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1 - 10 of 39 results for: PUBLPOL ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

PUBLPOL 14: Navigating Financial Crises in the Modern Global Economy (ECON 14)

What causes financial crises? What are the keys to anticipating, preventing, and managing disruptions in the global financial system? This course prepares students to navigate future episodes as policymakers, finance professionals, and citizens by going inside the practical decisions made in an unfolding crisis, from the U.S. government and IMF to the boardroom and trading floor. Students will learn warning signs of distress; market structures that govern crisis dynamics; strategic interactions among the key actors; and lessons learned for creating a more resilient system. Concepts will be applied to real-world experiences in emerging market crises, the U.S. housing and global financial crisis, and the European sovereign crisis, as well as prospective risks from China's financial system and unwinding of extraordinary central bank stimulus.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Toloui, R. (PI)

PUBLPOL 101: Politics and Public Policy (AMSTUD 123X, POLISCI 102, PUBLPOL 201)

American political institutions (the Presidency, Congress, and the Court) and political processes (the formation of political attitudes and voting) have for some time now been criticized as inadequate to the task of making modern public policy. Against the backdrop of American culture and political history we examine how public policy has been and is being made. We use theories from Political Science and Economics to assess the state of the American system and the policy making process. We use case studies and lectures to analyze contemporary issues including environmental policy, taxes and spending , gun control , economic growth and inequality and mobility. In some of these issue areas we use comparative data from other countries to see how the U.S. is doing relative to other countries. In addition to class room lecture and discussion, student groups are formed to analyze policy issues of relevance to them. Undergraduate Public Policy students are required to enroll in this class for five units.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PUBLPOL 104: Economic Policy Analysis (ECON 150, PUBLPOL 204)

The relationship between microeconomic analysis and public policy making. How economic policy analysis is done and why political leaders regard it as useful but not definitive in making policy decisions. Economic rationales for policy interventions, methods of policy evaluation and the role of benefit-cost analysis, economic models of politics and their application to policy making, and the relationship of income distribution to policy choice. Theoretical foundations of policy making and analysis, and applications to program adoption and implementation. Prerequisites: ECON 50 and ECON 102B. Undergraduate Public Policy students are required to take this class for a letter grade and enroll in this class for five units.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Rosston, G. (PI)

PUBLPOL 105: Empirical Methods in Public Policy (PUBLPOL 205)

Methods of empirical analysis and applications in public policy. Emphasis on causal inference and program evaluation. Public policy applications include health, education, and labor. Assignments include hands-on data analysis, evaluation of existing literature, and a final research project. Objective is to obtain tools to 1) critically evaluate evidence used to make policy decisions and 2) perform empirical analysis to answer questions in public policy. Prerequisite: ECON 102B. Enrollment is limited to Public Policy students. Public Policy students must take the course for a letter grade.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PUBLPOL 106: Law and Economics (ECON 154, PUBLPOL 206)

This course explores the role of law in promoting well-being (happiness). Law, among its other functions, can serve as a mechanism to harmonize private incentives with cooperative gains, to maintain an equitable division of those gains, and to deter "cheating" and dystopia. Law is thus essential to civilization. Economic analysis of law focuses on the welfare-enhancing incentive effects of law and its enforcement and on law's role in reducing the risks of cooperation, achieved by fixing expectations of what courts or the state will do in various futures. Prerequisite: ECON 51 or PUBLPOL 51.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Owen, B. (PI)

PUBLPOL 115: Practical Training

Qualified Public Policy students obtain employment in a relevant research or industrial activity to enhance their professional experience consistent with their degree programs. Prior to enrolling students must get internship approved by the Public Policy Program. At the start of the quarter, students must submit a one page statement showing the relevance of the employment to the degree program along with an offer letter. At the end of the quarter, a three page final report must be supplied documenting work done and relevance to degree program. Meets the requirements for Curricular Practical Training for students on F-1 visas. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

PUBLPOL 122: Biosecurity and Bioterrorism Response (BIOE 122, EMED 122, EMED 222, PUBLPOL 222)

Overview of the most pressing biosecurity issues facing the world today. Guest lecturers have included former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, former Special Assistant on BioSecurity to Presidents Clinton and Bush Jr. Dr. Ken Bernard, Chief Medical Officer of the Homeland Security Department Dr. Alex Garza, eminent scientists, innovators and physicians in the field, and leaders of relevant technology companies. How well the US and global healthcare systems are prepared to withstand a pandemic or a bioterrorism attack, how the medical/healthcare field, government, and the technology sectors are involved in biosecurity and pandemic or bioterrorism response and how they interface, the rise of synthetic biology with its promises and threats, global bio-surveillance, making the medical diagnosis, isolation, containment, hospital surge capacity, stockpiling and distribution of countermeasures, food and agriculture biosecurity, new promising technologies for detection of bio-threats and countermeasures. Open to medical, graduate, and undergraduate students. No prior background in biology necessary. 4 units for twice weekly attendance (Mon. and Wed.); additional 1 unit for writing a research paper for 5 units total maximum.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PUBLPOL 129: Conversations on the Indian Economy

This course is intended to give students the opportunity to engage with Stanford faculty, across the University's different schools, who undertake research related to the modern Indian economy, including professors from the Humanities and Sciences, Engineering, GSB and schools of medicine, as well as from different research centers across the University. In addition, the course will feature conversations with several members of the Silicon Valley Community, as well as from India. The format is intended to promote discussion and debate, and to provide students an opportunity to learn about new developments and initiatives regarding India. Class meetings will be in the form of round-table interactions and exchanges.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Kochar, A. (PI)

PUBLPOL 135: Regional Politics and Decision Making in Silicon Valley and the Greater Bay Area

Dynamics of regional leadership and decision making in Silicon Valley, a complex region composed of 40 cities and four counties without any overarching framework for governance. Formal and informal institutions shaping outcomes in the region. Case studies include transportation, workforce development, housing and land use, and climate change.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PUBLPOL 143: Finance and Society for non-MBAs (ECON 143, MS&E 147, POLISCI 127A)

The financial system is meant to help people, businesses, and governments fund, invest, and manage risks, but it is rife with conflicts of interests and may allow people with more information and control to harm those with less of both. In this interdisciplinary course we explore the forces that shape the financial system and how individuals and society can benefit most from this system without being unnecessarily harmed and endangered. Topics include the basic principles of investment, the role and ¿dark side¿ of debt, corporations and their governance, banks and other financial institutions, why effective financial regulations are essential yet often fail, and political and ethical issues in finance. The approach will be rigorous and analytical but not overly technical mathematically. Prerequisite: Econ 1
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Admati, A. (PI)
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