2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

51 - 60 of 131 results for: HISTORY ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

HISTORY 224A: The Soviet Civilization (HISTORY 424A, REES 224A)

Socialist visions and practices of the organization of society and messianic politics; the Soviet understanding of mass violence, political and ethnic; and living space. Primary and secondary sources. Research paper or historiographical essay.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 224C: Genocide and Humanitarian Intervention (HISTORY 324C, JEWISHST 284C, JEWISHST 384C, PEDS 224)

Open to medical students, graduate students, and undergraduate students. Traces the history of genocide in the 20th century and the question of humanitarian intervention to stop it, a topic that has been especially controversial since the end of the Cold War. The pre-1990s discussion begins with the Armenian genocide during the First World War and includes the Holocaust and Cambodia under the Khmer Rouge in the 1970s. Coverage of genocide and humanitarian intervention since the 1990s includes the wars in Bosnia, Rwanda, Kosovo, the Congo and Sudan.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

HISTORY 226E: Famine in the Modern World (HISTORY 326E, PEDS 226)

Open to medical students, graduate students, and undergraduate students. Examines the major famines of modern history, the controversies surrounding them, and the reasons that famine persists in our increasingly globalized world. Focus is on the relative importance of natural, economic, and political factors as causes of famine in the modern world. Case studies include the Great Irish Famine of the 1840s; the Bengal famine of 1943-44; the Soviet famines of 1921-22 and 1932-33; China's Great Famine of 1959-61; the Ethiopian famines of the 1970s and 80s, and the Somalia famines of the 1990s and of 2011.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

HISTORY 227D: All Quiet on the Eastern Front? East Europe and Russia in the First World War (HISTORY 327D, REES 227, REES 327)

Until recently history has been comparatively quiet about the experience of World War I in the east. Far from being a peripheral theater of war, however, the experiences of war on the Eastern Front were central to shaping the 20th century. Not only was the first shot of the war fired in the east, it was also the site of the most dramatic political revolution. Using scholarly texts, literature and film, this course combines political, military, cultural and social approaches to introduce the causes, conduct and consequences of World War I with a focus on the experiences of soldiers and civilians on the Eastern Front. Topics include: the war of movement, occupation, extreme violence against civilians, the Armenian genocide, population exchanges, the Russian Revolution and civil war, and the disintegration of empires and rise of nation-states.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Knezevic, J. (PI)

HISTORY 229A: Nationhood and Belonging: Poles and Jews (HISTORY 329A, JEWISHST 289A, JEWISHST 389A)

Examines changing conceptions of nationhood in Poland, late-19th century to present, with focus on place of Jews in Polish society. What conditions fostered the early political sense of the nation? Why was it replaced with integral nationalism, and for some, fascism? How did Jews relate to their homeland? Emphasis on post-1918 history: impact of independence, Great Depression, West European fascism, World War II, imposition of communist rule, and collapse of the Soviet Bloc. Considers current Polish-Jewish relations.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Jolluck, K. (PI)

HISTORY 230C: Paris: Capital of the Modern World (FRENCH 140, FRENCH 340, URBANST 184)

This course explores how Paris, between the eighteenth and twentieth centuries, became the political, cultural, and artistic capital of the modern world. It considers how the city has both shaped and been shaped by the tumultuous events of modern history- class conflict, industrialization, imperialism, war, and occupation. It will also explore why Paris became the major world destination for intellectuals, artists and writers. Sources will include films, paintings, architecture, novels, travel journals, and memoirs.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Daughton, J. (PI)

HISTORY 232C: European Security Since World War Two (HISTORY 332C, IPS 235, POLISCI 116A)

This course looks at European security during the Cold War and up to the present. There are many historical controversies to be examined, e.g. the enlargement of NATO, as well as theoretical and doctrinal debates, e.g. about extended deterrence and detente.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Holloway, D. (PI)

HISTORY 238D: Germany and the World Wars, 1870-1990 (HISTORY 338D, JEWISHST 288D, JEWISHST 388D)

(Students who have taken History 38A/138A should not enroll in this course.) This course examines Germany's tumultuous history from the Second Empire through the end of the Cold War. During this time, Germany ushered in five regimes and two world wars, seesawing between material ruin and economic prosperity on the frontline of Europe's military and ideological rifts. Beginning with Bismarck's wars of unification, the class spans World War One, the Weimar Republic, the rise of Nazism, World War Two, the Holocaust, the division of communist East and capitalist West Germany, and the fall of the Iron Curtain.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Sheffer, E. (PI)

HISTORY 240: The History of Evolution (BIO 340, HISTORY 340)

This course examines the history of evolutionary biology from its emergence around the middle of the eighteenth century. We will consider the continual engagement of evolutionary theories of life with a larger, transforming context: philosophical, political, social, economic, institutional, aesthetic, artistic, literary. Our goal will be to achieve a historical rich and nuanced understanding of how evolutionary thinking about life has developed to its current form.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Riskin, J. (PI)

HISTORY 240G: Science and Empire, 1500-1900 (HISTORY 340G)

During the scientific revolution of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, European states carved out vast colonial empires in Asia, Africa, and the Americas. How did empires make science and how did science make empires? In this course, we will explore the history of the global exchange of people, objects, and knowledge. We will consider how early modern science, medicine, and technology helped create global empires, while emerging across the division of the world into "the West and the rest."
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Statman, A. (PI)
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints