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1 - 10 of 37 results for: ARTSTUDI ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

ARTSTUDI 139: Portraiture and Facial Anatomy for Artists (SURG 241)

Focus is on the art of portraiture and underlying structures of the face, fundamental anatomical elements such as the skull and muscles of facial expressions, and the intersections between human anatomy and art. Studio sessions incorporate plastic models, dry bones, cadaveric specimens, and live models. Encourages use of proper anatomical terminology for describing structures and their relationships.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

ARTSTUDI 140: Drawing I

Functional anatomy and perspective as they apply to problems of drawing the form in space. Individual and group instruction as students work from still life set-ups, nature, and the model. Emphasis is on the development of critical skills and perceptual drawing techniques for those with little or no previous experience with pastels, inks, charcoal, conte, and pencil. Lectures alternate with studio work. (lower level)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 144B: Eye for Color: Interaction of Color

This course will explore different types of color phenomenon through cutting and arranging colored paper and mixing paint. The goal of the course is to enhance sensitivity to color relationships. There is no such thing as a bad color or a good color, it is all relative to context. Students in this course will gain the ability to recognize and identify different types of color phenomena that exist in art and nature. The development of observation and articulation when dealing with color comes from experience, trial and error, and in doing so, one develops an individual eye for color.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 145: Painting I

Introduction to techniques, materials, and vocabulary in oil painting. Still life, landscape, and figure used as subject matter. Emphasis is on painting and drawing from life. (lower level)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 146B: Art of Reclamation

This course explores reclamation, the rich process of claiming something back or reasserting a right. Through the layering of different materials to create compositions of text and image, this course will explore what the art of reclamation means at an individual, group, and community level. Can mixed media art spark intersectional dialogue? How does combining disparate materials communicate radical messages to others? Through group discussions, readings, writing sessions, and critiques we will explore the topics of the body, race, gender, and land as they relate to art practice. Students will be encouraged to experiment with two and three-dimensional approaches to four main projects. Demonstrations will consist of collage, stenciling, and image making via paint, ink, and charcoal.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 148A: Lithography

The classic technique of printing from limestones. Techniques to draw an image on the stone, etch and fix the image on the stone, and print it in numbered editions. Students work on a variety of stone sizes. Field trips to local publishers of lithography or lithography exhibitions. (lower level)
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Kain, K. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 151: Sculpture I

Traditional and non-traditional approaches to sculpture production through working with materials including wood, metal, and plaster. Conceptual and technical skills, and safe and appropriate use of tools and materials. Impact of material and technique upon form and content; the physical and expressive possibilities of diverse materials. Historical and contemporary forming methods provide a theoretical basis for studio work. Field trips; guest lecturers.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 160: Intro to Digital / Physical Design

Contemporary production processes ¿ both manufacturing and media processes ¿ often span the digital and the physical. 3D Depth cameras can scan real world models or movements, which can be manipulated or adjusted digitally, then re-output to the physical world via a myriad of 2D and 3D printing and laser cutting technologies. Crowd sourced information is uploaded to social media, which in turn guides our physical meeting places. Google street-view maps our physical world, and augmented reality displays overlay it. How as artists or designers to we grapple with and use this digital / physical permeability to create new experiences and meaning for our current time? This introductory studio course explores various tool sets as well as artists working across these genres. This course is a good baseline exploration for anyone interested in designing or making art with emerging contemporary tools.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Odell, J. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 165: Social Media and Performative Practices

How can social media, mobile applications, or other more traditional media be used to engage people in new social situations? Could you design an app that gets people to talk with strangers (Miranda July), or a poster that causes a revolt in an office space (Packard Jennings), or a truck that changes how people think about nursing mothers (Jill Miller)? What about platforms that encourage political dialog or social changes? This studio course examines how contemporary artists and designers engage people in a process of social dialog, critique and political change through the existing media and non-traditional art practices.nnWith the constant development of new apps and social media platforms and the pressure from society of everyone having an online presence, the class will investigate and focus specifically on how these tools can be used as a resource to create and present artworks creatively. The students in this class will be introduced to a variety of artwork examples and study di more »
How can social media, mobile applications, or other more traditional media be used to engage people in new social situations? Could you design an app that gets people to talk with strangers (Miranda July), or a poster that causes a revolt in an office space (Packard Jennings), or a truck that changes how people think about nursing mothers (Jill Miller)? What about platforms that encourage political dialog or social changes? This studio course examines how contemporary artists and designers engage people in a process of social dialog, critique and political change through the existing media and non-traditional art practices.nnWith the constant development of new apps and social media platforms and the pressure from society of everyone having an online presence, the class will investigate and focus specifically on how these tools can be used as a resource to create and present artworks creatively. The students in this class will be introduced to a variety of artwork examples and study different artist¿s approach to media, technically as well as conceptually. Experimentation is highly emphasized throughout this course, as the goal is for the students to create and produce works that uses social media in new ways to tell stories, connect with, mystify or surprise the audience.nnA selection of software such as Photoshop, Premiere Pro, After Affects, and other tools will be introduced in class that will assist the students in producing work for the required assignments.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Miller, J. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 168: Data as Material

How can data be used as ¿material¿ in art and design projects. Beyond straight-forward ideas of ¿data-visualization¿, this studio course seeks to investigate how we construct meaning from sets of information, and how the construction of those sets determines the meaning itself. This course also investigates different display aesthetics and how this is also a strategy for generating meaning. Artists studied include those who use various forms of personal, public, and social data as part of their practice. Historical examples from conceptual artists and other genres are considered along with contemporary artists working with data in digital or hybrid digital/physical formats.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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