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1 - 7 of 7 results for: MGTSC::related

ENGR 130: Science, Technology, and Contemporary Society

Key social, cultural, and values issues raised by contemporary scientific and technological developments; distinctive features of science and engineering as sociotechnical activities; major influences of scientific and technological developments on 20th-century society, including transformations and problems of work, leisure, human values, the fine arts, and international relations; ethical conflicts in scientific and engineering practice; and the social shaping and management of contemporary science and technology.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGR 131: Ethical Issues in Engineering

Moral rights and responsibilities of engineers in relation to society, employers, colleagues, and clients; cost-benefit-risk analysis, safety, and informed consent; the ethics of whistle blowing; ethical conflicts of engineers as expert witnesses, consultants, and managers; ethical issues in engineering design, manufacturing, and operations; ethical issues arising from engineering work in foreign countries; and ethical implications of the social and environmental contexts of contemporary engineering. Case studies, guest practitioners, and field research. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: McGinn, R. (PI)

ENGR 145: Technology Entrepreneurship

How do you create a successful start-up? What is entrepreneurial leadership in a large firm? What are the differences between an idea and true opportunity? How does an entrepreneur form a team and gather the resources necessary to create a great enterprise? Mentor-guided project focused on developing students' startup ideas, immersion in nuances of innovation and early stage entrepreneurship, case studies, research on the entrepreneurial process, and the opportunity to network with Silicon Valley's top entrepreneurs and venture capitalists. For undergraduates of all majors who seek to understand the formation and growth of high-impact start-ups in areas such as information, energy, medical and consumer technologies. No prerequisites. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Aut, Win, Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGR 140A: Leadership of Technology Ventures

First of three-part sequence for students selected to the Mayfield Fellows Program. Management and leadership within high technology startups, focusing on entrepreneurial skills related to product and market strategy, venture financing and cash flow management, team recruiting and organizational development, and the challenges of managing growth and handling adversity in emerging ventures. Other engineering faculty, founders, and venture capitalists participate as appropriate. Recommended: accounting or finance course (MS&E 140, ECON 90, or ENGR 60).
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Byers, T. (PI)

ENGR 140B: Leadership of Technology Ventures

Open to Mayfield Fellows only; taken during the summer internship at a technology startup. Students exchange experiences and continue the formal learning process. Activities journal. Credit given following quarter.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Byers, T. (PI)

ENGR 140C: Leadership of Technology Ventures

Open to Mayfield Fellows only. Capstone to the 140 sequence. Students, faculty, employers, and venture capitalists share recent internship experiences and analytical frameworks. Students develop living case studies and integrative project reports.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Byers, T. (PI)

ENGR 245: The Lean LaunchPad: Getting Your Lean Startup Off the Ground

Apply the "Lean Startup" principles; "business model canvas," "customer development" and "Agile Engineering" to prototype, test, and iterate your idea while discovering if you have a profitable business model. This is the class adopted by the NSF and NIH as the Innovation Corps. Apply and work in teams. Info sessions held in November and December. Team applications required in December. Proposals can be software, hardware, or service of any kind. Projects are experiential and require incrementally building the product while talking to customers/partners each week. Prerequisite: interest and passion in exploring whether a technology idea can become a real company. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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