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21 - 30 of 70 results for: VPGE::Leadership ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

EDUC 377G: Problem Solving for Social Change

(Also GSBGEN 367). Stanford graduates will play important roles in solving many of today's and tomorrow's major societal problems -- such as improving educational and health outcomes, conserving energy, and reducing global poverty -- which call for actions by nonprofit, business, and hybrid organizations as well as governments. This course teaches skills and bodies of knowledge relevant to these roles through problems and case studies drawn from nonprofit organizations, for-profit social enterprises, and governments. Topics include designing, implementing, scaling, and evaluating social strategies; systems thinking; decision making under risk; psychological biases that adversely affect people's decisions; methods for influencing individuals' and organizations' behavior, ranging from incentives and penalties to "nudges;" human-centered design; corporate social responsibility; and pay-for-success programs. We will apply these concepts and tools to address an actual social problem facing Stanford University. (With the exception of several classes on strategy and evaluation, there is no substantial overlap with Paul Brest¿s and Mark Wolfson¿s course, Strategic Philanthropy and Impact Investing ( GSBGEN 319), which has a different focus from this one.)
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Brest, P. (PI)

EDUC 377H: Leadership & Diversity: Topics from Education

(Same as GSBGEN 377). This course will explore the critical role diversity plays in successful organizations and challenge students to develop their own brand of leadership, learning from leaders in education who have grappled with these challenges. As impact-oriented leaders aspiring to address challenges across social, economic, and political arenas, we have an imperative to advance diversity, and education provides the perfect canvas on which to explore this imperative. High-stakes issues such as school district reform, teacher effectiveness, and the school-to-prison pipeline present complex dilemmas that demand superb leadership skills. In this course, we will: (1) explore the role that diversity plays in complex leadership challenges; (2) study a range of effective leadership approaches considering different topics in education; and (3) understand our own values and decision-making criteria, developing tactics to improve our leadership capacity. We will examine contemporary leade more »
(Same as GSBGEN 377). This course will explore the critical role diversity plays in successful organizations and challenge students to develop their own brand of leadership, learning from leaders in education who have grappled with these challenges. As impact-oriented leaders aspiring to address challenges across social, economic, and political arenas, we have an imperative to advance diversity, and education provides the perfect canvas on which to explore this imperative. High-stakes issues such as school district reform, teacher effectiveness, and the school-to-prison pipeline present complex dilemmas that demand superb leadership skills. In this course, we will: (1) explore the role that diversity plays in complex leadership challenges; (2) study a range of effective leadership approaches considering different topics in education; and (3) understand our own values and decision-making criteria, developing tactics to improve our leadership capacity. We will examine contemporary leaders and controversies from education, draw upon timeless historical thinkers, enjoy the wisdom of guest speakers, and work intensively in small groups to highlight challenges, opportunities, and tradeoffs. By exploring a range of approaches and situations, we will work to a deeper understanding of ourselves and how to become more capable, empathetic, and effective leaders.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Colby, S. (PI)

EDUC 386: Leadership and Administration in Higher Education

Definitions of leadership and leadership roles within colleges and universities. Leadership models and organizational concepts. Case study analysis of the problems and challenges facing today's higher education administrators.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EE 292I: Insanely Great Products: How do they get built?

Great products emerge from a sometimes conflict-laden process of collaboration between different functions within companies. This Seminar seeks to demystify this process via case-studies of successful products and companies. Engineering management and businesspeople will share their experiences in discussion with students. Previous companies profiled: Apple, Intel, Facebook, and Genentech -- to name a few. Previous guests include: Jon Rubinstein (NeXT, Apple, Palm), Diane Greene (VMware), and Ted Hoff (Intel). Pre-requisites: None
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Obershaw, D. (PI)

EE 402A: Topics in International Technology Management (EASTASN 402A)

Theme for Autumn 2017 is "The Rise of Commercial Space Businesses in Asia." Distinguished guest speakers from industry, governments, and universities present and discuss businesses from Asia related to outer space, including telecommunications, debris removal, payload launch services, space medicine, etc. See syllabus for specific requirements, which may differ from those of other seminars at Stanford.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Dasher, R. (PI)

EE 402T: Entrepreneurship in Asia (EALC 402T, EASTASN 402T)

Distinctive patterns and challenges of entrepreneurship in Asia; update of business and technology issues in the creation and growth of start-up companies in major Asian economies. Distinguished speakers from industry, government, and academia.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EFSLANG 694: English for Business, Industry and Professional Life

For advanced graduate students. Task-based practice of language appropriate for professional settings in industry and related teamwork. Simulation of the roles of manager, applicant, subordinate, and coworker. Prerequisite: EFSLANG 693A, or consent of instructor. Enrollment limited to 14.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Rylance, C. (PI)

ENGR 245: The Lean LaunchPad: Getting Your Lean Startup Off the Ground

Apply the "Lean Startup" principles; "business model canvas," "customer development" and "Agile Engineering" to prototype, test, and iterate your idea while discovering if you have a profitable business model. This is the class adopted by the NSF and NIH as the Innovation Corps. Apply and work in teams. Info sessions held in November and December. Team applications required in December. Proposals can be software, hardware, or service of any kind. Projects are experiential and require incrementally building the product while talking to customers/partners each week. See course website http://stanfordleanlaunchpad.weebly.com/. Prerequisite: interest and passion in exploring whether a technology idea can become a real company. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGR 280: From Play to Innovation

Focus is on enhancing the innovation process with playfulness. The class will be project-based and team-centered. We will investigate the human "state of play" to reach an understanding of its principal attributes and how important it is to creative thinking. We will explore play behavior, its development, and its biological basis. We will then apply those principles through design thinking to promote innovation in the corporate world. Students will work with real-world partners on design projects with widespread application. This course requires an application. You can find the application here: dschool.stanford.edu/classes
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

FINANCE 385: Angel and Venture Capital Financing for Entrepreneurs and Investors

This course covers all the stages of funding for early stage high-growth companies, from seed funding to venture capital rounds to a successful exit. We will concentrate on how entrepreneurs and investors make and should make important decisions. Examples of issues that we will cover are: How can entrepreneurs raise funding successfully? What are typical mistakes entrepreneurs make in raising capital and negotiating with investors? How to choose your investor? How to pitch to an investor? How do angels and VCs generate and process their deal flow and select companies? How are VCs involved in business decisions such as recruiting talent and replacing CEOs? What are the important provisions of financial contracts between VCs and founders? How to value early-stage companies? The course is very applied and mostly case-based. We will discuss a lot of nitty-gritty details that is a must for founders and investors. Case protagonists, founders, angels, and VCs will be among guest speakers. No prior knowledge of the VC industry is needed.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
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