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31 - 39 of 39 results for: CARDCOURSES::health ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

MED 182: Early Clinical Experience at the Cardinal Free Clinics (MED 282)

The Cardinal Free Clinics, consisting of Arbor and Pacific Free Clinic, provide culturally appropriate, high quality transitional medical care for undeserved patient populations in the Bay Area. Students volunteer in various clinic roles to offer services including health education, interpretation, referrals, and labs. In clinic students are guided in the practice of medical interviews, history-taking and physical examinations as appropriate, and work with attending physicians to arrive at a diagnosis and management plan. Visit http://cfc.stanford.edu for more information.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 241: Clinical Skills for Patient Care in Free Clinics

Enrollment in this course is by application only for advanced volunteers at the Cardinal Free Clinics. Focus is on preparing students to gain early clinical experience by teaching basic skills such as taking patient histories, working with interpreters, providing motivational interviewing, and presenting cases to medical students or physicians. Students learn through classroom lectures and practice sessions. Upon successful completion of a competency assessment, students are able to serve in a clinic role in the Cardinal Free Clinics. Prerequisite: Advanced standing as a volunteer at the Cardinal Free Clinics.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

NENS 222: Dance, Movement and Medicine: Immersion in Dance for PD (DANCE 100)

Combining actual dancing with medical research, this Cardinal Course investigates the dynamic complementary relationship between two practices, medicine and dance, through the lens of Parkinson's disease (PD), a progressive neurological disease that manifests a range of movement disorders. "Dance for PD" is an innovative approach to dancing --and to teaching dance --for those challenged by PD. Course format consists of: 1. Weekly Lecture/Seminar Presentation: Partial list of instructors include Ms. Frank, Dr. Bronte-Stewart and other Stanford medical experts & research scientists, David Leventhal (Director, "Dance for PD") and Bay Area "Dance for PD" certified master teachers, film-maker Dave Iverson, Damara Ganley, and acclaimed choreographers Joe Goode, Alex Ketley, Judith Smith (AXIS Dance). 2. Weekly Dance Class: Stanford students will fully participate as dancers, and creative partners, in the Stanford Neuroscience Health Center's ongoing "Dance for Parkinson's" community dance cl more »
Combining actual dancing with medical research, this Cardinal Course investigates the dynamic complementary relationship between two practices, medicine and dance, through the lens of Parkinson's disease (PD), a progressive neurological disease that manifests a range of movement disorders. "Dance for PD" is an innovative approach to dancing --and to teaching dance --for those challenged by PD. Course format consists of: 1. Weekly Lecture/Seminar Presentation: Partial list of instructors include Ms. Frank, Dr. Bronte-Stewart and other Stanford medical experts & research scientists, David Leventhal (Director, "Dance for PD") and Bay Area "Dance for PD" certified master teachers, film-maker Dave Iverson, Damara Ganley, and acclaimed choreographers Joe Goode, Alex Ketley, Judith Smith (AXIS Dance). 2. Weekly Dance Class: Stanford students will fully participate as dancers, and creative partners, in the Stanford Neuroscience Health Center's ongoing "Dance for Parkinson's" community dance class for people with PD. This Community Engaged Learning component provides opportunity to engage meaningfully with people in the PD community. Dancing together weekly, students will experience firsthand the embodied signature values of "Dance for PD" classes: full inclusion, embodied presence, aesthetic and expressive opportunity for creative engagement, and community-building in action. A weekly debriefing session within Friday's class time will allow students to integrate seminar material with their movement experiences.nnNO PRE-REQUISITES: No prior dance experience required. Beginners are welcome.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

OSPCPTWN 24A: Targeted Research Project in Community Health and Development

Two-quarter sequence for students engaging in Cape Town-sponsored community based research. Introduction to approaches, methods and critical issues of partnership-based, community-engaged research and to the community-based research partners. Qualitative data gathering and analysis methods in community-based research; effective collaboration with community partners and data sources; race and privilege in community-based research. Preparation of research proposals and plans for research carried out during the second quarter through OSPCPTWN 24B.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Africa, A. (PI)

OSPCPTWN 70: Youth Citizenship and Community Engagement

Critical thinking about core concepts in community engagement such as community, self, and identity. The course aims to cultivate a critical consciousness about the meaning of charity, caring, social justice and the aims of engagement with communities to enhance self awareness, awareness of others who are different, awareness of social issues, and an ethic of care where students can be change agents. The meaning of youth citizenship as it relates to engagement with communities will be explored.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

OSPGEN 259: Community Health in Oaxaca

Continuation of MED 259. Close observation of clinicians at work in community health settings in Oaxaca and service with local community health organizations. Combination of classroom study and discussion with cultural immersion, language training, clinical shadowing, and community service. Topics include: Mexican healthcare system; cultural, socioeconomic and educational factors impacting health of Mexicans and Mexican immigrants to U.S.; Mexican cultural and health beliefs; Mexican migration as a multi-ethnic process. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program and successful completion of MED 259 (Spring quarter 2015)
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Garcia, G. (PI)

PEDS 211: Medical-Legal Issues in Children's Health

(Same as LAW 643) Explores the link between poverty and children's health and how the medical and legal fields can work together to improve health outcomes for low income children. Weekly class meetings covering medical legal issues such as asthma immigration, health insurance; intake interviews with patient families and analysis of their medical legal issues; group project focused on a medical legal policy issue; final paper cowritten by law and medical students. May be taken for 2 units (weekly 2.5 hour seminar meetings only), 3 units (participation in either intake interviews or policy work) or 4 units (full participation in all course components). Prerequisite: instructor consent. Preference to students committed to full participation.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

PEDS 212: Challenges of Human Migration: Health and Health Care of Migrants and Autochthonous Populations (HUMBIO 122M)

(Undergraduate students must enroll in HUMBIO 122M. MD and Graduate students enroll in PEDS 212) An emerging area of inquiry. Topics include: global migration trends, health Issues/aspects of migration, healthcare and the needs of immigrants in the US, and migrants as healthcare providers: a new area of inquiry in the US. Class is structured to include: lectures lead by the instructor and possible guest speakers; seminar, discussion and case study sessions led by students. Upper division course with preference given to upperclassmen.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

SOC 186: Introduction to Disability Studies and Disability Rights (ETHICSOC 104X, FEMGEN 94H, HUMRTS 104)

Disability Studies is a relatively new interdisciplinary academic field that examines disability as a social, cultural and political phenomenon. This is an introductory course to the field of disability studies and it aims to investigate the complex concept of disability through a variety of prisms and disciplines including social psychology, the humanities, legal studies and media studies. This course also focuses on the multiple connections between the study of disability and other identities including class, race, ethnicity, gender and sexual orientation, and also includes a comparative look at how disability is treated across cultures. Some of the topics covered in the class are disability and the family, the history of the disability rights movement, the development of disability identity and its intersectionality, antidiscrimination law, the UN Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities, bioethical dilemmas pertaining to disability and more.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Dorfman, D. (PI)
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