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1 - 10 of 29 results for: CSRE

CSRE 8: Conjure and Manifest: Building a Sustainable Artistic Practice (AFRICAAM 8)

In this course, student-artists spend time investigating their artistic practice as a framework for promoting power, wellness, and creativity; and as a tangible means for navigating the first steps of their artistic careers. We spend time critically examining the philosophies and works of Black artists including James Baldwin, Octavia Butler, RZA (Wu-Tang Clan) and Nayyirah Waheed, in order to explore new visions for the artist as activist, as futurist and as spiritual healer. We then use a mixture of these ideas and our own¿along with meditation and mindfulness experiences¿to begin conjuring and manifesting intimate relationships with our art practice and ourselves. Student-artists will develop creative confidence, formulate game plans for success, and begin to find balance between the uncertainty and ultimate freedom that life as an artist can bring.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Holt, A. (PI)

CSRE 15N: Imagining India: Art, Culture, Politics in Modern India (COMPLIT 14N, FEMGEN 14N, TAPS 14N)

This course explores history via cultural responses in modern India. We will examine a range of fiction, film and drama to consider the ways in which India emerges through its cultural productions. The course will consider key historical events such as the partition of the subcontinent, independence from British rule, Green Revolution, Emergency, liberalization of the Indian economy, among others. We will reflect on epochal historical moments by means of artisticnresponses to these events. For example, Ritwik Ghatak's experimental cinema intervenes into debates around the Bengal partition; Rohinton Mistry's novel, A Fine Balance grapples with the suspension of civil liberties during the emergency between 1975-77; Rahul Varma's play Bhopal reflects on the Bhopal gas tragedy, considered the world's worst industrial disaster. Students willnread, view and reflect on the aesthetic and historical texts through their thoughtful engagement in class discussions and written e ssays. They will also have opportunities to imaginatively respond to these texts via short creative projects, which could range from poems, monologues, solo pieces, web installations, etc. Readings will also include Mahashweta Devi, Amitav Ghosh, Girish Karnad, Jhumpa Lahiri, Manjula Padmanabhan, Salman Rushdie, Aparna Sen, among others.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Menon, J. (PI)

CSRE 45Q: Understanding Race and Ethnicity in American Society (SOC 45Q)

Preference to sophomores. Historical overview of race in America, race and violence, race and socioeconomic well-being, and the future of race relations in America. Enrollment limited to 16.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Snipp, C. (PI)

CSRE 55M: MMUF Seminar

This seminar is designed to help MMUF honor students in the following ways: (1) developing and refining research paper topics, (2) learning about the various approaches to research and writing, and (3) connecting to Stanford University resources such as the library and faculty.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CSRE 100: Grassroots Community Organizing: Building Power for Collective Liberation (AFRICAAM 100, FEMGEN 100X, URBANST 108)

This course explores the theory, practice and history of grassroots community organizing as a method for developing community power to promoting social justice. We will develop skills for 1-on-1 relational meetings, media messaging, fundraising strategies, power structure analysis, and strategies organizing across racial/ethnic difference. And we will contextualize these through the theories and practices developed in the racial, gender, queer, environmental, immigrant, housing and economic justice movements to better understand how organizing has been used to engage communities in the process of social change. Through this class, students will gain the hard skills and analytical tools needed to successfully organize campaigns and movements that work to address complex systems of power, privilege, and oppression. As a Community-Engaged Learning course, students will work directly with community organizations on campaigns to address community needs, deepen their knowledge of theory and history through hands-on practice, and develop a critical analysis of inequality at the structural and interpersonal levels. Placements with community organizations are limited. Enrollment will be determined on the first day through a simple application process. Students will have the option to continue the course for a second quarter in the Winter, where they will execute a campaign either on campus or in collaboration with their community partner.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Murray, D. (PI)

CSRE 103F: Intergroup Communication Facilitation (PSYCH 103F)

This is a TA training course for Psych 103 - Intergroup Communication
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Markus, H. (PI)

CSRE 108: Introduction to Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies (AMSTUD 107, FEMGEN 101, TAPS 108)

Introduction to interdisciplinary approaches to gender, sexuality, queer, trans and feminist studies. Topics include the emergence of sexuality studies in the academy, social justice and new subjects, science and technology, art and activism, history, film and memory, the documentation and performance of difference, and relevant socio-economic and political formations such as work and the family. Students learn to think critically about race, gender, and sexuality from local and global perspectives.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CSRE 117S: History of California Indians (HISTORY 250A, NATIVEAM 117S)

Demographic, political, and economic history of California Indians, 1700s-1950s. Processes and events leading to the destruction of California tribes, and their effects on the groups who survived. Geographic and cultural diversity. Spanish, Mexican, and Anglo-American periods. The mission system.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Anderson, J. (PI)

CSRE 121: Discourse of the Colonized: Native American and Indigenous Voices (NATIVEAM 121)

Using the assigned texts covering the protest movements in the 20th century to the texts written from the perspective of the colonized at the end of the 20th century, students will engage in discussions on decolonization. Students will be encouraged to critically explore issues of interest through two short papers and a 15-20 minute presentation on the topic of interest relating to decolonization for Native Americans in one longer paper. Approaching research from an Indigenous perspective will be encouraged throughout.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-AmerCul | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CSRE 130: Community-based Research As Tool for Social Change:Discourses of Equity in Communities & Classrooms (AFRICAAM 130, EDUC 123, EDUC 322)

Issues and strategies for studying oral and written discourse as a means for understanding classrooms, students, and teachers, and teaching and learning in educational contexts. The forms and functions of oral and written language in the classroom, emphasizing teacher-student and peer interaction, and student-produced texts. Individual projects utilize discourse analytic techniques.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Ball, A. (PI)
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