2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

11 - 20 of 25 results for: CARDCOURSES::eng ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

EE 46: Engineering For Good: Save the World and Have Fun Doing It

Projects that provide immediate and positive impact on the world. Focus is on global health by learning from experts in this field. Students work on real-world projects with help from members of NGOs and social entrepreneurial companies as part of the hand-on learning experience. Prerequisite: ENGR 40 or EE 122A or CS 106B or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Le, M. (PI)

ENGR 110: Perspectives in Assistive Technology (ENGR 110) (ENGR 210)

Seminar and student project course. Explores the medical, social, ethical, and technical challenges surrounding the design, development, and use of technologies that improve the lives of people with disabilities and older adults. Guest lecturers include engineers, clinicians, and individuals with disabilities. Field trips to local facilities, an assistive technology faire, and a film screening. Students from any discipline are welcome to enroll. 3 units for students (juniors, seniors, and graduate students preferred) who pursue a team-based assistive technology project with a community partner - enrollment limited to 24. 1 unit for seminar attendance only (CR/NC) or individual project (letter grade). Total enrollment limited to classroom capacity of 50. Projects can be continued as independent study in Spring Quarter. See http://engr110.stanford.edu/. Designated a Cardinal Course by the Haas Center for Public Service.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Jaffe, D. (PI)

ENGR 119: Community Engagement Preparation Seminar (ENGR 219)

This seminar is designed for engineering students who have already committed to an experiential learning program working directly with a community partner on a project of mutual benefit. This seminar is targeted at students participating in the Summer Service Learning Program offered through Stanford¿s Global Engineering Program.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Credit/No Credit

ENGR 210: Perspectives in Assistive Technology (ENGR 110) (ENGR 110)

Seminar and student project course. Explores the medical, social, ethical, and technical challenges surrounding the design, development, and use of technologies that improve the lives of people with disabilities and older adults. Guest lecturers include engineers, clinicians, and individuals with disabilities. Field trips to local facilities, an assistive technology faire, and a film screening. Students from any discipline are welcome to enroll. 3 units for students (juniors, seniors, and graduate students preferred) who pursue a team-based assistive technology project with a community partner - enrollment limited to 24. 1 unit for seminar attendance only (CR/NC) or individual project (letter grade). Total enrollment limited to classroom capacity of 50. Projects can be continued as independent study in Spring Quarter. See http://engr110.stanford.edu/. Designated a Cardinal Course by the Haas Center for Public Service.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Jaffe, D. (PI)

ENGR 219: Community Engagement Preparation Seminar (ENGR 119)

This seminar is designed for engineering students who have already committed to an experiential learning program working directly with a community partner on a project of mutual benefit. This seminar is targeted at students participating in the Summer Service Learning Program offered through Stanford¿s Global Engineering Program.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Credit/No Credit

FEMGEN 99: Seeds of Change

This course is a required training for student leaders of the Seeds of Change initiative. This initiative takes an interdisciplinary approach to STEM education, infusing students¿ technical training with leadership training through a lens of gender inequality - bringing together key components of feminist pedagogy, service-learning, and experiential education to create a transformational learning experience. In this three-quarter course (Fall, Winter, Spring), student leaders will: learn the core content featured in the Seeds of Change curriculum, reflect on their experiences as both learners and teachers of this content, hone their own leadership and group facilitation skills, and engage as researchers in the initiative¿s evaluation efforts. NOTE: Instructor Consent Required. Please email kpedersen@stanford.edu
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ME 105: Designing for Impact

This course will introduce the design thinking process and skills, and explore unique challenges of solving problems and initiating action for public good. Design skills such as need-finding, insight development, and prototyping will be learned through project work, with a particular emphasis on the elements required to be effective in the social sector. Prerequisite: ME101.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ME 177: Global Engineers' Education

A project based course for those who would like to use their engineering backgrounds to address real world challenges faced by underserved communities globally. In direct collaboration with an underserved community from a rural village in India, students will develop engineering solutions to the challenge of sanitation and hygiene. Focus will be on working with the community rather than for them. Concepts covered will include designing with what designers care about at the center, articulating and realizing individual and community aspirations, ethics of engaging with underserved communities, and methodology of working sustainably with an underserved community.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

MS&E 108: Senior Project

Restricted to MS&E majors in their senior year. Students carry out a major project in groups of four, applying techniques and concepts learned in the major. Project work includes problem identification and definition, data collection and synthesis, modeling, development of feasible solutions, and presentation of results. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center). Satisfies the WIM requirement for MS&E majors.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

MS&E 297: "Hacking for Defense": Solving National Security issues with the Lean Launchpad

In a crisis, national security initiatives move at the speed of a startup yet in peacetime they default to decades-long acquisition and procurement cycles. Startups operate with continual speed and urgency 24/7. Over the last few years they¿ve learned how to be not only fast, but extremely efficient with resources and time using lean startup methodologies. In this class student teams will take actual national security problems and learn how to apply ¿lean startup¿ principles, ("business model canvas," "customer development," and "agile engineering¿) to discover and validate customer needs and to continually build iterative prototypes to test whether they understood the problem and solution. Teams take a hands-on approach requiring close engagement with actual military, Department of Defense and other government agency end-users. Team applications required in February. Limited enrollment. Course builds on concepts introduced in MS&E 477.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints