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151 - 160 of 445 results for: CSI::certificate ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

EDUC 232: Culture, Learning, and Poverty

This course examines the categories and methods used to analyze and explain educational inequalities in the United States from 1950 to present. Approaches to theories of school failure and methods of intervention are distinguished by their ideas on the play of learning, language, cognition, culture, and social class in human development. Particular attention is given to the Culture of Poverty controversies of the 1960s and their recent emergence.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 236: Beyond Bits and Atoms: Designing Technological Tools (CS 402)

Practicum in designing and building technology-enabled curricula and hands-on learning environments. Students use software toolkits and state-of-the-art fabrication machines to design educational software, educational toolkits, and tangible user interfaces. The course will focus on designing low-cost technologies, particularly for urban school in the US and abroad. We will explore theoretical and design frameworks from the constructionist learning perspective, critical pedagogy, interaction design for children. Interested students should complete the application at https://web.stanford.edu/class/educ211 by January 5, and come to the first class at 9am in CERAS 101.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 239: Educating Young STEM Thinkers (EDUC 139, ME 139, ME 231)

The course introduces students to the design thinking process, the national conversations about the future of STEM careers, and opportunities to work with middle school students and K-12 teachers in STEM-based after-school activities and intercession camps. The course is both theory and practice focused. The purpose is twofold; to provide reflection and mentoring opportunities for students to learn about pathways to STEM careers and to introduce mentoring opportunities with young STEM thinkers.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Goldman, S. (PI)

EDUC 240: Adolescent Development and Learning

How do adolescents develop their identities, manage their inner and outer worlds, and learn? Presuppositions: that fruitful instruction takes into account the developmental characteristics of learners and the task demands of specific curricula; and that teachers can promote learning and motivation by mediating among the characteristics of students, the curriculum, and the wider social context of the classroom. Prerequisite: STEP student or consent of instructor. (STEP)
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EDUC 249: Theory and Issues in the Study of Bilingualism (EDUC 149)

Sociolinguistic perspective. Emphasis is on typologies of bilingualism, the acquisition of bilingual ability, description and measurement, and the nature of societal bilingualism. Prepares students to work with bilingual students and their families and to carry out research in bilingual settings.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 256: Psychological and Educational Resilience Among Children and Youth (HUMBIO 149)

Theoretical, methodological, and empirical issues pertaining to the psychological and educational resilience of children and adolescents. Overview of the resilience framework, including current terminology and conceptual and measurement issues. Adaptive systems that enable some children to achieve successful adaptation despite high levels of adversity exposure. How resilience can be studied across multiple levels of analysis, ranging from cell to society. Individual, family, school, and community risk and protective factors that influence children's development and adaptation. Intervention programs designed to foster resilient adaptation in disadvantaged children's populations.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EDUC 265: History of Higher Education in the U.S. (AMSTUD 165, EDUC 165, HISTORY 158C)

Major periods of evolution, particularly since the mid-19th century. Premise: insights into contemporary higher education can be obtained through its antecedents, particularly regarding issues of governance, mission, access, curriculum, and the changing organization of colleges and universities.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Labaree, D. (PI)

EDUC 266: Educational Neuroscience

An introduction to the growing intersection between education research and emerging research on functional brain development. Students will probe the contributions and limitations of emerging theoretical and empirical contribution of neuroscience approaches to specific academic skills such as reading and mathematics, as well as exposure to general processes crucial for educational success, including motivation, attention, and social cognition. Final projects will explore these themes in the service of interventions designed to improve how these functions.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EDUC 271: Education Policy in the United States

(Same as GSBGEN 347) The course will provide students from different disciplines with an understanding of the broad educational policy context. The course will cover topics including a) school finance systems; b) an overview of policies defining and shaping the sectors and institutional forms of schooling, c) an overview of school governance, d) educational human-resource policy, e) school accountability policies at the federal and state levels; and f) school assignment policies and law, including intra- and inter-district choice policies, desegregation law and policy.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Loeb, S. (PI)

EDUC 275: Leading U.S. Schools

The landscape of schooling in the U.S. is dynamic and replete with ideologies, myths, and beliefs. Organizational theory, leadership theory, and empirical research are lenses through which students will develop a deeper and broader understanding of the similarities and differences among private schools, parochial schools, traditional K ¿ 12 schools, charter schools, and alternative schools. Students will connect theory and research to practice by visiting and learning about two or more schools of their choosing.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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