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1 - 10 of 20 results for: IPS

IPS 200: The Social & Economic Impact of Artificial Intelligence (CS 22A)

Recent advances in computing may place us at the threshold of a unique turning point in human history. Soon we are likely to entrust management of our environment, economy, security, infrastructure, food production, healthcare, and to a large degree even our personal activities, to artificially intelligent computer systems. The prospect of "turning over the keys" to increasingly autonomous systems raises many complex and troubling questions. How will society respond as versatile robots and machine-learning systems displace an ever-expanding spectrum of blue- and white-collar workers? Will the benefits of this technological revolution be broadly distributed or accrue to a lucky few? How can we ensure that these systems respect our ethical principles when they make decisions at speeds and for rationales that exceed our ability to comprehend? What, if any, legal rights and responsibilities should we grant them? And should we regard them merely as sophisticated tools or as a newly emerging form of life? The goal of CS22 is to equip students with the intellectual tools, ethical foundation, and psychological framework to successfully navigate the coming age of intelligent machines.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Kaplan, J. (PI)

IPS 203: Issues in International Economics

Topics in international trade and international trade policy: trade, growth and poverty, the World Trade Organization (WTO), regionalism versus multilateralism, the political economy of trade policy, trade and labor, trade and the environment, and trade policies for developing economies. Prerequisite: ECON 51, ECON 166.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

IPS 209: Practicum

Applied policy exercises in various fields. Multidisciplinary student teams apply skills to a contemporary problem in a major international policy exercise with a public sector client such as a government agency. Problem analysis, interaction with the client and experts, and presentations. Emphasis is on effective written and oral communication to lay audiences of recommendations based on policy analysis. Enrollment must be split between Autumn and Winter Quarters for a total of 8 units.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1-8 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Stoner, K. (PI)

IPS 209A: IPS Master's Thesis

For IPS M.A. students only (by petition). Regular meetings with thesis advisers required.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-8 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Stoner, K. (PI)

IPS 210: The Politics of International Humanitarian Action

The relationship between humanitarianism and politics in international responses to civil conflicts and forced displacement. Focus is on policy dilemmas and choices, and the consequences of action or inaction. Case studies include northern Iraq (Kurdistan), Bosnia, Rwanda, Kosovo, and Darfur. In addition to class attendance, each student will meet with the instructor for multiple one-on-one sessions during the quarter.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Morris, E. (PI)

IPS 215: Special Topics: State-Society Relations in the Contemporary Arab World-Key Concepts and Debates (POLISCI 215A)

This course looks at key concepts pertaining to state-society relations in the Arab world as they have evolved in regional intellectual and political debates since the 1990s. Citizenship, minority rights, freedom of expression, freedom of association, the rule of law, government accountability, independence of the judiciary, civil-military relations, and democratic transition will be among the concepts discussed.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Hamzawy, A. (PI)

IPS 227: Finance and Society for non-MBAs (ECON 143, MS&E 147, POLISCI 127A, PUBLPOL 143)

The financial system is meant to help people, businesses, and governments fund, invest, and manage risks, but it is rife with conflicts of interests and may allow people with more information and control to harm those with less of both. In this interdisciplinary course we explore the forces that shape the financial system and how individuals and society can benefit most from this system without being unnecessarily harmed and endangered. Topics include the basic principles of investment, the role and ¿dark side¿ of debt, corporations and their governance, banks and other financial institutions, why effective financial regulations are essential yet often fail, and political and ethical issues in finance. The approach will be rigorous and analytical but not overly technical mathematically. Prerequisite: Econ 1
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

IPS 235: European Security Since World War Two (HISTORY 232C, HISTORY 332C, POLISCI 116A)

This course looks at European security during the Cold War and up to the present. There are many historical controversies to be examined, e.g. the enlargement of NATO, as well as theoretical and doctrinal debates, e.g. about extended deterrence and detente.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Holloway, D. (PI)

IPS 241: International Security in a Changing World (HISTORY 104D, POLISCI 114S)

This class examines the most pressing international security problems facing the world today: nuclear crises, nuclear non-proliferation, terrorism, and climate change. Alternative perspectives--from political science, history, and STS (Science, Technology, and Society) studies--are used to analyze these problems. The class includes an award-winning two-day international negotiation simulation.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

IPS 245: Does Google Need a Foreign Policy? Private Corporations & International Security in the Digital Age (PUBLPOL 245)

Facebook has more users than any nation has citizens. Apple CEO Tim Cook speaks more often with Chinese President Xi Jinping than President Trump does. Google's revenues exceed the GDPs of more than half the world's countries. Cybersecurity companies produce weapons that once only foreign governments wielded. These and other technology companies are increasingly caught in the maw of global politics whether it's entering challenging new foreign markets, developing platforms that enable millions of people around the world to organize for both noble and nefarious aims, or developing products that can become tools of intelligence agencies worldwide for surveillance, counterintelligence, and information warfare. In several respects, tech companies wield more power than governments. We examine the changing role of corporations in international politics, the role of the state, and critical challenges that large technology companies face today in particular. We discuss contending perspectives more »
Facebook has more users than any nation has citizens. Apple CEO Tim Cook speaks more often with Chinese President Xi Jinping than President Trump does. Google's revenues exceed the GDPs of more than half the world's countries. Cybersecurity companies produce weapons that once only foreign governments wielded. These and other technology companies are increasingly caught in the maw of global politics whether it's entering challenging new foreign markets, developing platforms that enable millions of people around the world to organize for both noble and nefarious aims, or developing products that can become tools of intelligence agencies worldwide for surveillance, counterintelligence, and information warfare. In several respects, tech companies wield more power than governments. We examine the changing role of corporations in international politics, the role of the state, and critical challenges that large technology companies face today in particular. We discuss contending perspectives about key issues with guest lectures by industry and US government leaders as well as simulations of foreign policy crises from the board room to the White House Situation Room. No background in political science or computer science is required. Admission based on application. Instructor consent required. See course notes for details.
Terms: offered occasionally | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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