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1 - 10 of 37 results for: COMM ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

COMM 104W: Reporting, Writing, and Understanding the News

Techniques of news reporting and writing. The value and role of news in democratic societies. Gateway class to journalism. Prerequisite for all COMM 177/277 classes. Limited enrollment. Preference to COMM majors.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

COMM 108: Media Processes and Effects (COMM 208)

(Graduate students register for COMM 208.) The process of communication theory construction including a survey of social science paradigms and major theories of communication. Recommended: 1 or PSYCH 1.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Harari, G. (PI)

COMM 113: Computational Methods in the Civic Sphere (COMM 213)

The widespread availability of public data provides a rich opportunity for those who can efficiently filter, interpret, and visualize information. Course develops necessary technical skills for data collection, analysis, and publication, including data mining and web visualization, with a focus on civic affairs and government accountability. Open to all majors and a range of technical skill levels. Involves tackling new tools and technical concepts in the pursuit of engaging, public-facing projects. (Graduate students enroll in 213). Prerequisite COMM 273D, CS 106A, or CS 106B.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Nguyen, D. (PI)

COMM 116: Journalism Law (COMM 216)

(Graduate students register for 216.) Laws and regulation impacting journalists. Topics include libel, privacy, news gathering, protection sources, fair trial and free press, theories of the First Amendment, and broadcast regulation. Prerequisite: Journalism M.A. student or advanced Communication major.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Wheaton, J. (PI)

COMM 135: Deliberative Democracy and its Critics (AMSTUD 135, COMM 235, COMM 335, POLISCI 234P, POLISCI 334P)

This course examines the theory and practice of deliberative democracy and engages both in a dialogue with critics. Can a democracy which emphasizes people thinking and talking together on the basis of good information be made practical in the modern age? What kinds of distortions arise when people try to discuss politics or policy together? The course draws on ideas of deliberation from Madison and Mill to Rawls and Habermas as well as criticisms from the jury literature, from the psychology of group processes and from the most recent normative and empirical literature on deliberative forums. Deliberative Polling, its applications, defenders and critics, both normative and empirical, will provide a key case for discussion.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Fishkin, J. (PI)

COMM 162: Campaigns, Voting, Media, and Elections (COMM 262, POLISCI 120B)

This course examines the theory and practice of American campaigns and elections. First, we will attempt to explain the behavior of the key players -- candidates, parties, journalists, and voters -- in terms of the institutional arrangements and political incentives that confront them. Second, we will use current and recent election campaigns as "laboratories" for testing generalizations about campaign strategy and voter behavior. Third, we examine selections from the academic literature dealing with the origins of partisan identity, electoral design, and the immediate effects of campaigns on public opinion, voter turnout, and voter choice. As well, we'll explore issues of electoral reform and their more long-term consequences for governance and the political process.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Iyengar, S. (PI)

COMM 164: The Psychology of Communication About Politics in America (COMM 264, POLISCI 124L, PSYCH 170)

Focus is on how politicians and government learn what Americans want and how the public's preferences shape government action; how surveys measure beliefs, preferences, and experiences; how poll results are criticized and interpreted; how conflict between polls is viewed by the public; how accurate surveys are and when they are accurate; how to conduct survey research to produce accurate measurements; designing questionnaires that people can understand and use comfortably; how question wording can manipulate poll results; corruption in survey research.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Krosnick, J. (PI)

COMM 171: Moving Pictures: Video Journalism for mobile and social platforms (COMM 271)

(Graduate students register for 271.) Examine video journalism¿s crucial role in digital news media across mobile and social media platforms. What are the specific needs of mobile platforms? How is new technology utilized to produce effective video news content? We'll examine case studies and hear from guest speakers about innovations in video journalism. Students produce short video journalism pieces using mobile tools, optimized for viewing on mobile devices. Prerequisite: Journalism MA student or instructor's consent.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

COMM 177C: Specialized Writing and Reporting: Environmental and Food System Journalism (COMM 277C, EARTHSYS 177C, EARTHSYS 277C)

Advanced reporting and writing course in the specific practices and standards of environmental journalism. This course begins with the assumption that students already know how to research and relay the essential facts of almost any environmental story. Students will go beyond the basics of journalistic practice, both as reporters and storytellers. Emphasis on magazine-style writing, with the goal of producing stories that stand on fact but move like fiction, that have protagonists and antagonists, that create suspense, that reveal character through dialogue and action, and that pay off with resonant finales. Limited enrollment: preference to students in the Earth Systems Master of Arts, Environmental Communication Program and the Graduate Journalism Program. Prerequisite: COMM 104, or EarthSys 191, or consent of instructor. Admission by application only, available from thayden@stanford.edu. Applications due Nov. 30. (Meets Earth Systems WIM requirement.)
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Hayden, T. (PI)

COMM 177D: Specialized Writing and Reporting: Narrative Journalism (COMM 277D)

(Graduate students register for COMM 277D.) How to report, write, edit, and read long-form narrative nonfiction, whether for magazines, news sites or online venues. Tools and templates of story telling such as scenes, characters, dialogue, and narrative arc. How the best long-form narrative stories defy or subvert conventional wisdom and bring fresh light to the human experience through reporting, writing, and moral passion. Prerequisite: 104 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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