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1 - 10 of 34 results for: MATSCI

MATSCI 82N: Science of the Impossible

Imagine a world where cancer is cured with light, objects can be made invisible, and teleportation is allowed through space and time. The future once envisioned by science fiction writers is now becoming a reality, thanks to advances in materials science and engineering. This seminar will explore 'impossible' technologies - those that have shaped our past and those that promise to revolutionize the future. Attention will be given to both the science and the societal impact of these technologies. We will begin by investigating breakthroughs from the 20th century that seemed impossible in the early 1900s, such as the invention of integrated circuits and the discovery of chemotherapy. We will then discuss the scientific breakthroughs that enabled modern 'impossible' science, such as photodynamic cancer therapeutics, invisibility, and psychokinesis through advanced mind-machine interfaces. Lastly, we will explore technologies currently perceived as completely impossible and brainstorm the breakthroughs needed to make such science fiction a reality. The course will include introductory lectures and in-depth conversations based on readings. Students will also be given the opportunity to lead class discussions on a relevant 'impossible science' topic of their choosing.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Dionne, J. (PI)

MATSCI 83N: Great Inventions That Matter

This introductory seminar starts by illuminating on the general aspects of creativity, invention, and patenting in engineering and medicine, and how Stanford University is one of the world's foremost engines of innovation. We then take a deep dive into some great technological inventions which are still playing an essential role in our everyday lives, such as fiber amplifier, digital compass, computer memory, HIV detector, personal genome machine, cancer cell sorting, brain imaging, and mind reading. The stories and underlying materials and technologies behind each invention, including a few examples by Stanford faculty and student inventors, are highlighted and discussed. A special lecture focuses on the public policy on intellectual properties (IP) and the resources at Stanford Office of Technology Licensing (OTL). Each student will have an opportunity to present on a great invention from Stanford (or elsewhere), or to write a (mock) patent disclosure of his/her own ideas.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Wang, S. (PI)

MATSCI 85N: Health Fab: Making Stuff for Life

Semiconductor-based chip technology is all around us; in our phones, computers, and cars. However, not all capabilities developed for silicon processing are directed towards computers and mobile devices. A new field has emerged using these fabrication and patterning techniques for medical devices, health monitoring, and human-machine interfaces. We can now create chips that flow not electrons, but liquids, taking samples and performing analyses. These liquid based functions can be integrated together with silicon electronic devices for sensing, control, or manipulation. FitBits and Apple Watches are examples of the first generation of 'wearable' electronics, while more advanced devices that incorporate both liquid based sensors and electronics are on their way.nnIn this class, we will learn some fundamentals of device fabrication for biomedical purposes, take you inside the Stanford NanoFabrication Facility (SNF), and create microfluidic devices. We will cover what is possible with cur more »
Semiconductor-based chip technology is all around us; in our phones, computers, and cars. However, not all capabilities developed for silicon processing are directed towards computers and mobile devices. A new field has emerged using these fabrication and patterning techniques for medical devices, health monitoring, and human-machine interfaces. We can now create chips that flow not electrons, but liquids, taking samples and performing analyses. These liquid based functions can be integrated together with silicon electronic devices for sensing, control, or manipulation. FitBits and Apple Watches are examples of the first generation of 'wearable' electronics, while more advanced devices that incorporate both liquid based sensors and electronics are on their way.nnIn this class, we will learn some fundamentals of device fabrication for biomedical purposes, take you inside the Stanford NanoFabrication Facility (SNF), and create microfluidic devices. We will cover what is possible with current microfabrication techniques, including direct-write lithography, laser cutting, three-dimensional two photon patterning, polymer deposition and metal patterning. Students will learn how to design, fabricate, and test microfluidic and biomedically related devices. In addition to teaching and hands-on training in microfluidic fabrication, the class will include four team-based projects, each with a different device goal. These projects requirements will be submitted by leading research groups at Stanford, providing up-to-date and real world challenges. Each team will work together to identify specific device needs, invent solutions, and built prototype devices. At the end of the course each team will present its designs to the sponsoring research program and describe how they met the required objectives. No prior experience with device fabrication is needed.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

MATSCI 100: Undergraduate Independent Study

Independent study in materials science under supervision of a faculty member.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MATSCI 144: Thermodynamic Evaluation of Green Energy Technologies

Understand the thermodynamics and efficiency limits of modern green technologies such as carbon dioxide capture from air, fuel cells, batteries, and solar-thermal power. Recommended: ENGR 50 or equivalent introductory materials science course. (Formerly 154)
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Chueh, W. (PI)

MATSCI 150: Undergraduate Research

Participation in a research project.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-6 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

MATSCI 159Q: Japanese Companies and Japanese Society (ENGR 159Q)

Preference to sophomores. The structure of a Japanese company from the point of view of Japanese society. Visiting researchers from Japanese companies give presentations on their research enterprise. The Japanese research ethic. The home campus equivalent of a Kyoto SCTI course.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Sinclair, R. (PI)

MATSCI 160: Nanomaterials Laboratory

Preference to sophomores and juniors. Hands-on approach to synthesis and characterization of nanoscale materials. How to make, pattern, and analyze the latest nanotech materials, including nanoparticles, nanowires, and self-assembled monolayers. Techniques such as soft lithography, self-assembly, and surface functionalization. The VLS mechanism of nanowire growth, nanoparticle size control, self-assembly mechanisms, and surface energy considerations. Laboratory projects. Enrollment limited to 24.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Brock, R. (PI)
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