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11 - 17 of 17 results for: ETHICSOC

ETHICSOC 200B: Ethics in Society Honors Thesis

Limited to Ethics in Society honors students, who must enroll once in 200A and once in 200B. Students enrolling in 200B for less than 5 units must get approval from the faculty director.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ETHICSOC 200C: Ethics in Society Honors Thesis

Limited to Ethics in Society honors students, with special approval from the program faculty director.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ETHICSOC 232T: Theories and Practices of Civil Society, Philanthropy, and the Nonprofit Sector (POLISCI 236, POLISCI 236S)

What is the basis of private action for the public good? How are charitable dollars distributed and what role do nonprofit organizations and philanthropic dollars play in a modern democracy? In the ¿Philanthropy Lab¿ component of the course, students will award $100,000 in grants to local nonprofits. Students will explore how nonprofit organizations operate domestically and globally as well as the historical development and modern structure of civil society and philanthropy. Readings in political philosophy, history, political sociology, and public policy. WIM for PoliSci students who enroll in PoliSci 236S.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Sievers, B. (PI)

ETHICSOC 234R: Ethics on the Edge: Business, Non-Profit Organizations, Government, and Individuals (PUBLPOL 134, PUBLPOL 234)

The objective of the course is to explore the increasing ethical challenges in a world in which technology, global risks, and societal developments are accelerating faster than our understanding can keep pace. We will unravel the factors contributing to the seemingly pervasive failure of ethics today among organizations and leaders across all sectors: business, government and non-profit. A framework for ethical decision-making underpins the course. The relationship between ethics and culture, global risks (poverty, cyber-terrorism, climate change, etc.) leadership, law and policy will inform discussion. Prominent guest speakers will attend certain sessions interactively. A broad range of international case studies might include: Zika virus; civilian space travel (Elon Musk's Mars plans); Facebook's news algorithms; free speech on University campuses (and Gawker type cases); designer genetics; artificial intelligence; Brexit; ISIS' interaction with international NGOs; corporate and fina more »
The objective of the course is to explore the increasing ethical challenges in a world in which technology, global risks, and societal developments are accelerating faster than our understanding can keep pace. We will unravel the factors contributing to the seemingly pervasive failure of ethics today among organizations and leaders across all sectors: business, government and non-profit. A framework for ethical decision-making underpins the course. The relationship between ethics and culture, global risks (poverty, cyber-terrorism, climate change, etc.) leadership, law and policy will inform discussion. Prominent guest speakers will attend certain sessions interactively. A broad range of international case studies might include: Zika virus; civilian space travel (Elon Musk's Mars plans); Facebook's news algorithms; free speech on University campuses (and Gawker type cases); designer genetics; artificial intelligence; Brexit; ISIS' interaction with international NGOs; corporate and financial sector scandals (Epi pen pricing, Wells Fargo, Volkswagen emissions testing manipulation); and non-profit sector ethics challenges (e.g. should NGOs engage with ISIS). Final project in lieu of exam on a topic of student's choice. Attendance required. Class participation important (with multiple opportunities to earn participation credit beyond speaking in class). Strong emphasis on rigorous analysis, critical thinking and testing ideas in real-world contexts. There will be a limited numbers of openings above the set enrollment limit of 40 students. Students wishing to take the course who are unable to sign up within the enrollment limit should contact Dr. Susan Liautaud at susanl1@stanford.edu. The course offers credit toward Ethics in Society, Public Policy core requirements (if taken in combination with PUBLPOL 103E or PUBLPOL 103F), and Science, Technology and Society majors and satisfies the undergraduate Ways of Thinking requirement. The course is open to undergraduate and graduate students. Undergraduates will not be at a disadvantage. Everyone will be challenged. Distinguished Career Institute Fellows are welcome and should contact Dr. Susan Liautaud directly at susanl1@stanford.edu. *Public Policy majors taking the course to complete the core requirements must obtain a letter grade. Other students may take the course for a letter grade or C/NC.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ETHICSOC 280: Transitional Justice, Human Rights, and International Criminal Tribunals (HUMRTS 103, INTNLREL 180A, IPS 280)

Historical backdrop of the Nuremberg and Tokyo Tribunals. The creation and operation of the Yugoslav and Rwanda Tribunals (ICTY and ICTR). The development of hybrid tribunals in East Timor, Sierra Leone, and Cambodia, including evaluation of their success in addressing perceived shortcomings of the ICTY and ICTR. Examination of the role of the International Criminal Court and the extent to which it will succeed in supplanting all other ad hoc international justice mechanisms and fulfill its goals. Analysis focuses on the politics of creating such courts, their interaction with the states in which the conflicts took place, the process of establishing prosecutorial priorities, the body of law they have produced, and their effectiveness in addressing the needs of victims in post-conflict societies.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Cohen, D. (PI)

ETHICSOC 432X: Selections in Modern Political Thought (MTL 334, POLISCI 432R)

This graduate-level seminar explores selections from the canon of Western political thought from the late fifteenth through nineteenth centuries. Throughout the course, we will engage in close textual readings of individual thinkers and consider some of the larger questions raised by political modernity. The Fall 2015 offering of the course will focus on the three modern social contract thinkers: Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, and Jean-Jacques Rousseau.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: McQueen, A. (PI)
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