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1 - 10 of 43 results for: EARTHSYS ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

EARTHSYS 11: Introduction to Geology (GS 1)

Why are earthquakes, volcanoes, and natural resources located at specific spots on the Earth surface? Why are there rolling hills to the west behind Stanford, and soaring granite walls to the east in Yosemite? What was the Earth like in the past, and what will it be like in the future? Lectures, hands-on laboratories, in-class activities, and one field trip will help you see the Earth through the eyes of a geologist. Topics include plate tectonics, the cycling and formation of different types of rocks, and how geologists use rocks to understand Earth's history.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Sperling, E. (PI)

EARTHSYS 24: Quick Capture and Questions: Practicing Natural History Through Watercolor

This course makes space to use art as an entry point for closer observation, deeper curiosity, and better understanding of natural systems. With a series of guest experts in art, science, and the practice of natural history, we will investigate the Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve through a number of lenses, microscopic to macroscopic. In each session, we will venture into the preserve to explore how field journaling, quick capture watercolor, and expressive language can mediate insight and sense of connection. Come build a community of practice with us! Apply at https://tinyurl.com/earthsys24 and direct further questions to Freya Chay (freyac@stanford.edu) and Hannah Black (hmcblack@stanford.edu).
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 38N: The Worst Journey in the World: The Science, Literature, and History of Polar Exploration (ESS 38N, GS 38N)

This course examines the motivations and experiences of polar explorers under the harshest conditions on Earth, as well as the chronicles of their explorations and hardships, dating to the 1500s for the Arctic and the 1700s for the Antarctic. Materials include The Worst Journey in the World by Aspley Cherry-Garrard who in 1911 participated in a midwinter Antarctic sledging trip to recover emperor penguin eggs. Optional field trip into the high Sierra in March.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Dunbar, R. (PI)

EARTHSYS 90: Introduction to Geochemistry (GS 90)

The chemistry of the solid earth and its atmosphere and oceans, emphasizing the processes that control the distribution of the elements in the earth over geological time and at present, and on the conceptual and analytical tools needed to explore these questions. The basics of geochemical thermodynamics and isotope geochemistry. The formation of the elements, crust, atmosphere and oceans, global geochemical cycles, and the interaction of geochemistry, biological evolution, and climate. Recommended: introductory chemistry.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Stebbins, J. (PI)

EARTHSYS 101: Energy and the Environment (ENERGY 101)

Energy use in modern society and the consequences of current and future energy use patterns. Case studies illustrate resource estimation, engineering analysis of energy systems, and options for managing carbon emissions. Focus is on energy definitions, use patterns, resource estimation, pollution. Recommended: MATH 21 or 42.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 104: The Water Course (GEOPHYS 70)

The Central Valley of California provides a third of the produce grown in the U.S., but has a desert climate, thus raising concerns about both food and water security. The pathway that water takes rainfall to the irrigation of fields (the water course) determines the quantity and quality of the available water. Working with various data sources (remote sensing, gauges, wells) allows us to model the water budget in the valley and explore the way in which recent droughts and increasing demand are impacting freshwater supplies.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 105A: Ecology and Natural History of Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve (BIO 105A)

Formerly 96A - Jasper Ridge Docent Training. First of two-quarter sequence training program to join the Jasper Ridge education/docent program. The scientific basis of ecological research in the context of a field station, hands-on field research, field ecology and the natural history of plants and animals, species interactions, archaeology, geology, hydrology, land management, multidisciplinary environmental education; and research projects, as well as management challenges of the preserve presented by faculty, local experts, and staff. Participants lead research-focused educational tours, assist with classes and research, and attend continuing education classes available to members of the JRBP community after the course.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Wilber, C. (PI)

EARTHSYS 111: Biology and Global Change (BIO 117, ESS 111)

The biological causes and consequences of anthropogenic and natural changes in the atmosphere, oceans, and terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems. Topics: glacial cycles and marine circulation, greenhouse gases and climate change, tropical deforestation and species extinctions, and human population growth and resource use. Prerequisite: Biology or Human Biology core or graduate standing.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Arrigo, K. (PI)

EARTHSYS 114: Environmental Change and Emerging Infectious Diseases (ANTHRO 177, ANTHRO 277, EARTHSYS 214, HUMBIO 114)

The changing epidemiological environment. How human-induced environmental changes, such as global warming, deforestation and land-use conversion, urbanization, international commerce, and human migration, are altering the ecology of infectious disease transmission, and promoting their re-emergence as a global public health threat. Case studies of malaria, cholera, hantavirus, plague, and HIV.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 125: Shades of Green: Redesigning and Rethinking the Environmental Justice Movements (CSRE 125E, EARTHSYS 225, URBANST 125)

Historically, discussions of race, ethnicity, culture, and equity in the environment have been relegated to the environmental justice movement, which often focuses on urban environmental degradation and remains separated from other environmental movements. This course will seek to break out of this limiting discussion. We will explore access to outdoor spaces, definitions of wilderness, who is and isn't included in environmental organizations, gender and the outdoors, how colonialism has influenced ways of knowing, and the future of climate change. The course will also have a design thinking community partnership project. Students will work with partner organizations to problem-solve around issues of access and diversity. We value a diversity of experiences and epistemological beliefs, and therefore undergraduates and graduate students from all disciplines are welcome.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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