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1 - 10 of 13 results for: ARCHLGY ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

ARCHLGY 1: Introduction to Archaeology (ANTHRO 3)

Aims, methods, and data in the study of human society's development from early hunters through late prehistoric civilizations. Archaeological sites and remains characteristic of the stages of cultural development for selected geographic areas, emphasizing methods of data collection and analysis appropriate to each.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Bauer, A. (PI)

ARCHLGY 34: Animals and Us (ANTHRO 34)

The human-animal relationship is dynamic, all encompassing and durable. Without exception, all socio-cultural groups have evidenced complex interactions with the animals around them, both domesticated and wild. However, the individual circumstances of these interactions are hugely complicated, and involve much more than direct human-animal contact, going far beyond this to incorporate social, ecological and spiritual contexts.n This course delves into this complexity, covering the gamut of social roles played by animals, as well as the methods and approaches to studying these, both traditional and scientific. While the notion of `animals as social actors¿ is well acknowledged, their use as proxies for human autecology (the relationship between a species and its environment) is also increasingly recognized as a viable mechanism for understanding our cultural and economic past. It will piece together the breadth of human-animal relationships using a wide geographic range of case studies.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Seetah, K. (PI)

ARCHLGY 81: Introduction to Roman Archaeology (CLASSICS 52)

(Formerly CLASSART 81.) This course will introduce you to the material culture of the ancient Roman world, from spectacular imperial monuments in the city of Rome to cities and roads around the Mediterranean, from overarching environmental concerns to individual human burials, from elite houses and army forts to the the lives of slaves, freedmen and gladiators. Key themes will be change and continuity over time; the material, spatial and visual workings of power; how Roman society was materially changed by its conquests and how conquered peoples responded materially to Roman rule.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARCHLGY 97: Archaeology Internship

Opportunity for students to pursue their specialization in an institutional setting such as a laboratory, clinic, research institute, museums or government agency. May be repeated for credit. Prior instructor consent needed.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Hodge, C. (PI)

ARCHLGY 103: History of Archaeological Thought

Introduction to the history of archaeology and the forms that the discipline takes today, emphasizing developments and debates over the past five decades. Historical overview of culture, historical, processual and post-processual archaeology, and topics that illustrate the differences and similarities in these theoretical approaches.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Meskell, L. (PI)

ARCHLGY 119: Zooarchaeology: An Introduction to Faunal Remains (ANTHRO 119, ANTHRO 219)

As regularly noted, whether historic or pre-historic, animal bones are often the most commonly occurring artefacts on archaeological sites. As bioarchaeological samples, they offer the archaeologist an insight into food culture, provisioning, trade and the social aspects of human-animal interactions. The course will be taught through both practical and lecture sessions: the `hands-on¿ component is an essential complement to the lectures. The lectures will offer grounding in the main methodological approaches developed, as well as provide case-studies to illustrate where and how the methods have been applied. The practical session will walk students through the skeletal anatomy of a range of species. It will guide students on the identification of different parts of the animal, how to age / sex individuals, as well as recognize taphonomic indicators and what these mean to reconstructing post-depositional modifications.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Seetah, K. (PI)

ARCHLGY 126: Archaeobotany (ARCHLGY 226)

Archaeobotany, also known as paleoethnobotany, is the study of the interrelationships of plants and humans through the archaeological record. Knowledge and understanding of Archaeobotany sufficient to interpret, evaluate, and understand archaeobotanical data. Dominant approaches in the study of archaeobotanical remains: plant macro-remains, pollen, phytoliths, and starch grains in the identification of diet and environmental reconstruction.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Levin, M. (PI)

ARCHLGY 147B: World Heritage in Global Conflict (ANTHRO 147B, ANTHRO 247B)

Heritage is always political, it is typically said. Such a statement might refer to the everyday politics of local stakeholder interests on one end of the spectrum, or the volatile politics of destruction and erasure of heritage during conflict, on the other. If heritage is always political then one might expect that the workings of World Heritage might be especially fraught given the international dimension. In particular, the intergovernmental system of UNESCO World Heritage must navigate the inherent tension between state sovereignty and nationalist interests and the wider concerns of a universal regime. The World Heritage List has over 1000 properties has many such contentious examples, including sites in Iraq, Mali, Syria, Crimea, Palestine and Cambodia. As an organization UNESCO was born of war with an explicit mission to end global conflict and help the world rebuild materially and morally, but has found it¿s own history increasingly entwined with that of international politics and violence.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Meskell, L. (PI)

ARCHLGY 190: Archaeology Directed Reading/Independent Study

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARCHLGY 195: Independent Study/Research

Students conducting independent study and or research with archaeology faculty members.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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