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21 - 30 of 50 results for: PSYCH ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

PSYCH 193: Special Laboratory Research

May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: 1, 10, and consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-6 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Dweck, C. (PI)

PSYCH 194: Reading and Special Work

Independent study. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

PSYCH 195: Special Laboratory Projects

Independent study. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: 1, 10, and consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-6 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

PSYCH 197: Advanced Research

Limited to students in senior honors program. Weekly research seminar, independent research project under the supervision of an appropriate faculty member. A detailed proposal is submitted at the end of Autumn Quarter. Research continues during Winter and Spring quarters as 198. A report demonstrating sufficient progress is required at the end of Winter Quarter.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-4 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

PSYCH 202: Cognitive Neuroscience

Graduate core course. The anatomy and physiology of the brain. Methods: electrical stimulation of the brain, neuroimaging, neuropsychology, psychophysics, single-cell neurophysiology, theory and computation. Neuronal pathways and mechanisms of attention, consciousness, emotion, language, memory, motor control, and vision. Prerequisite: For psychology graduate students, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Poldrack, R. (PI)

PSYCH 204: Computation and cognition: the probabilistic approach (CS 428)

This course will introduce the probabilistic approach to cognitive science, in which learning and reasoning are understood as inference in complex probabilistic models. Examples will be drawn from areas including concept learning, causal reasoning, social cognition, and language understanding. Formal modeling ideas and techniques will be discussed in concert with relevant empirical phenomena.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 207: Professional Seminar for First-Year Ph.D. Graduate Students

Required of and limited to first-year Ph.D. students in Psychology. Major issues in contemporary psychology with historical backgrounds.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

PSYCH 215: Mind, Culture, and Society

Social psychology from the context of society and culture. The interdependence of psychological and sociocultural processes: how sociocultural factors shape psychological processes, and how psychological systems shape sociocultural systems. Theoretical developments to understand social issues, problems, and polity. Works of Baldwin, Mead, Asch, Lewin, Burner, and contemporary theory and empirical work on the interdependence of psychology and social context as constituted by gender, ethnicity, race, religion, and region of the country and the world. Prerequisite: 207 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 217: Topics and Methods Related to Culture and Emotion

Preference to graduate students. How cultural factors shape emotion and other feeling states. Empirical and ethnographic literature, theories, and research on culture and emotion. Applications to clinical, educational, and occupational settings. Research in psychology, anthropology, and sociology. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Tsai, J. (PI)

PSYCH 221: Image Systems Engineering

This course is an introduction to digital imaging technologies. We focus on the principles of key elements of digital systems components; we show how to use simulation to predict how these components will work together in a complete image system simulation. The early lectures introduce the software environment and describe options for the course project. The following topics are covered and software tools are introduced:n- Basic principles of optics (Snell's Law, diffraction, adaptive optics).n- Image sensor and pixel designsn- Color science, metrics, and calibrationn- Human spatial resolutionn- Image processing principlesn- Display technologiesnA special theme of this course is that it explains how imaging technologies accommodate the requirements of the human visual system. The course also explains how image systems simulations can be useful in neuroscience and industrial vision applications.nThe course consists of lectures, software tutorials, and a course project. Tutorials and projects include extensive software simulations of the imaging pipeline. Some background in mathematics (linear algebra) and programming (Matlab) is valuable.nPre-requisite: EE 261 or equivalent. Or permission of instructor required.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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