2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

101 - 110 of 131 results for: HISTORY ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

HISTORY 340: The History of Evolution (BIO 340, HISTORY 240)

This course examines the history of evolutionary biology from its emergence around the middle of the eighteenth century. We will consider the continual engagement of evolutionary theories of life with a larger, transforming context: philosophical, political, social, economic, institutional, aesthetic, artistic, literary. Our goal will be to achieve a historical rich and nuanced understanding of how evolutionary thinking about life has developed to its current form.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Riskin, J. (PI)

HISTORY 340G: Science and Empire, 1500-1900 (HISTORY 240G)

During the scientific revolution of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, European states carved out vast colonial empires in Asia, Africa, and the Americas. How did empires make science and how did science make empires? In this course, we will explore the history of the global exchange of people, objects, and knowledge. We will consider how early modern science, medicine, and technology helped create global empires, while emerging across the division of the world into "the West and the rest."
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Statman, A. (PI)

HISTORY 341D: Einstein and the Structure of Reality (HISTORY 241D)

Albert Einstein once remarked "One cannot help but be in awe when one contemplates the mysteries of the marvelous structure of reality. It is enough if one tries to contemplate only a little of this mystery each day." In this course we will contemplate the history, science, and philosophy involved in three pathbreaking and contentious episodes in Einstein's lifelong quest to unveil the structure of reality: the special theory of relativity, the general theory of relativity, and the quantum theory.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 349: Bodies, Technologies, and Natures in Africa (AFRICAST 249, ANTHRO 348B)

This interdisciplinary course explores how modern African histories, bodies, and natures have been entangled with technological activities. Viewing Africans as experts and innovators, we consider how technologies have mediated, represented, or performed power in African societies. Topics include infrastructure, extraction, medicine, weapons, communications, sanitation, and more. Themes woven through the course include citizenship, mobility, labor, bricolage, in/formal economies, and technopolitical geographies, among others. Readings draw from history, anthropology, geography, and social/cultural theory.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Hecht, G. (PI)

HISTORY 351C: Core in American History, Part III

Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Campbell, J. (PI)

HISTORY 352B: History of American Law (HISTORY 152)

(Formerly Law 318. Now Law 3504.) This course examines the growth and development of American legal institutions with particular attention to crime and punishment, slavery and race relations, the role of law in developing the economy, and the place of lawyers in American society, from colonial times to the present. Special Instructions: Any student may write a paper in lieu of the final exam with consent of instructor. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Elements used in grading: Final exam or paper. Automatic grading penalty waived for writers. Cross-listed with History ( HISTORY 152 Consent of instructor required) & ( HISTORY 352B).
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Friedman, L. (PI)

HISTORY 356G: Constructing Race and Religion in America (AFRICAAM 236, AMSTUD 246, CSRE 246, HISTORY 256G, RELIGST 246, RELIGST 346)

This seminar focuses on the interrelationships between social constructions of race, and social interpretations of religion in America. How have assumptions about race shaped religious worldviews? How have religious beliefs shaped racial attitudes? How have ideas about religion and race contributed to notions of what it means to be "American"? We will look at primary and secondary sources, and at the historical development of ideas and practices over time.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Lum, K. (PI)

HISTORY 357: Was the American Revolution a Social Revolution? (HISTORY 257)

What kind of a revolution was the American Revolution? The revolution gave colonial Americans political independence from Britain to found the United States. But did the revolution also transform American society in its wake? This course explores how historians and historical participants alike have answered this question paying attention to historical changes (or lack thereof) that took place in American society between c. 1750-1820 as well as grappling with what conceptually constitutes a "social" revolution in the first place.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Gienapp, J. (PI)

HISTORY 365G: African-American Independent Film- On Both Sides of the Camera (AFRICAAM 265G, HISTORY 265G)

From D. W. Griffith's controversial "Birth of A Nation" (1915) to Nate Parker's also controversial "Birth of a Nation" (2016), Black Americans have played roles in Hollywood movies while also seeking to define how they are depicted in these movies. This course will introduce students to this history by featuring works of pioneering black filmmakers who challenged Hollywood racial stereotypes and created alternative images of the African-American experience.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Carson, C. (PI)

HISTORY 368C: Poverty in America (AMSTUD 268C, CSRE 268C, HISTORY 268C)

During the twentieth century, Americans launched numerous bold efforts to reduce poverty in the United States. Federal welfare policy, community-based programs, academic research, philanthropic charity, and grassroots activism committed time and resources to the cause, but poverty-- and inequality-- have persisted. Why? This seminar considers the origins, implementation, and consequences of these remedies, noting in particular how race, gender, citizenship, family composition, and geography have shaped the lives of those in poverty and the public and private responses to it.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Dunning, C. (PI)
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints