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71 - 80 of 110 results for: CHINA

CHINA 257: Science, Power, and Knowledge: East Asia to 1900 (CHINA 157, HISTORY 294J, JAPAN 157, JAPAN 257, KOREA 157, KOREA 257)

In the early modern period, East Asian societies featured long-established institutions of learning and traditions of knowledge. This course examines the relationship between knowledge and power in East Asia societies prior to 1900. It explores how knowledge production operated in late imperial China (1550-1900), Chos'n Korea (1392-1910), and Tokugawa Japan (1600-1868). Among the themes addressed are: the state's role in patronizing science and knowledge; major intellectual movements; engagement with Western science and religion; East Asian statecraft; and East Asian understandings of space and geography. nTaking a holistic perspective, it places science and technology in 1) a social and cultural context 2) in relation to other bodies and fields of knowledge 3) in comparison to other societies in a similar historical time period. A socially embedded perspective on knowledge and science seeks to appreciate how politics, society, and knowledge are integrated, and in particular how scienc more »
In the early modern period, East Asian societies featured long-established institutions of learning and traditions of knowledge. This course examines the relationship between knowledge and power in East Asia societies prior to 1900. It explores how knowledge production operated in late imperial China (1550-1900), Chos'n Korea (1392-1910), and Tokugawa Japan (1600-1868). Among the themes addressed are: the state's role in patronizing science and knowledge; major intellectual movements; engagement with Western science and religion; East Asian statecraft; and East Asian understandings of space and geography. nTaking a holistic perspective, it places science and technology in 1) a social and cultural context 2) in relation to other bodies and fields of knowledge 3) in comparison to other societies in a similar historical time period. A socially embedded perspective on knowledge and science seeks to appreciate how politics, society, and knowledge are integrated, and in particular how science and knowledge can be both instruments and sites of political power. By exploring these links, the course will also illustrate how our modern disciplinary categories of natural science,social science and the humanities cannot be taken for granted and the areas of knowledge they cover can be deeply intertwined. nnThe course will also address these issues historically and across geographic regions in East Asia and beyond. The comparative lens and frameworks these perspectives can offer will bring an awareness of the diverse traditions of knowledge production in East Asia. Its examination of East Asian encounters with Western paradigms of knowledge throughout the early modern period will also illustrate how communication occurs across cultural, social, and linguistic barriers and how diverse world-views were managed in these encounters. These encounters of knowledge-exchange between Jesuit missionaries, Ming literati, Korean aristocrats, and Japanese doctors also show how cultural identities were constructed, reinforced, and challenged. These identities, expressed through the mastery of knowledge, are essential for understanding how East Asian reckoned with growing pressures to adopt Western industrial technology and military science in the late nineteenth century.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CHINA 258: Cultural Images in China-US Relations (CHINA 158)

New interpretation of the history of China-U.S. relations, 1784-2008, using image studies. Attention to people-to-people communication, cultural interaction, and political imagination during different times and power structures. Discussion of change and continuity of cultural images in textual descriptions, visual materials, symbolic and virtual identities in historical context. Understand how people in China and the United States created, presented, interpreted, and remembered cultural images of each other and how these images affected and were affected by their foreign policies and bilateral relations.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CHINA 259: Beijing and Shanghai: Twin Cities in Chinese History (CHINA 159)

This course discusses a story of twin cities ¿ Beijing and Shanghai, from the imperial period to the present day. The historical movement of people, goods, knowledge, thoughts, technology and shifting of political power and cultural authority has closely linked the two cities together. No other two cities in the Chinese map have more communications, interactions, and mutual influences than Beijing and Shanghai. Indeed, geographic localities, ethnic traits, material lives, and foreign contacts have produced distinct cultural landscapes and patterns of urban development of the twin cities, which provide us with a good case of comparative studies. In Beijing and Shanghai, contemporary forces, including migration, industrialization, marketization, decentralization and globalization are transforming the urban societies. Both of them take center stage in China¿s drama of explosive growth and unprecedented changes. They continue to compete and influence each other in many ways.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CHINA 260: Classical Poetry: Reading, Theory, Interpretation (CHINA 160)

Introduction to the reading and interpretation of classical Chinese poetry, with attention to the language of poetry, aesthetics, expressive purposes, and social roles. Readings in Chinese. Prerequisite: three years of modern Chinese or equivalent.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Egan, R. (PI)

CHINA 261: Soldiers and Bandits in Chinese Culture (CHINA 161)

Social roles and literary images of two groups on the margins of traditional Chinese society; historical and comparative perspectives.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CHINA 262: Lyrical and Local Prose (CHINA 162)

Informal and personal prose of Tang and Song dynasties, with special attention to lyrical expression (prose as close alternative to poetry) and local interest (e.g., in travel diaries). These new uses and styles of prose will be compared with more formal expository prose and with poetry written by the same authors, to better understand the distribution of expressive aims and effects. Prerequisite: Classical Chinese or advanced reading knowledge of Chinese.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CHINA 263: Chinese Biographies of Women (CHINA 163)

Generic and historical analysis of the two-millennia long biographical tradition inaugurated by Liu Xiang, ca. 79-8 B.C.E. Chinese women's history, intellectual history, historiography, and literary studies.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Zhou, Y. (PI)

CHINA 264: Classical Chinese Rituals (CHINA 164)

Meanings of rituals regarding death, wedding, war, and other activities; historical transformations of classical rituals throughout the premodern period; legacy of the Chinese ritual tradition. Sources include canonical texts.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CHINA 265: Major Figures in Classical Chinese Poetry (CHINA 165)

Focus is on a major poet and relationships to previous and later poetry. Poetic form, including meter and rhyme schemes. Historical context. This year's poet is Du Fu. Prerequisite: 3 years Modern Chinese or equivalent..
Terms: given next year | Units: 4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CHINA 266: Chinese Ci Poetry (Song Lyrics) (CHINA 166)

Introduction to poetry in the ci "song lyrics" form. This year the focus is on song lyrics of Li Qingzhao (1084-1150s), read against song lyrics composed by male writers of her day. Attention to the special challenges she faced as a woman writer, and the ways that the tradition struggled to accommodate this "talented woman." Prerequisite: Classical Chinese or advanced reading knowledge of Chinese.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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