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541 - 550 of 668 results for: all courses

POLISCI 29N: Mixed-Race Politics and Culture (AFRICAAM 52N, ENGLISH 52N)

Today, almost one-third of Americans identify with a racial/ethnic minority group, and more than 9 million Americans identify with multiple races. What are the implications of such diversity for American politics and culture? In this course, we approach issues of race from an interdisciplinary perspective, employing research in the social sciences and humanities to assess how race shapes perceptions of identity as well as political behavior in 21st century U.S. We will examine issues surrounding the role of multiculturalism, immigration, acculturation, racial representation and racial prejudice in American society. Topics we will explore include the political and social formation of "race"; racial representation in the media, arts, and popular culture; the rise and decline of the "one-drop rule" and its effect on political and cultural attachments; the politicization of Census categories and the rise of the Multiracial Movement.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2017 | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

POLISCI 43Q: Immigration Crisis? Policy Dilemmas in the US and Europe

Immigration is a hotly contested social, economic, and political phenomenon in countries throughout the world. People migrate for many reasons, including the desire to start careers, reunite families, and escape oppression. While each story of migration is unique, migration in the modern world has certain commonalities, and these patterns often manifest as political conflict. Labor migration promises economic productivity and efficiency but may threaten existing labor protections and social welfare guarantees to natives. Facilitating migration from failed nation-states may protect the human rights of migrants but introduce security concerns. In the 21st century, the world has witnessed political violence¿by natives and migrants, both first and second generations¿including the September 11th attacks, the London bombings, the mass killings in Norway, and the Paris attacks. How can policymakers harness the promises of immigration without succumbing to its pitfalls? Why do some countries respond so differently than others in similar circumstances? When does the meaning of citizenship evolve and when does it stay the same? What lessons do other countries have for the United States as it considers immigration reform? n n This course is designed to provide students with an overview of immigration law and politics in the United States and other countries, particularly in the European Union. Students will develop the necessary tools to critically analyze immigration policies, starting with the historical evolution of immigration policy in the United States. We will visit Angel Island and discuss the legacy of the Chinese Exclusion Act as well as contemporary immigration politics in San Francisco, a so-called ¿sanctuary city¿ for undocumented immigrants. There will also be a screening on La Haine (Hate), an acclaimed French film which chronicles the challenges of immigrant integration. Students will study the economics of immigration and the politics of refugees in the context of post-9/11 security dilemmas. Students will design a concrete immigration policy proposal.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2017 | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

POLISCI 115E: Japan & the World: Innovation, Economic Growth, Globalization, and Int'l Security Challenges (EASTASN 153, EASTASN 253, ECON 120)

This course introduces students to the economy, politics, and international relations of contemporary Japan. The course puts a particular emphasis on several emerging issues in Japan including innovation and economic dynamism, Japan's contributions to international peace and cooperation, and Japan's response to international economic and geopolitical challenges. The course will invite several guest instructors, each of whom is an expert on at least one of the issues that Japan faces today, to give lectures in addition to the main instructors. The guest lecturers will also be available outside of the classroom for further discussion during their stays at Stanford.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 121L: Racial-Ethnic Politics in US (CSRE 121L, PUBLPOL 121L)

This course examines various issues surrounding the role of race and ethnicity in the American political system. Specifically, this course will evaluate the development of racial group solidarity and the influence of race on public opinion, political behavior, the media, and in the criminal justice system. We will also examine the politics surrounding the Multiracial Movement and the development of racial identity and political attitudes in the 21st century. PoliSci 150A, Stats 60 or Econ 1 is strongly recommended.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2017 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 125M: Latino Social Movements (CHILATST 181)

Social movements are cooperative attempts to change the world. This course reviews historically significant and contemporary political and social movements in Latino communities in the U.S., including the movements of the 1960s and events of the modern era such as the Spring 2006 marches and student walkouts, the 2010 resistance to Arizona¿s SB1070, and ongoing efforts in 2017 related to detention and deportation policies.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2017 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 125S: Chicano/Latino Politics (CHILATST 125S)

The political position of Latinos and Latinas in the U.S.. Focus is on Mexican Americans, with attention to Cuban Americans, Puerto Ricans, and other groups. The history of each group in the American polity; their political circumstances with respect to the electoral process, the policy process, and government; the extent to which the demographic category Latino is meaningful; and group identity and solidarity among Americans of Latin American ancestry. Topics include immigration, education, affirmative action, language policy, and environmental justice.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 125V: The Voting Rights Act (AFRICAAM 125V, CSRE 125V)

Focus is on whether and how racial and ethnic minorities including African Americans, Asian Americans, and Latinos are able to organize and press their demands on the political system. Topics include the political behavior of minority citizens, the strength and effect of these groups at the polls, the theory and practice of group formation among minorities, the responsiveness of elected officials, and the constitutional obstacles and issues that shape these phenomena.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2014 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 133: Ethics and Politics of Public Service (CSRE 178, ETHICSOC 133, HUMBIO 178, PHIL 175A, PHIL 275A, PUBLPOL 103D, URBANST 122)

Ethical and political questions in public service work, including volunteering, service learning, humanitarian assistance, and public service professions such as medicine and teaching. Motives and outcomes in service work. Connections between service work and justice. Is mandatory service an oxymoron? History of public service in the U.S. Issues in crosscultural service work. Integration with the Haas Center for Public Service to connect service activities and public service aspirations with academic experiences at Stanford.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2018 | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 146A: African Politics (AFRICAAM 146A)

Africa has lagged the rest of the developing world in terms of economic development, the establishment of social order, and the consolidation of democracy. This course seeks to identify the historical and political sources accounting for this lag, and to provide extensive case study and statistical material to understand what sustains it, and how it might be overcome.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2015 | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

POLISCI 212C: Civil War and International Politics: Syria in Context (POLISCI 212X)

The Syrian civil war is both a humanitarian disaster and a focal point for a set of interlocking regional and international political struggles. This course uses the Syrian case as an entry for exploring broader questions, such as why do civil wars begin, how do they end, and what are the international politics of civil war. Political Science majors taking this course to fulfill the WIM requirement should enroll in POLISCI 212C.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2015 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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