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401 - 410 of 430 results for: CSI::certificate ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

SOC 271: Organizational Analysis (EDUC 288)

Principles of organizational behavior and analysis; theories of group and individual behavior; organizational culture; and applications to school organization and design. Case studies.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Powell, W. (PI)

SOC 341W: Workshop: Inequality

Causes, consequences, and structure of inequality; how inequality results from and shapes social classes, occupations, professions, and other aspects of the economy. Research presentations by students, faculty, and guest speakers. Discussion of controversies, theories, and recent writings. May be repeated for credit. Restricted to Sociology doctoral students; others by consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

SOC 350W: Workshop: Migration, Ethnicity, Race and Nation

Current theories and research, recent publications, and presentations of ongoing research by faculty and students. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Sociology doctoral student or consent of instructor
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

SOMGEN 207: Theories of Change in Global Health

Open to graduate students studying in any discipline whose research work or interest engages global health. Upper-class undergraduates who have completed at least one of the prerequisite courses and who are willing to commit the preparatory time for a graduate level seminar class are welcome. The course undertakes a critical assessment of how different academic disciplines frame global health problems and recommend pathways toward improvements. Focuses on evaluating examples of both success and failure of different theories of change in specific global health implementations. Prerequisites: ECON 118, CEE 265D, HUMBIO 129S or HUMBIO 124C.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: Luby, S. (PI)

SOMGEN 215: Biosocial Medicine: The Social, Psychological, and Biological Determinants of Behavior and Wellbeing (EDUC 205, HUMBIO 65)

Explores how social forces, psychological influences, and biological systems combine to affect human behavior in early childhood, in the educational experience, and throughout the life course. Examines how behaviors are linked to well-being. Uses a flipped classroom model, in which a series of lectures are available for students to view on-line before class. In-class time then focuses on case studies from published research. Undergraduates enroll for 3 units. Students enrolling for 3 units attend two meetings per week; students enrolling for 2 units attend one meeting per week.This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: Barr, D. (PI)

SOMGEN 275: Leading Value Improvement in Health Care Delivery

Successful leaders on the journey to better care delivery methods with lower total spending inevitably face pivotal crises. What confluence of attitude, strategy, and events allows them to prevail? Contexts will include entrepreneurship and early stage investing, spread of higher value care delivery innovations, health care delivery system management, and private and public policy making to reward value. Guest faculty will include nationally recognized leaders and change agents, who will invite students to recommend alternative approaches to managing pivotal challenges. The course is open to any member of the Stanford community aspiring to lead higher value in health care delivery including graduate students, undergraduates, and postdoctoral candidates, as well as medical center residents and clinical fellows. May be repeated for credit
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

STEMREM 250: Regenerative Medicine Seminar Series

For graduate, medical and undergraduate students. A forum for Stanford researchers to meet, hear about what is going on in Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine at Stanford, and spark collaborations. Topics include all areas of regenerative medicine, broadly defined, ranging from fundamental biological principles and basic science advances to novel applications in biotechnology, stem cell biology, and human disease.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: Palmer, T. (PI)

STRAMGT 306: Food, Health & Nutrition Entrepreneurship

Americans spend nearly 7% of their income on food items and another 5% on food services annually (US Census). Food spend is at the intersection of two of the most important industries in the US: health care and agriculture. Food production today supports the food consumption causing our extraordinary burden of disease; 75 cents of every dollar of the $4.8 billion spent annually on health care is for diet-related disease. The health care system accounts for over 17% of U.S. gross domestic product (GDP). Agriculture and agriculture-related industries contributed 4.8% to the U.S. gross domestic product (GDP) in 2012. This course focuses on the shifting landscapes across these industries and subsequent market opportunities in food, health, and nutrition. The course is designed for students with a broad interest in the food or health systems and/or who are interested in careers in related fields. We will examine the food system from three points of view: the consumer, nutritional science, and policy. The class will focus on solving for consumer needs from the perspective of a health-promoting entrepreneur. The class will involve lecture, discussion, and prominent guest speakers who are entrepreneurs themselves or industry leaders.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: Duswalt, M. (PI)

STRAMGT 308: Entrepreneurship from Diverse Perspectives

This seminar showcases the diversity of entrepreneurs and the range of entrepreneurial paths they pursue. Thirty-fivet entrepreneurs and venture capitalists, primarily woman and under-represented minorities, will share their personal and professional journeys, and how each embodies the entrepreneurial mindset. Case studies, readings and videos, will complement in-class discussions with the speakers in exploring the entire entrepreneurial process from finding an idea and forming and building a team, to being an inclusive leader, raising money, assembling a board, and overcoming setbacks and challenges. The class teaches the entrepreneurial mindset, and how everyone can be entrepreneurial in their lives. Teams will work on creating an idea for a company during the quarter.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

STRAMGT 325: Starting and Growing a Social Venture

This course is for students who may want to undertake an entrepreneurial career by starting and/or managing a social venture. It covers traditional topics in starting and growing a venture - venture creation, resource acquisition, managing growth and harvest/exit - in the context of social enterprises. It is our view that, in most ways, social ventures should be treated and managed like for-profit ventures, and this course reflects this perspective. That said, there are some important differences which are critical to understand to effectively start and manage a social enterprise. We will highlight these throughout our sessions, so while many of the lessons learned are generalizable to all ventures, we don't advise you to take this class unless you really want to learn about social ventures. All the cases and class discussions will be exclusively about enterprises and organizations in the social venture space.nnThe class deals primarily with situations from the point of view of the ent more »
This course is for students who may want to undertake an entrepreneurial career by starting and/or managing a social venture. It covers traditional topics in starting and growing a venture - venture creation, resource acquisition, managing growth and harvest/exit - in the context of social enterprises. It is our view that, in most ways, social ventures should be treated and managed like for-profit ventures, and this course reflects this perspective. That said, there are some important differences which are critical to understand to effectively start and manage a social enterprise. We will highlight these throughout our sessions, so while many of the lessons learned are generalizable to all ventures, we don't advise you to take this class unless you really want to learn about social ventures. All the cases and class discussions will be exclusively about enterprises and organizations in the social venture space.nnThe class deals primarily with situations from the point of view of the entrepreneur/manager, and in a couple of cases, from the perspective of the investor. Students will have a chance to assess opportunity and action in the context of actual social ventures, often in situations that are current. The course is integrative and will allow students to apply many facets of their business school education. We will have a mixture of case discussions, student-led in-class exercises, panel discussions, and guest speakers.
Units: 4 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
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