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1 - 10 of 12 results for: PHYSICS

PHYSICS 15: Stars and Planets in a Habitable Universe

Is the Earth unique in our galaxy? Students learn how stars and our galaxy have evolved and how this produces planets and the conditions suitable for life. Discussion of the motion of the night sky and how telescopes collect and analyze light. The life-cycle of stars from birth to death, and the end products of that life cycle -- from dense stellar corpses to supernova explosions. Course covers recent discoveries of extrasolar planets -- those orbiting stars beyond our sun -- and the ultimate quest for other Earths. Intended to be accessible to non-science majors, material is explored quantitatively with problem sets using basic algebra and numerical estimates. Sky observing exercise and observatory field trips supplement the classroom work.
Terms: Aut, Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHYSICS 16: The Origin and Development of the Cosmos

How did the present Universe come to be? The last few decades have seen remarkable progress in understanding this age-old question. Course will cover the history of the Universe from its earliest moments to the present day, and the physical laws that govern its evolution. The early Universe including inflation and the creation of matter and the elements. Recent discoveries in our understanding of the makeup of the cosmos, including dark matter and dark energy. Evolution of galaxies, clusters, and quasars, and the Universe as a whole. Implications of dark matter and dark energy for the future evolution of the cosmos. Intended to be accessible to non-science majors, material is explored quantitatively with problem sets using basic algebra and numerical estimates.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHYSICS 21S: Mechanics, Fluids, and Heat with Laboratory

How are the motions of objects and the behavior of fluids and gases determined by the laws of physics? Students learn to describe the motion of objects (kinematics) and understand why objects move as they do (dynamics). Emphasis on how Newton's three laws of motion are applied to solids, liquids, and gases to describe phenomena as diverse as spinning gymnasts, blood flow, and sound waves. Understanding many-particle systems requires connecting macroscopic properties (e.g., temperature and pressure) to microscopic dynamics (collisions of particles). Laws of thermodynamics provide understanding of real-world phenomena such as energy conversion and performance limits of heat engines. Everyday examples are analyzed using tools of algebra and trigonometry. Problem-solving skills are developed, including verifying that derived results satisfy criteria for correctness, such as dimensional consistency and expected behavior in limiting cases. Physical understanding fostered by peer interaction and demonstrations in lecture, and interactive group problem solving in discussion sections. Labs are an integrated part of the summer course. Prerequisite: high school algebra and trigonometry; calculus not required.
Terms: Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Betre, K. (PI)

PHYSICS 23S: Electricity, Magnetism, and Optics with Laboratory

How are electric and magnetic fields generated by static and moving charges, and what are their applications? How is light related to electromagnetic waves? Students learn to represent and analyze electric and magnetic fields to understand electric circuits, motors, and generators. The wave nature of light is used to explain interference, diffraction, and polarization phenomena. Geometric optics is employed to understand how lenses and mirrors form images. These descriptions are combined to understand the workings and limitations of optical systems such as the eye, corrective vision, cameras, telescopes, and microscopes. Discussions based on the language of algebra and trigonometry. Physical understanding fostered by peer interaction and demonstrations in lecture, and interactive group problem solving in discussion sections. Labs are an integrated part of the summer courses. Prerequisite: PHYSICS 21 or PHYSICS 21S.
Terms: Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Wiser, T. (PI)

PHYSICS 50: Observational Astronomy Laboratory

Introduction to observational astronomy emphasizing the use of optical telescopes. Observations of stars, nebulae, and galaxies in laboratory sessions with telescopes at the Stanford Student Observatory. Meets at the observatory one evening per week from dusk until well after dark, in addition to day-time lectures each week. No previous physics required. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Aut, Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PHYSICS 190: Independent Research and Study

Undergraduate research in experimental or theoretical physics under the supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisites: superior work as an undergraduate Physics major and consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-9 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHYSICS 205: Senior Thesis Research

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-12 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHYSICS 291: Practical Training

Opportunity for practical training in industrial labs. Arranged by student with the research adviser's approval. A brief summary of activities is required, approved by the research adviser.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

PHYSICS 293: Literature of Physics

Study of the literature of any special topic. Preparation, presentation of reports. If taken under the supervision of a faculty member outside the department, approval of the Physics chair required. Prerequisites: 25 units of college physics, consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHYSICS 490: Research

Open only to Physics graduate students, with consent of instructor. Work is in experimental or theoretical problems in research, as distinguished from independent study of a non-research character in 190 and 293.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Abel, T. (PI) ; Akerib, D. (PI) ; Allen, S. (PI) ; Altman, R. (PI) ; Baer, T. (PI) ; Batzoglou, S. (PI) ; Beasley, M. (PI) ; Bejerano, G. (PI) ; Bhattacharya, J. (PI) ; Blandford, R. (PI) ; Block, S. (PI) ; Bloom, E. (PI) ; Boahen, K. (PI) ; Boneh, D. (PI) ; Boxer, S. (PI) ; Breidenbach, M. (PI) ; Brodsky, S. (PI) ; Bucksbaum, P. (PI) ; Burchat, P. (PI) ; Burke, D. (PI) ; Bustamante, C. (PI) ; Byer, R. (PI) ; Cabrera, B. (PI) ; Chao, A. (PI) ; Chatterjee, S. (PI) ; Chichilnisky, E. (PI) ; Chu, S. (PI) ; Church, S. (PI) ; Dai, H. (PI) ; Das, R. (PI) ; Devereaux, T. (PI) ; Dimopoulos, S. (PI) ; Dixon, L. (PI) ; Doniach, S. (PI) ; Drell, P. (PI) ; Dror, R. (PI) ; Dunne, M. (PI) ; Ermon, S. (PI) ; Fan, S. (PI) ; Fejer, M. (PI) ; Fetter, A. (PI) ; Fisher, G. (PI) ; Fisher, I. (PI) ; Fox, J. (PI) ; Funk, S. (PI) ; Gaffney, K. (PI) ; Ganguli, S. (PI) ; Glenzer, S. (PI) ; Glover, G. (PI) ; Goldhaber-Gordon, D. (PI) ; Gorinevsky, D. (PI) ; Graham, P. (PI) ; Gratta, G. (PI) ; Graves, E. (PI) ; Harbury, P. (PI) ; Harris, J. (PI) ; Hartnoll, S. (PI) ; Hastings, J. (PI) ; Hayden, P. (PI) ; Hewett, J. (PI) ; Himel, T. (PI) ; Hogan, J. (PI) ; Hollberg, L. (PI) ; Holmes, S. (PI) ; Huang, Z. (PI) ; Huberman, B. (PI) ; Hwang, H. (PI) ; Inan, U. (PI) ; Irwin, K. (PI) ; Jaros, J. (PI) ; Jones, B. (PI) ; Kachru, S. (PI) ; Kahn, S. (PI) ; Kallosh, R. (PI) ; Kamae, T. (PI) ; Kapitulnik, A. (PI) ; Kasevich, M. (PI) ; Kivelson, S. (PI) ; Kosovichev, A. (PI) ; Kundaje, A. (PI) ; Kuo, C. (PI) ; Laughlin, R. (PI) ; Leith, D. (PI) ; Lev, B. (PI) ; Levitt, M. (PI) ; Linde, A. (PI) ; Lipa, J. (PI) ; Luth, V. (PI) ; Mabuchi, H. (PI) ; Macintosh, B. (PI) ; Madejski, G. (PI) ; Manoharan, H. (PI) ; Mao, W. (PI) ; Markland, T. (PI) ; Melosh, N. (PI) ; Michelson, P. (PI) ; Moerner, W. (PI) ; Moler, K. (PI) ; Nishi, Y. (PI) ; Osheroff, D. (PI) ; Palanker, D. (PI) ; Pande, V. (PI) ; Papanicolaou, G. (PI) ; Partridge, R. (PI) ; Pelc, N. (PI) ; Perl, M. (PI) ; Peskin, M. (PI) ; Petrosian, V. (PI) ; Pianetta, P. (PI) ; Poon, A. (PI) ; Prinz, F. (PI) ; Qi, X. (PI) ; Quake, S. (PI) ; Raghu, S. (PI) ; Raubenheimer, T. (PI) ; Romani, R. (PI) ; Roodman, A. (PI) ; Rowson, P. (PI) ; Ruth, R. (PI) ; Scherrer, P. (PI) ; Schindler, R. (PI) ; Schleier-Smith, M. (PI) ; Schnitzer, M. (PI) ; Schuster, P. (PI) ; Schwartzman, A. (PI) ; Senatore, L. (PI) ; Shen, Z. (PI) ; Shenker, S. (PI) ; Shutt, T. (PI) ; Sidford, A. (PI) ; Silverstein, E. (PI) ; Smith, T. (PI) ; Spakowitz, A. (PI) ; Spudich, J. (PI) ; Stohr, J. (PI) ; Su, D. (PI) ; Susskind, L. (PI) ; Suzuki, Y. (PI) ; Thomas, S. (PI) ; Tompkins, L. (PI) ; Vuckovic, J. (PI) ; Vuletic, V. (PI) ; Wacker, J. (PI) ; Wagoner, R. (PI) ; Wechsler, R. (PI) ; Wein, L. (PI) ; Weis, W. (PI) ; Wieman, C. (PI) ; Wojcicki, S. (PI) ; Wong, H. (PI) ; Yamamoto, Y. (PI) ; Yamins, D. (PI) ; Zhang, S. (PI)
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