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1 - 10 of 14 results for: SOC

SOC 11SC: Inequality and Poverty in the United States (CSRE 10SC)

Social inequality is a feature of all advanced industrial societies. However, some societies have more inequality than others, and some types of inequality are more prominent in some societies than in others. Inequality in the United States is greater than in many other industrialized nations and has increased dramatically in the past forty years. Economic inequality, for example, is greater today than any time since the 1920s. Growing public awareness of this inequality has sparked a vigorous debate among politicians and public protests in city streets; some that have turned violent. The Occupy Movement was driven largely by resentment against the growing concentration of economic privilege within a small segment of society. Inequality was a prominent theme in the Bernie Sanders presidential campaign. Despite these debates and protests, there is no consensus about whether anything should be done to stem this trend. nThis class will focus on three domains of inequality in the United St more »
Social inequality is a feature of all advanced industrial societies. However, some societies have more inequality than others, and some types of inequality are more prominent in some societies than in others. Inequality in the United States is greater than in many other industrialized nations and has increased dramatically in the past forty years. Economic inequality, for example, is greater today than any time since the 1920s. Growing public awareness of this inequality has sparked a vigorous debate among politicians and public protests in city streets; some that have turned violent. The Occupy Movement was driven largely by resentment against the growing concentration of economic privilege within a small segment of society. Inequality was a prominent theme in the Bernie Sanders presidential campaign. Despite these debates and protests, there is no consensus about whether anything should be done to stem this trend. nThis class will focus on three domains of inequality in the United States: social class, gender, and racial inequality. The assigned reading and discussions will examine theories and research about the origins of social inequality; how inequality and poverty is reproduced over time; the consequences of inequality and poverty; and what might be done to reduce inequality and poverty in American society. Students will be expected to help lead and participate in class discussions, and to complete a weekly assignment based on the readings. nnIn addition to the in-class instruction, students will have an opportunity to engage in public service activities directly related to poverty and inequality. Students will work with the Director of Community Engaged Learning (DCEL) from the Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity who will assist with their participation in activities connected with social service agencies in the area, including agencies that deal with homelessness, food insecurity, and other needs.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Snipp, C. (PI)

SOC 118D: Ice Cream Sales Don't Cause Shark Attacks: Debunking Pseudoscience and Conducting Good Research

Conducting good research requires careful design and analysis, but much of the research we consume from media and political outlets often presents spurious correlations as causal relationships. What do we need to do and why to rule out spuriousness? The focus will be on using our intuition about what information we would need to properly answer questions about social life. We will find that apparently complicated statistical tests are simply following the same logic necessary to reach conclusions about social science's most interesting questions.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Munoz, J. (PI)

SOC 119D: The Power of Social Networks in Everyday Life

Why do some people have better ideas than others? Why are some more likely to be bullied in school, get a job, or catch a disease? Why do some innovations, apps, rumors, or revolutions spread like a wildfire, while others never get off the ground? Why are Facebook, Twitter, Instagram or Spotify so good at recommending people, news, pictures, or songs we might know or like? What do a power outage, the collapse of the Roman Empire, a human stroke, and the Financial Crisis of 2008 have in common? What explains the success of Silicon Valley? And why are there only six (or less) people between us and any other human on this planet? While these questions may seem totally unrelated to each other on first glance, they can all be explored with the help of a single, yet powerful framework: social network analysis. In this class, you will learn to see the world as a web of relations: not only are people, ideas/concepts and things all increasingly connected to each other; the pattern of these rela more »
Why do some people have better ideas than others? Why are some more likely to be bullied in school, get a job, or catch a disease? Why do some innovations, apps, rumors, or revolutions spread like a wildfire, while others never get off the ground? Why are Facebook, Twitter, Instagram or Spotify so good at recommending people, news, pictures, or songs we might know or like? What do a power outage, the collapse of the Roman Empire, a human stroke, and the Financial Crisis of 2008 have in common? What explains the success of Silicon Valley? And why are there only six (or less) people between us and any other human on this planet? While these questions may seem totally unrelated to each other on first glance, they can all be explored with the help of a single, yet powerful framework: social network analysis. In this class, you will learn to see the world as a web of relations: not only are people, ideas/concepts and things all increasingly connected to each other; the pattern of these relations can tell us a great deal about many phenomena in our social world that defy traditional explanations. At the end of this class, you will not only see networks everywhere; you will have taken a big step toward connecting some of the dots in (y)our world: this is the power of thinking in relations.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Hahn, M. (PI)

SOC 190: Undergraduate Individual Study

Prior arrangement required.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SOC 191: Undergraduate Directed Research

Work on a project of student's choice under supervision of a faculty member. Prior arrangement required.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SOC 192: Undergraduate Research Apprenticeship

Work in an apprentice-like relationship with faculty on an on-going research project. Prior arrangement required.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SOC 193: Undergraduate Teaching Apprenticeship

Prior arrangement required.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

SOC 196: Senior Thesis

Work on an honors thesis project under faculty supervision (see description of honors program). Must be arranged early in the year of graduation or before.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SOC 384: New Models and Methods in the Social Sciences

Two-week intensive introduction to new statistical approaches. Emphasis is on applications. Topics may include network models, multilevel models, latent class models, mixed methods, new qualitative methods, growth models, geostatistical tools, survey-based experiments, new methods for estimating causal effects, web-based surveys, advanced discrete choice models, and diffusion models.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SOC 390: Graduate Individual Study

May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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