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LIFE 124: Counterstory and Narrative Inquiry in Literature and Education (CSRE 141E, EDUC 141, EDUC 341)

Counterstory is a method developed in critical legal studies that emerges out of the broad "narrative turn" in the humanities and social science. This course explores the value of this turn, especially for marginalized communities, and the use of counterstory as analysis, critique, and self-expression. Using an interdisciplinary approach, we examine counterstory as it has developed in critical theory, critical pedagogy, and critical race theory literatures, and explore it as a framework for liberation, cultural work, and spiritual exploration.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LIFE 145: Trauma, healing, and empowerment (CSRE 145H)

This course will look at the ways in which humans are affected by the legacy of war, occupation and colonialism through themes of home, displacement, community, roots, identity, and inter-generational trauma. The approach is integrative, including scholarly investigation, embodied practice, and creative approach. This self-reflective process uses narrative, oral and written, as a means of becoming whole and healing personal, historical, and collective wounds.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 64Q: These languages were here first: A look at the indigenous languages of California (ANTHRO 64Q, NATIVEAM 64Q)

Stanford was built on land originally inhabited by the Muwekma Ohlone tribe, and Native American students have always held an important place in the university community from the writer and journalist John Milton Oskison (Cherokee) who graduated in 1894 to current enrolments of over three hundred students who represent over fifty tribes. Two hundred years ago, the Muwekma language was one of a hundred languages that made California one of the most linguistically-diverse places on earth. Today, less than half of these languages survive but many California Indian communities are working hard to maintain and revitalize them. This is a familiar pattern globally: languages around the world are dying at such a rapid rate that the next century could see half of the world's 6800 languages and cultures become extinct unless action is taken now. Focusing especially on California, this course seeks to find out how and why languages die; what is lost from a culture when that occurs; and how `sleep more »
Stanford was built on land originally inhabited by the Muwekma Ohlone tribe, and Native American students have always held an important place in the university community from the writer and journalist John Milton Oskison (Cherokee) who graduated in 1894 to current enrolments of over three hundred students who represent over fifty tribes. Two hundred years ago, the Muwekma language was one of a hundred languages that made California one of the most linguistically-diverse places on earth. Today, less than half of these languages survive but many California Indian communities are working hard to maintain and revitalize them. This is a familiar pattern globally: languages around the world are dying at such a rapid rate that the next century could see half of the world's 6800 languages and cultures become extinct unless action is taken now. Focusing especially on California, this course seeks to find out how and why languages die; what is lost from a culture when that occurs; and how `sleeping¿ languages might be revitalized. We will take a field trip to a Native American community in northern California to witness first-hand how one community is bringing back its traditional language, songs, dances, and story-telling. We will learn from visiting indigenous leaders and linguistic experts who will share their life, language, and culture with the class. Through weekly readings and discussion, we will investigate how languages can be maintained and revitalized by methods of community- and identity-building, language documentation and description, the use of innovative technologies, writing dictionaries and grammars for different audiences, language planning, and data creation, annotation, preservation, and dissemination. Finally, the course will examine ethical modes of fieldwork within endangered-language communities.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

LINGUIST 65: African American Vernacular English (AFRICAAM 21, CSRE 21)

Vocabulary, pronunciation and grammatical features of the systematic and vibrant vernacular English [AAVE] spoken by African Americans in the US, its historical relation to British dialects, and to English creoles spoken on the S. Carolina Sea Islands (Gullah), in the Caribbean, and in W. Africa. The course will also explore the role of AAVE in the Living Arts of African Americans, as exemplified by writers, preachers, comedians and actors, singers, toasters and rappers, and its connections with challenges that AAVE speakers face in the classroom and courtroom. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center). UNITS: 3-5 units. Most students should register for 4 units. Students willing and able to tutor an AAVE speaking child in East Palo Alto and write an additional paper about the experience may register for 5 units, but should consult the instructor first. Students who, for exceptional reasons, need a reduced course load, may request a reduction to 3 units, but more of their course grade will come from exams, and they will be excluded from group participation in the popular AAVE Happenin at the end of the course.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 150: Language and Society

How language and society affect each other. Class, age, ethnic, and gender differences in speech. Prestige and stigma associated with different ways of speaking and the politics of language. The strategic use of language. Stylistic practice; how speakers use language to construct styles and adapt their language to different audiences and social contexts. This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units to be eligible for Ways credit.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Pratt, T. (PI)

LINGUIST 156: Language and Gender (FEMGEN 156X)

The role of language in the construction of gender, the maintenance of the gender order, and social change. Field projects explore hypotheses about the interaction of language and gender. No knowledge of linguistics required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 167: Languages of the World

The diversity of human languages, their sound systems, vocabularies, and grammars. Tracing historical relationships between languages and language families. Parallels with genetic evolutionary theory. Language policy, endangered languages and heritage languages. Classification of sign languages.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2015 | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MED 87Q: Women and Aging

Preference to sophomores. Biology, clinical issues, social and health policies of aging; relationships, lifestyles, and sexuality; wise women and grandmothers. Sources include scientific articles, essays, poetry, art, and film. Service-learning experience with older women. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

MED 157: Foundations for Community Health Engagement

Open to undergraduate, graduate, and MD students. Examination and exploration of community health principles and their application at the local level. Designed to prepare students to make substantive contributions in a variety of community health settings (e.g. clinics, government agencies, non-profit organization, advocacy groups). Topics include community health assessment; health disparities; health promotion and disease prevention; strategies for working with diverse, low-income, and underserved populations; and principles of ethical and effective community engagement.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

MUSIC 7B: Musical Cultures of the World

An overview of selected musical cultures from Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Americas. Course objectives: cultivate an appreciation for the diversity of human musical expression; discover how music is used to shape social interactions and systems of meaning; develop active listening skills that can be used when encountering any music; gain a preliminary understanding of ethnomusicological concepts and vocabulary. No musical experience is necessary. Class format: Lecture, discussion, listening, guest performances, musical participation, and a concert analysis.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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