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51 - 60 of 86 results for: CS

CS 273B: Deep Learning in Genomics and Biomedicine (BIODS 237, BIOMEDIN 273B, GENE 236)

Recent breakthroughs in high-throughput genomic and biomedical data are transforming biological sciences into "big data" disciplines. In parallel, progress in deep neural networks are revolutionizing fields such as image recognition, natural language processing and, more broadly, AI. This course explores the exciting intersection between these two advances. The course will start with an introduction to deep learning and overview the relevant background in genomics and high-throughput biotechnology, focusing on the available data and their relevance. It will then cover the ongoing developments in deep learning (supervised, unsupervised and generative models) with the focus on the applications of these methods to biomedical data, which are beginning to produced dramatic results. In addition to predictive modeling, the course emphasizes how to visualize and extract interpretable, biological insights from such models. Recent papers from the literature will be presented and discussed. Stude more »
Recent breakthroughs in high-throughput genomic and biomedical data are transforming biological sciences into "big data" disciplines. In parallel, progress in deep neural networks are revolutionizing fields such as image recognition, natural language processing and, more broadly, AI. This course explores the exciting intersection between these two advances. The course will start with an introduction to deep learning and overview the relevant background in genomics and high-throughput biotechnology, focusing on the available data and their relevance. It will then cover the ongoing developments in deep learning (supervised, unsupervised and generative models) with the focus on the applications of these methods to biomedical data, which are beginning to produced dramatic results. In addition to predictive modeling, the course emphasizes how to visualize and extract interpretable, biological insights from such models. Recent papers from the literature will be presented and discussed. Students will be introduced to and work with popular deep learning software frameworks. Students will work in groups on a final class project using real world datasets. Prerequisites: College calculus, linear algebra, basic probability and statistics such as CS109, and basic machine learning such as CS229. No prior knowledge of genomics is necessary.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

CS 274: Representations and Algorithms for Computational Molecular Biology (BIOE 214, BIOMEDIN 214, GENE 214)

Topics: introduction to bioinformatics and computational biology, algorithms for alignment of biological sequences and structures, computing with strings, phylogenetic tree construction, hidden Markov models, basic structural computations on proteins, protein structure prediction, protein threading techniques, homology modeling, molecular dynamics and energy minimization, statistical analysis of 3D biological data, integration of data sources, knowledge representation and controlled terminologies for molecular biology, microarray analysis, machine learning (clustering and classification), and natural language text processing. Prerequisite: CS 106B; recommended: CS161; consent of instructor for 3 units.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

CS 279: Computational Biology: Structure and Organization of Biomolecules and Cells (BIOE 279, BIOMEDIN 279, BIOPHYS 279, CME 279)

Computational techniques for investigating and designing the three-dimensional structure and dynamics of biomolecules and cells. These computational methods play an increasingly important role in drug discovery, medicine, bioengineering, and molecular biology. Course topics include protein structure prediction, protein design, drug screening, molecular simulation, cellular-level simulation, image analysis for microscopy, and methods for solving structures from crystallography and electron microscopy data. Prerequisites: elementary programming background ( CS 106A or equivalent) and an introductory course in biology or biochemistry.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 300: Departmental Lecture Series

Priority given to first-year Computer Science Ph.D. students. CS Masters students admitted if space is available. Presentations by members of the department faculty, each describing informally his or her current research interests and views of computer science as a whole.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CS 309A: Cloud Computing Seminar

For science, engineering, computer science, business, education, medicine, and law students. Cloud computing is bringing information systems out of the back office and making it core to the entire economy. Furthermore with the advent of smarter machines cloud computing will be integral to building a more precision planet. This class is intended for all students who want to begin to understand the implications of this technology. Guest industry experts are public company CEOs who are either delivering cloud services or using cloud services to transform their businesses.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Chou, T. (PI)

CS 315B: Parallel Computing Research Project

Advanced topics and new paradigms in parallel computing including parallel algorithms, programming languages, runtime environments, library debugging/tuning tools, and scalable architectures. Research project. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 325B: Data for Sustainable Development (EARTHSYS 162, EARTHSYS 262)

The sustainable development goals (SDGs) encompass many important aspects of human and ecosystem well-being that are traditionally difficult to measure. This project-based course will focus on ways to use inexpensive, unconventional data streams to measure outcomes relevant to SDGs, including poverty, hunger, health, governance, and economic activity. Students will apply machine learning techniques to various projects outlined at the beginning of the quarter. The main learning goals are to gain experience conducting and communicating original research. Prior knowledge of machine learning techniques, such as from CS 221, CS 229, CS 231N, STATS 202, or STATS 216 is required. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students. Enrollment limited to 24. Students must apply for the class by filling out the form at https://goo.gl/forms/9LSZF7lPkHadix5D3. A permission code will be given to admitted students to register for the class.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 326: Topics in Advanced Robotic Manipulation

This course provides a survey of the most important and influential concepts in autonomous robotic manipulation. It includes classical concepts that are still widely used and recent approaches that have changed the way we look autonomous manipulation. We cover approaches towards motion planning and control using visual and tactile perception as well as machine learning. This course is especially concerned with new approaches for overcoming challenges in generalization from experience, exploration of the environment, and learning representation so that these methods can scale to real problems. Students are expected to present one paper in a tutorial, debate a paper once from the Pro and once from the Con side. They are also expected to propose an original research project and work on it towards a research paper. Recommended: CS 131, 223A, 229 or equivalents.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 331B: Representation Learning in Computer Vision

A representation performs the task of converting an observation in the real world (e.g. an image, a recorded speech signal, a word in a sentence) into a mathematical form (e.g. a vector). This mathematical form is then used by subsequent steps (e.g. a classifier) to produce the outcome, such as classifying an image or recognizing a spoken word. Forming the proper representation for a task is an essential problem in modern AI. In this course, we focus on 1) establishing why representations matter, 2) classical and moderns methods of forming representations in Computer Vision, 3) methods of analyzing and probing representations, 4) portraying the future landscape of representations with generic and comprehensive AI/vision systems over the horizon, and finally 5) going beyond computer vision by talking about non-visual representations, such as the ones used in NLP or neuroscience. The course will heavily feature systems based on deep learning and convolutional neural networks. We will hav more »
A representation performs the task of converting an observation in the real world (e.g. an image, a recorded speech signal, a word in a sentence) into a mathematical form (e.g. a vector). This mathematical form is then used by subsequent steps (e.g. a classifier) to produce the outcome, such as classifying an image or recognizing a spoken word. Forming the proper representation for a task is an essential problem in modern AI. In this course, we focus on 1) establishing why representations matter, 2) classical and moderns methods of forming representations in Computer Vision, 3) methods of analyzing and probing representations, 4) portraying the future landscape of representations with generic and comprehensive AI/vision systems over the horizon, and finally 5) going beyond computer vision by talking about non-visual representations, such as the ones used in NLP or neuroscience. The course will heavily feature systems based on deep learning and convolutional neural networks. We will have several teaching lectures, a number of prominent external guest speakers, as well as presentations by the students on recent papers and their projects. nnRequired Prerequisites: CS131A, CS231A, CS231B, or CS231N. If you do not have the required prerequisites, please contact a member of the course staff before enrolling in this course.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 332: Advanced Survey of Reinforcement Learning

This class will provide a core overview of essential topics and newnresearch frontiers in reinforcement learning. Planned topics include:nmodel free and model based reinforcement learning, policy search, MontenCarlo Tree Search planning methods, off policy evaluation, exploration,nimitation learning, temporal abstraction/hierarchical approaches, safetynand risk sensitivity, human-in-the-loop RL, inverse reinforcementnlearning, learning to communicate, and insights from human learning.nStudents are expected to create an original research paper on a relatedntopic. Prerequisites: CS221 or AA238/CS238 or CS234 or CS229 or similarnexperience.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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