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1 - 10 of 10 results for: MI

MI 27SC: Viruses in the News

Viruses are unique biological entities that resemble both living and inanimate objects. Despite their simple structure they include some of the most devastating and ubiquitous causes of human disease. The compelling nature of this topic is illustrated by the recent Ebola epidemic, which emerged coincident with the last time this class was offered. From smallpox to measles to HIV to the common cold, viruses have literally changed the course of human history and impacted evolution. They have also been important experimental tools for probing the molecular nature of key biological processes, and they have been utilized in many key discoveries and Nobel Prize-winning research programs. In books, movies, newspapers, and electronic feeds, viruses continue to make the news on a daily basis. Using contemporary media, content experts, model building, interactive sessions, and field trips, we will explore the essential nature of viruses, what makes them unique, how they are classified, how they more »
Viruses are unique biological entities that resemble both living and inanimate objects. Despite their simple structure they include some of the most devastating and ubiquitous causes of human disease. The compelling nature of this topic is illustrated by the recent Ebola epidemic, which emerged coincident with the last time this class was offered. From smallpox to measles to HIV to the common cold, viruses have literally changed the course of human history and impacted evolution. They have also been important experimental tools for probing the molecular nature of key biological processes, and they have been utilized in many key discoveries and Nobel Prize-winning research programs. In books, movies, newspapers, and electronic feeds, viruses continue to make the news on a daily basis. Using contemporary media, content experts, model building, interactive sessions, and field trips, we will explore the essential nature of viruses, what makes them unique, how they are classified, how they cause disease, key molecular processes, breakthroughs in prevention and treatment, current efforts in trying to eradicate viruses, and cultural iconography pertaining to viruses. In short, this seminar is intended to go viral. Sophomore College course, applications required, due at noon on April 5, 2016. Apply at http://soco.stanford.edu .
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MI 198: Directed Reading in Microbiology and Immunology

Fields of study are decided in consultation with sponsoring professor. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MI 199: Undergraduate Research

Investigations sponsored by individual faculty members. Possible fields: microbial molecular biology and physiology, microbial pathogenicity, immunology, virology, and molecular parasitology. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MI 215T: Teaching Virology

This course focuses on the pedagogy surrounding virology instruction. The course focuses on educational principles and uses a variety of formats including lectures, discussion, with emphasis on hands-on experience in the form of a teaching practicum. Topics includes syllabus organization, problem set, exam writing, grading rubrics, active learning, model building, stimulation discussion , the use of online media and evaluation.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MI 218: Computational Analysis of Biological Information: Introduction to Python for Biologists (GENE 218, PATH 218)

Computational tools for processing, interpretation, communication, and archiving of biological information. Emphasis is on sequence and digital microscopy/image analysis. Intended for biological and clinical trainees without substantial programming experience.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MI 299: Directed Reading in Microbiology and Immunology

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MI 370: Medical Scholars Research

Provides an opportunity for student and faculty interaction, as well as academic credit and financial support, to medical students who undertake original research. Enrollment is limited to students with approved projects.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 4-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

MI 399: Graduate Research

Students who have completed the necessary foundation courses undertake investigations in general bacteriology, bacterial physiology and ecology, bacterial genetics, microbial pathogenicity, immunology, parasitology, or virology sponsored by individual faculty members. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MI 801: TGR Master's Project

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: TGR

MI 802: TGR PhD Dissertation

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: TGR
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