 174: The Urban Economy (URBANST 173)

Applies the principles of economic analysis to historical and contemporary urban and regional development issues and policies. Explores themes of urban economic geography, location decision-making by firms and individuals, urban land and housing markets, and local government finance. Critically evaluates historical and contemporary government policies regulating urban land use, housing, employment development, and transportation. Prerequisite: Econ 1A or permission of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Wolfe, M. (PI)

SOC 249: The Urban Underclass (CSRE 149A, SOC 149, URBANST 112)

(Graduate students register for 249.) Recent research and theory on the urban underclass, including evidence on the concentration of African Americans in urban ghettos, and the debate surrounding the causes of poverty in urban settings. Ethnic/racial conflict, residential segregation, and changes in the family structure of the urban poor.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SOC 341W: Workshop: Inequality

Causes, consequences, and structure of inequality; how inequality results from and shapes social classes, occupations, professions, and other aspects of the economy. Research presentations by students, faculty, and guest speakers. Discussion of controversies, theories, and recent writings. May be repeated for credit. Restricted to Sociology doctoral students; others by consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

STRAMGT 583: The Challenges in/with China

The general objective of the course is to develop a better understanding of the changing socio-economic and political situation in China (with its challenges both for China and for the rest of the world). It should make then less difficult to define sustainable strategies for managing effectively in China and for handling the growing interdependence between China and the US; between China and the rest of the world. From assessing critically the performance of China today, students will get an insight in the current complex dynamics of China renaissance/transformation and we will discuss alternative scenarios, with their business and socio-political consequences on the medium term. From this analysis and with a prospective perspective in mind, we will explore alternative strategic business approaches and propose responsible management practices required to build, overtime, a mutually rewarding growing inter-dependence.nMore specifically, the course will initially identify the multi-caus more »
The general objective of the course is to develop a better understanding of the changing socio-economic and political situation in China (with its challenges both for China and for the rest of the world). It should make then less difficult to define sustainable strategies for managing effectively in China and for handling the growing interdependence between China and the US; between China and the rest of the world. From assessing critically the performance of China today, students will get an insight in the current complex dynamics of China renaissance/transformation and we will discuss alternative scenarios, with their business and socio-political consequences on the medium term. From this analysis and with a prospective perspective in mind, we will explore alternative strategic business approaches and propose responsible management practices required to build, overtime, a mutually rewarding growing inter-dependence.nMore specifically, the course will initially identify the multi-causality behind China's achievements and discuss some of the dysfunctions associated, today, with such performance. The conditions of management effectiveness required to enter and succeed overtime in the Chinese market will be identified while the challenges faced by the global expansion of Chinese firms overseas will be illustrated.nThe course will rely upon different pedagogical methods; it will create conditions to share and leverage participants' experience and it will make use of a number of recent cases and research results. nAuditors will be admitted, but they will have to be present (and prepared) in all the sessions.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Student Option LTR/PF

STRAMGT 584: Assessing High Impact Business Models in Emerging Markets

In recent years, we've seen an explosion of innovative business models blazing new trails in emerging markets. Many of these models are achieving commercial success while transforming the lives of low-income populations. Using nine cases of both early-stage, entrepreneur-led ventures and later-stage, public or large-cap firms, this course will examine best practices for scaling new enterprises in emerging markets. It will do so primarily through the lens of a potential investor. It will also explore what is required to spark, nurture and scale entire sectors that serve rapidly growing, often low-income markets. What does it mean to work in markets with limited infrastructure? What common mistakes are made - whether in business model design, in supply chains, or in dealing with government - and how can we avoid them? Which are the best business models to serve markets that corporations have traditionally ignored, and in which government has failed to deliver? Who might be threatened by more »
In recent years, we've seen an explosion of innovative business models blazing new trails in emerging markets. Many of these models are achieving commercial success while transforming the lives of low-income populations. Using nine cases of both early-stage, entrepreneur-led ventures and later-stage, public or large-cap firms, this course will examine best practices for scaling new enterprises in emerging markets. It will do so primarily through the lens of a potential investor. It will also explore what is required to spark, nurture and scale entire sectors that serve rapidly growing, often low-income markets. What does it mean to work in markets with limited infrastructure? What common mistakes are made - whether in business model design, in supply chains, or in dealing with government - and how can we avoid them? Which are the best business models to serve markets that corporations have traditionally ignored, and in which government has failed to deliver? Who might be threatened by the success of these new businesses? The seminar is a good match for Stanford students interested in working or investing in emerging markets. It will be taught by Matt Bannick, who leads Omidyar Network (a $1 billion impact investing fund) and is the former President of eBay International and of PayPal.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: Bannick, M. (PI)

URBANST 104: Civic Dreams, Human Spaces: Urban Design with People

Intensive two-week studio explores the principles underlying vibrant public spaces. Use observation and prototyping tools to inform the process of urban development. Decode public spaces from multiple perspectives: as sites of recreation, interaction, and political contention; as physical infrastructure that municipalities or grassroots citizen groups build and maintain for the common good; and as places with intangible qualities, such as historical memory, identity, and personal stories. In addition to on-campus meetings, this course requires immersive fieldwork in the City of San Francisco, including two weekend overnight stays and the opportunity to re-imagine the design and use of public spaces with local partners. Students who take the course for 4 units will contribute to a final exhibition and expo at the end of the quarter. Enrollment by application only. Find more info and apply at dschool.stanford.edu.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Chan, D. (PI)

URBANST 110: Introduction to Urban Studies

Designed for freshmen and sophomores. Introduction to the study of cities and urban civilization focusing on the utopias that have been produced over time to guide and inspire city-dwellers to improve and perfect their urban environments. History of urbanization and the urban planning theories inspired by Ebenezer Howard, Le Corbusier, Frank Lloyd Wright, the New Urbanists and Smart Growth advocates that address current issues such as urban community dynamics, suburbanization, sustainability, and globalization. Public policy approaches designed to address these issues and utopian visions of what cities could be, or should be, in the future. Topic of the final paper chosen by the student, with consent of instructor, and may be a historical research paper, a policy-advocacy paper, or a proposal for an urban utopia that addresses the challenges and possibilities of urban life today.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

URBANST 113: Introduction to Urban Design: Contemporary Urban Design in Theory and Practice

Comparative studies in neighborhood conservation, inner city regeneration, and growth policies for metropolitan regions. Lect-disc and research focusing on case studies from North America and abroad, team urban design projects. Two Saturday class workshops in San Francisco: 2nd and 4th Saturdays of the quarter. Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DBSocSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-CE, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Glanz, D. (PI)
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