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61 - 70 of 110 results for: CHINA

CHINA 213: Love, Passion, and Politics in Chinese Film (CHINA 113, COMPLIT 104)

Focusing on the emotional structure of love and passion in Chinese films, the course will investigate the structures of feelings and moral relations in modern Chinese history from the 1940s till the present. Examining the interplay between private desire, romantic sentiment, family relations, and political passion, we will explore how men and women in China grapple with emotional and social issues in modern transformations. We will consider romantic love, the uplifting of sexuality into political passion, the intertwining of aesthetic experience with politics, nostalgia in the disenchanted modern world, and the tensions between the individual¿s self-realization and the community¿s agenda. Students will learn to ¿read¿ films as a work of art and understand how film works as expression of desire, impulse, emotional connections, and communal bonding during times of crisis. Course work includes a midterm exam (25%) and a final exam (25%), a weekly 250-300 word reflection on the film of the more »
Focusing on the emotional structure of love and passion in Chinese films, the course will investigate the structures of feelings and moral relations in modern Chinese history from the 1940s till the present. Examining the interplay between private desire, romantic sentiment, family relations, and political passion, we will explore how men and women in China grapple with emotional and social issues in modern transformations. We will consider romantic love, the uplifting of sexuality into political passion, the intertwining of aesthetic experience with politics, nostalgia in the disenchanted modern world, and the tensions between the individual¿s self-realization and the community¿s agenda. Students will learn to ¿read¿ films as a work of art and understand how film works as expression of desire, impulse, emotional connections, and communal bonding during times of crisis. Course work includes a midterm exam (25%) and a final exam (25%), a weekly 250-300 word reflection on the film of the week (10%), participation and oral presentation in class (10%), and a paper of 5-7 pages to be submitted after the midterm week (30%).nnStarting from the second week, film screening will begin 6: 30 pm Monday before classes on Tuesday and Thursday. The course does not encourage private viewing. At least 5 dinners will be provided for movie-screening events.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CHINA 215: Sex, Gender, and Power in Modern China (CHINA 115, FEMGEN 150, FEMGEN 250)

Investigates how sex, gender, and power are entwined in the Chinese experience of modernity. Topics include anti-footbinding campaigns, free love/free sex, women's mobilization in revolution and war, the new Marriage Law of 1950, Mao's iron girls, postsocialist celebrations of sensuality, and emergent queer politics. Readings range from feminist theory to China-focused historiography, ethnography, memoir, biography, fiction, essay, and film. All course materials are in English.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CHINA 216: Chinese Cultural Revolution: Performance, Politics, and Aesthetics (CHINA 116, COMPLIT 135)

Events, arts, films, and operas of the Chinese Cultural Revolution. Analysis of political passion, aesthetics, and psychology of mass movements. Places the Cultural Revolution in the long-range context of art, social movements, and politics. Chinese language is not required.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CHINA 244: Science, Magic, and Religion in Early China (CHINA 144)

If the categories we use to think about the world are products of particular cultural and historical experiences, what happens when we bring the categories of the modern West to bear on early China? In this seminar, we will examine early Chinese technologies designed to achieve ethical, physical, or political transformation, and technologies designed to interpret signs, in terms of three classical anthropological categories: science, magic, and religion. How may we apply science, magic, and religion to early China, and what problems might we encounter in doing so? What alternative terms do our sources present, and what questions might they allow us to ask? How was knowledge created in early China, and how do our categories shape the knowledge we create about early China?
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CHINA 251: Popular Culture and Casino Capitalism in China (CHINA 151)

Examination of different forms of Chinese popular culture used to gauge or control fate and uncertainty, from geomancy and qigong to ghost culture and mahjong. Ways in which Chinese are incorporating these cultural forms into the informal economy to get rich quick: rotating credit associations, stock market speculation, pyramid schemes, underground lotteries, counterfeiting. Impact of casino capitalism on Chinese culture and social life today.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Festa, P. (PI)

CHINA 252: Gods, Ghosts, and Ancestors: Anthropology of Chinese Folk Religion (CHINA 152)

Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CHINA 253: Chinese Bodies, Chinese Selves (CHINA 153)

Interdisciplinary. The body as a contested site of representational practices, identity politics, cultural values, and social norms. Body images, inscriptions, and practices in relation to health, morality, gender, sexuality, nationalism, consumerism, and global capitalism in China and Taiwan. Sources include anthropological, literary, and historical studies, and fiction and film. No knowledge of Chinese required.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Festa, P. (PI)

CHINA 254: What is Chinese Theater? The Formation of a Tradition (CHINA 154)

A survey of Chinese drama from its origins to late imperial China. Explores theories of the origins of Chinese drama, contrasting theories with the documented beginnings of theater and its first texts. How traditions turned into "elite theater" in the Ming and Qing dynasties, and how esthetic norms and moral values went into the process of theatrical transformation.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CHINA 255: The Culture of Entertainment in China (CHINA 155)

Sophisticated, organized entertainment in China is evident at least as early as nnthe second century B.C. in the court spectacles described in the early histories nnand in the depictions of jugglers, dancers and acrobats represented in tomb nnbas-reliefs. The importance attached to entertainment from ancient times both at court and in society at large is manifest not just in the establishment of nnimperial institutions such as the Music Bureau, but also in the appearance of nnlarge entertainment districts within the cities where people would invest nnextraordinary amount of resources in the pursuit of pleasure, and in small scale nngatherings. This class will look at the representation of play and pleasure in nnChinese culture from a variety of sources (art, history, literature and nnperformance) in different periods of Chinese history. In the process we will nnaddress the place of pleasure in Chinese culture, as well as ethical, socio-nnpolitical and economical concerns. Held in old Knight Bldg., 521 Memorial Way, Rm. 102.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CHINA 256: Sino-Korean Relations, Past and Present (CHINA 156, HISTORY 292J, KOREA 156, KOREA 256)

Korea and China have long been intertwined in their political, economic, and cultural histories. The depth of this historical relationship has enormous ramifications for East Asia today. This course will investigate the history of Korea-China relations from its deep roots in the ancient past, through its formative periods in the early modern period and the age of imperialism, to the contemporary era. Topics to be covered include formation of Chinese and Korean national identity, Sino-Korean cultural exchange, premodern Chinese empire in East Asia, China and Korea in the wake of Western and Japanese imperialism, communist revolutions in East Asia, the Korean War, and China's relations with a divided Korea in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Particular attention will be paid to how the modern and contemporary ramifications of past historical relations and how contemporary Chinese and Koreans interpret their own and each others' pasts.nThis course will ask students to engage with diverse interpretations of the past and to consider how a common history is interpreted by different audiences and for different purposes. What are the implications of divergent memories of a single historical event for Chinese and Korean political, cultural, and ethnic identities? How are political, cultural, and ethnic identities constructed through engagement with difference? And what is at stake in different constructions of identity?In addressing these issues, students will also engage in social inquiry. They will be asked to understand how political ideology, economic organization, and social forces have shaped the character of Sino-Korean relations. What are the economic and political institutions that influence these relations in each time period? How do ideologies like Confucianism, Communism, or free-market liberalism interface with Chinese and Korean societies and impact their relations?
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Wang, S. (PI)
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