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41 - 50 of 131 results for: HISTORY

HISTORY 190: Early Chinese Thought (HISTORY 90)

This lecture course examines the emergence of critical thought in early China. After a brief study of the social and political changes that made this emergence possible, it looks at the nature and roles of the thinkers, and finally their ideas about the social order, the state, war and the army, the family, the cosmos, and the self (both physical and mental). Some brief comparisons with early Greek thought.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Lewis, M. (PI)

HISTORY 194B: Japan in the Age of the Samurai

(Same as HISTORY 94B. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 194B.) From the Warring States Period to the Meiji Restoration. Topics include the three great unifiers, Tokugawa hegemony, the samurai class, Neoconfucian ideologies, suppression of Christianity, structures of social and economic control, frontiers, the other and otherness, castle-town culture, peasant rebellion, black marketing, print culture, the floating world, National Studies, food culture, samurai activism, black ships, unequal treaties, anti-foreign terrorism, restorationism, millenarianism, modernization as westernization, Japan as imagined community.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 201K: A History of the Global Left: Revolutionary Movements against Empire (HISTORY 301K)

This class will trace the formation of trans-regional movements against imperialism in the modern period that helped create a "global Left." We will read contemporary works by thinkers such as Lord Byron, Karl Marx, Mohandas K. Gandhi, Annie Besant, and Faiz Ahmad Faiz, as well as historical studies of these figures and the movements in which they figured. Key topics include the American Revolution, the Indian "Mutiny" of 1857, the Ghadar movement, Pan-Islamism, Irish nationalism, and global communism.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Satia, P. (PI)

HISTORY 202J: Climate Change Controversies: Past, Present, Future (IPS 271)

Provides a unique perspective on contemporary debates about climate change through a study of their long history. After some background about climate science and a look at how people thought about climate in the 18th, 19th, and early 20th centuries, we explore the co-evolution of climate science and climate politics from World War II to the present. The approach is to examine a series of political issues and debates that established human effects on the global atmosphere as serious problems. We then focus on the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change, the 2015 Paris Agreement, and the future of international climate policy. Assignments include in-class presentations and a policy brief.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Edwards, P. (PI)

HISTORY 203K: Trauma and History (CSRE 203H)

This course will examine trauma as a historical process, following the intergenerational impacts of history's darker dramas, analyzing collective strategies for coping and healing after trauma, and asking whether we can speak of "traumatized societies." Short readings and weekly discussions.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Stokes, L. (PI)

HISTORY 206B: Intoxicated: Commodities & Globalization in the Early Modern World (HISTORY 306B)

Early modern Europe experienced an influx of foreign goods, including coffee, sugar, chocolate, tea, and drugs, that ushered in a new era of global commerce. Yet, these developments also had consequences: the large-scale enslavement and relocation of human beings and the violent subjugation of local populations in the name of empire. A wider range of goods from far-flung places entered the grasp of a larger swath of society, but from where, by what means, and at what cost?
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Dorner, Z. (PI)

HISTORY 206E: CAPITALS: How Cities Shape Cultures, States, and People (COMPLIT 100, DLCL 100, FRENCH 175, GERMAN 175, ILAC 175, ITALIAN 175, URBANST 153)

This course takes students on a trip to eight capital cities, at different moments in time: Renaissance Florence, Golden Age Madrid, Colonial Mexico City, Enlightenment and Romantic Paris, Existential and Revolutionary St. Petersburg, Roaring Berlin, Modernist Vienna, and bustling Buenos Aires. While exploring each place in a particular historical moment, we will also consider the relations between culture, power, and social life. How does the cultural life of a country intersect with the political activity of a capital? How do large cities shape our everyday experience, our aesthetic preferences, and our sense of history? Why do some cities become cultural capitals? Primary materials for this course will consist of literary, visual, sociological, and historical documents (in translation); authors we will read include Boccaccio, Lope de Vega, Sor Juana, Montesquieu, Baudelaire, Dostoyevsky, Irmgard Keun, Freud, and Borges. Note: To be eligible for WAYS credit, you must take the course for a minimum of 3 Units and a Letter Grade.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 208A: Science and Law in History (HISTORY 308A)

How the intertwined modern fields of science and law, since the early modern period, together developed central notions of fact, evidence, experiment, demonstration, objectivity, and proof.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Riskin, J. (PI)

HISTORY 209C: Liberalism and Violence (HISTORY 309C)

Does LIberalism have a theory of violence? What does modern political thought, in privileging humanity and rights, share with "terrorists" and "rogue states?" How is liberalism transformed by the use of religion and death for political ends? We read key thinkers of modern life- Adorno, Arendt, Agamben, Benjamin, Derrida, Fanon, Foucault, Gandhi, Heidegger, and Schmitt- to interrogate the relationship between religion, sacrifice, and democracy. At the center are connections between war and modern life, and between violence and non-violence.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-ER, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Kumar, A. (PI)

HISTORY 209S: Research Seminar for Majors

Required of History majors. How to conduct original, historical research and analysis, including methods such as using the libraries and archives at Stanford and elsewhere, and working collaboratively to frame topics, identify sources, and develop analyses. Autumn quarter focuses on gender, race, sexuality and History of Science; Winter quarter on early modern travel and Europe before 1500; Spring quarter on American political history and open topic.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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