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111 - 120 of 131 results for: HISTORY

HISTORY 371: Graduate Colloquium: Explorations in Latin American History and Historiography (ILAC 371)

Introduction to modern Latin American history and historiography, including how to read and use primary sources for independent research.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Frank, Z. (PI)

HISTORY 376K: The Nature State: Latin American Conservation in Global Perspective (HISTORY 276K)

This colloquium studies the history of conservation as a way to understand (territorial) state formation. It examines Latin America from a global perspective by comparing case studies from around the world. It examines how various political arrangements allowed for nature protection, the creation and functioning of institutions and bureaucracies in charge of protected areas, what these developments tell us about citizenship, the role of science in state formation, and the implications of different environments in the building of national territories.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 383: Middle East Oil and Global Economy (HISTORY 283)

The class studies Middle East oil in the global economy using the method of political economy. Topics addressed include: origins of the Middle East oil industry; the Seven Sisters international oil cartel; Aramco and the U.S.-Saudi alliance; the post-World War II petroleum order; petroleum, the crisis of 1971-82, and the rise of a new regime of capital accumulation regulated neo-liberal economic orthodoxy and "Washington Consensus" policies- commonly referred to as "globalization" since the 1990s.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Beinin, J. (PI)

HISTORY 385A: Core Colloquium in Jewish History, 17th-19th Centuries (JEWISHST 385A)

Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Rodrigue, A. (PI)

HISTORY 385B: Graduate Colloquium in Modern Jewish History (JEWISHST 385B)

Instructor consent required.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 385C: Jews in the Contemporary World: Faith and Ethnicity, Vulnerability and Visibility (CSRE 185B, HISTORY 185B, JEWISHST 185B, REES 185B)

(Same as HISTORY 85B.) This course explores the full expanse of Jewish life today and in the recent past. The inner workings of religious faith, the content of Jewish identify shorn of belief, the interplay between Jewish powerlessness and influence, the myth and reality of Jewish genius, the continued pertinence of antisemitism, the rhythms of Jewish economic life ¿ all these will be examined in weekly lectures, classroom discussion, and with the use of a widely diverse range of readings, films, and other material. Explored in depth will the ideas and practices of Zionism, the content of contemporary secularism and religious Orthodoxy, the impact Holocaust, the continued crisis facing Israel and the Palestinians. Who is to be considered Jewish, in any event, especially since so many of the best known (Spinoza, Freud, Marx) have had little if anything to do with Jewish life with their relationships to it indifferent, even hostile?
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 391J: East Asian Environmental History (HISTORY 291J)

Traversing 2,500 years of history, this colloquium begins with conceptions of nature, agricultural time, and agriculture in ancient East Asia, proceeds to look closely at the environmental history of China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam, and then concludes with environmental issues in East Asia from a contemporary perspective.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Brown, T. (PI)

HISTORY 391K: Korean History and Culture before 1900 (HISTORY 291K, KOREA 158, KOREA 258)

This course serves as an introduction to Korean culture, society, and history before the modern period. It begins with a discussion of early Korea and controversies over Korean origins; the bulk of the course will be devoted to the Chos'n period (1392-1910), that from the end of medieval Korea to the modern period. Topics to be covered include: Korean national and ethnic origins, the role of religious and intellectual traditions such as Buddhism and Confucianism, popular and indigenous religious practices, the traditional Korean family and social order, state and society during the Chos'n dynasty, vernacular prose literature, Korean's relations with its neighbors in East Asia, and changing conceptions of Korean identity.nThe course will be conducted through the reading and discussion of primary texts in English translation alongside scholarly research. As such, it will emphasize the interpretation of historical sources, which include personal letters, memoirs, and diaries, traditional more »
This course serves as an introduction to Korean culture, society, and history before the modern period. It begins with a discussion of early Korea and controversies over Korean origins; the bulk of the course will be devoted to the Chos'n period (1392-1910), that from the end of medieval Korea to the modern period. Topics to be covered include: Korean national and ethnic origins, the role of religious and intellectual traditions such as Buddhism and Confucianism, popular and indigenous religious practices, the traditional Korean family and social order, state and society during the Chos'n dynasty, vernacular prose literature, Korean's relations with its neighbors in East Asia, and changing conceptions of Korean identity.nThe course will be conducted through the reading and discussion of primary texts in English translation alongside scholarly research. As such, it will emphasize the interpretation of historical sources, which include personal letters, memoirs, and diaries, traditional histories, diplomatic and political documents, along with religious texts and works of art. Scholarly work will help contextualize these materials, while the class discussions will introduce students to existing scholarly debates about the Korean past. Students will be asked also to examine the premodern past with an eye to contemporary reception. The final project for the class is a film study, where a modern Korean film portraying premodern Korea will be analyzed as a case study of how the past works in public historical memory in contemporary Korea, both North and South. An open-ended research paper is also possible, pending instructor approval.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Wang, S. (PI)

HISTORY 392D: Japan in Asia, Asia in Japan (HISTORY 292D)

How Japan and Asia mutually shaped each other in the late 19th and 20th centuries. Focus is on Japanese imperialism in Asia and its postwar legacies. Topics include: pan-Asianism and orientalism; colonial modernization in Korea and Taiwan; collaboration and resistance; popular imperialism in Manchuria; total war and empire; comfort women and the politics of apology; the issue of resident Koreans; and economic and cultural integration of postwar Asia.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Uchida, J. (PI)

HISTORY 395F: Race and Ethnicity in East Asia (ASNAMST 295F, CSRE 295F, HISTORY 295F)

Intensive exploration of major issues in the history of race and ethnicity in China, Japan, and Korea from the early modern period to the present day.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Mullaney, T. (PI)
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