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11 - 20 of 52 results for: VPGE::Specialized ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

EDUC 278: Introduction to Issues in Evaluation

Open to master's and doctoral students with priority to students in the School of Education. Focus is on the basic literature and major theoretical and practical issues in the field of program evaluation. Topics include: defining purpose, obtaining credible evidence, the role of the evaluator, working with stakeholder, values in evaluation, utilization, and professional standards. The course project is to design an evaluation for a complex national or international program selected by the instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 326: Advanced Regression Analysis

Social science researchers often deal with complex data and research questions that traditional statistics models like linear regression cannot adequately address. This course offers the opportunity to understand and apply two widely used types of advanced regression analysis that allow the examination of 1) multilevel data structures (multilevel models) and 2) multivariate research questions (structural equation models).
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Smith, S. (PI)

EDUC 334A: Youth and Education Law Project: Clinical Practice

(Same as LAW 660A). The Youth and Education Law Project offers students the opportunity to participate in a wide variety of educational rights and reform work, including direct representation of youth and families in special education and school discipline matters, community outreach and education, school reform litigation, and/or policy research and advocacy. All students have an opportunity to represent elementary and high school students with disabilities in special education proceedings, to represent students in school discipline proceedings, or to work with community groups in advocating for the provision of better and more equitable educational opportunities to their children. In addition, the clinic may pursue a specific policy research and advocacy project that will result in a written policy brief and policy proposal. Students working on special education matters have the opportunity to handle all aspects of their clients' cases. Students working in this area interview and co more »
(Same as LAW 660A). The Youth and Education Law Project offers students the opportunity to participate in a wide variety of educational rights and reform work, including direct representation of youth and families in special education and school discipline matters, community outreach and education, school reform litigation, and/or policy research and advocacy. All students have an opportunity to represent elementary and high school students with disabilities in special education proceedings, to represent students in school discipline proceedings, or to work with community groups in advocating for the provision of better and more equitable educational opportunities to their children. In addition, the clinic may pursue a specific policy research and advocacy project that will result in a written policy brief and policy proposal. Students working on special education matters have the opportunity to handle all aspects of their clients' cases. Students working in this area interview and counsel clients, investigate and develop facts, work with medical and mental health professionals and experts, conduct legal and educational research, create case plans, and represent clients at individual education program (IEP) team meetings, mediation or special education due process hearings. This work offers students a chance to study the relationship between individual special education advocacy and system-wide reform efforts such as impact litigation. Students working on school discipline matters interview and counsel clients, investigate and develop facts, interview witnesses, conduct legal and educational research, create case plan, and represent clients at school discipline hearings such as expulsion hearings. Such hearings provide the opportunity to present oral and written argument, examine witnesses, and present evidence before a hearing officer. If appropriate and necessary, such proceedings also present the opportunity to represent students on appeal before the school district board of trustees or the county board of education. The education clinic includes two or three mandatory training sessions to be held at the beginning of the term, a weekly seminar that focuses on legal skills and issues in law and education policy, regular case review, and a one hour weekly meeting with the clinic instructor. Admission is by consent of instructor. Beginning with the 2009-2010 academic year, each of the Law School's clinical courses is being offered on a full-time basis for 12 credits.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Koski, W. (PI)

EDUC 351A: Statistical Methods for Longitudinal Research (STATS 222)

See http://rogosateaching.com/stat222/. Research designs and statistical procedures for time-ordered (repeated-measures) data. The analysis of longitudinal panel data is central to empirical research on learning, development, aging, and the effects of interventions. Topics include: measurement of change, growth curve models, analysis of durations including survival analysis, experimental and non-experimental group comparisons, reciprocal effects, stability. Prerequisite: intermediate statistical methods
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Rogosa, D. (PI)

EDUC 355: Higher Education and Society

For undergraduates and graduate students interested in what colleges and universities do, and what society expects of them. The relationship between higher education and society in the U.S. from a sociological perspective. The nature of reform and conflict in colleges and universities, and tensions in the design of higher education systems and organizations.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Stevens, M. (PI)

EDUC 401A: Mini Courses in Methodology: Statistical Packages for the Social Sciences (SPSS)

Statistical analysis using SPSS, including generating descriptive statistics, drawing graphs, calculating correlation coefficients, conducting t-tests, analysis of variance, and linear regression. Building up datasets, preparing datasets for analysis, conducting statistical analysis, and interpreting results.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Stenhaug, B. (PI)

EDUC 401B: Mini Courses in Methodology: Stata

The goal of this course is to familiarize students with the Stata statistical software package for use in quantitative research. By the end of the course, students should be able to import and export data, clean and manage data, conduct standard statistical tests (e.g., correlation, t-test, regression), and produce a graph.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Stenhaug, B. (PI)

EDUC 401D: Multilevel Modeling Using R (STATS 196A)

See http://rogosateaching.com/stat196/ . Multilevel data analysis examples using R. Topics include: two-level nested data, growth curve modeling, generalized linear models for counts and categorical data, nonlinear models, three-level analyses.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Rogosa, D. (PI)

EFSLANG 683P: Workshop in Pronunciation for International Students

(1-2 units). Provides support in the development of clear, comprehensible English pronunciation. Includes attention to individual sounds as well as stress, rhythm, and intonation. Students taking the course for 3 units will have additional individual assignments and a 30-minute tutorial each week. Limited to visiting undergraduates and students in the High School Summer College program.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Geda, K. (PI)

EFSLANG 683R: Workshop in Reading and Vocabulary for International Students

(1-2 units). Provides support in the development of English reading skills for academic purposes, including work on comprehension, speed, and critical interpretation, along with strategies for improving vocabulary. Students taking the course for 2 units will have additional individual assignments and a 30-minute tutorial each week. Limited to visiting undergraduates and students in the High School Summer College program.
Terms: Sum | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: QUIJANO, L. (PI)
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