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1 - 10 of 28 results for: CME ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

CME 100: Vector Calculus for Engineers (ENGR 154)

Computation and visualization using MATLAB. Differential vector calculus: analytic geometry in space, functions of several variables, partial derivatives, gradient, unconstrained maxima and minima, Lagrange multipliers. Introduction to linear algebra: matrix operations, systems of algebraic equations, methods of solution and applications. Integral vector calculus: multiple integrals in Cartesian, cylindrical, and spherical coordinates, line integrals, scalar potential, surface integrals, Green¿s, divergence, and Stokes¿ theorems. Examples and applications drawn from various engineering fields. Prerequisites: 10 units of AP credit (Calc BC with 5, or Calc AB with 5 or placing out of the single variable math placement test: https://exploredegrees-nextyear.stanford.edu/undergraduatedegreesandprograms/#aptextt), or Math 19-21.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CME 100A: Vector Calculus for Engineers, ACE

Students attend CME100/ENGR154 lectures with additional recitation sessions; two to four hours per week, emphasizing engineering mathematical applications and collaboration methods. Enrollment by department permission only. Prerequisite: must be enrolled in the regular CME100-01 or 02. Application at: https://engineering.stanford.edu/students/programs/engineering-diversity-programs/additional-calculus-engineers
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 6 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CME 102: Ordinary Differential Equations for Engineers (ENGR 155A)

Analytical and numerical methods for solving ordinary differential equations arising in engineering applications: Solution of initial and boundary value problems, series solutions, Laplace transforms, and nonlinear equations; numerical methods for solving ordinary differential equations, accuracy of numerical methods, linear stability theory, finite differences. Introduction to MATLAB programming as a basic tool kit for computations. Problems from various engineering fields. Prerequisite: 10 units of AP credit (Calc BC with 5, or Calc AB with 5 or placing out of the single variable math placement test: https://exploredegreesnextyear.stanford.edu/undergraduatedegreesandprograms/#aptextt),), or Math 19-21. Recommended: CME100.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CME 102A: Ordinary Differential Equations for Engineers, ACE

Students attend CME102/ENGR155A lectures with additional recitation sessions; two to four hours per week, emphasizing engineering mathematical applications and collaboration methods. Prerequisite: students must be enrolled in the regular section ( CME102) prior to submitting application at:n https://engineering.stanford.edu/students/programs/engineering-diversity-programs/additional-calculus-engineers
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 6 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Le, H. (PI)

CME 106: Introduction to Probability and Statistics for Engineers (ENGR 155C)

Probability: random variables, independence, and conditional probability; discrete and continuous distributions, moments, distributions of several random variables. Topics in mathematical statistics: random sampling, point estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, non-parametric tests, regression and correlation analyses; applications in engineering, industrial manufacturing, medicine, biology, and other fields. Prerequisite: CME 100/ENGR154 or MATH 51 or 52.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-AQR, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Khayms, V. (PI)

CME 108: Introduction to Scientific Computing (MATH 114)

Introduction to Scientific Computing Numerical computation for mathematical, computational, physical sciences and engineering: error analysis, floating-point arithmetic, nonlinear equations, numerical solution of systems of algebraic equations, banded matrices, least squares, unconstrained optimization, polynomial interpolation, numerical differentiation and integration, numerical solution of ordinary differential equations, truncation error, numerical stability for time dependent problems and stiffness. Implementation of numerical methods in MATLAB programming assignments. Prerequisites: MATH 51, 52, 53; prior programming experience (MATLAB or other language at level of CS 106A or higher).
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Dunham, E. (PI)

CME 151A: Interactive Data Visualization in D3

This four-week short course introduces D3, a powerful tool for creating interactive data visualizations on the web (d3js.org). The class is geared toward scientists and engineers who want to better communicate their personal projects and research through visualizations on the web. The class will cover the basics of D3: inputting data, creating scales and axes, and adding transitions and interactivity, as well as some of the most used libraries: stack, cluster and force layouts. The class will be based on short workshops and a final project. A background in programming methodology at the level of CS106A is assumed. The course will make use of Javascript, experience is recommended but not necessary.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CME 192: Introduction to MATLAB

This short course runs for the first four weeks/eight lectures of the quarter and is offered each quarter during the academic year. It is highly recommended for students with no prior programming experience who are expected to use MATLAB in math, science, or engineering courses. It will consist of interactive lectures and application-based assignments.nThe goal of the short course is to make students fluent in MATLAB and to provide familiarity with its wide array of features. The course covers an introduction of basic programming concepts, data structures, and control/flow; and an introduction to scientific computing in MATLAB, scripts, functions, visualization, simulation, efficient algorithm implementation, toolboxes, and more.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Gerrard, D. (PI)

CME 193: Introduction to Scientific Python

This short course runs for the first four weeks of the quarter. It is recommended for students who are familiar with programming at least at the level of CS106A and want to translate their programming knowledge to Python with the goal of becoming proficient in the scientific computing and data science stack. Lectures will be interactive with a focus on real world applications of scientific computing. Technologies covered include Numpy, SciPy, Pandas, Scikit-learn, and others. Topics will be chosen from Linear Algebra, Optimization, Machine Learning, and Data Science. Prior knowledge of programming will be assumed, and some familiarity with Python is helpful, but not mandatory.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CME 204: Partial Differential Equations in Engineering (ME 300B)

Geometric interpretation of partial differential equation (PDE) characteristics; solution of first order PDEs and classification of second-order PDEs; self-similarity; separation of variables as applied to parabolic, hyperbolic, and elliptic PDEs; special functions; eigenfunction expansions; the method of characteristics. If time permits, Fourier integrals and transforms, Laplace transforms. Prerequisite: CME 200/ ME 300A, equivalent, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Lele, S. (PI)
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