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401 - 410 of 668 results for: all courses

HISTORY 64: Racial and Ethnic Diversity in Modern America (CSRE 64)

How ethnicity influenced the American experience and how prevailing attitudes about racial and ethnic groups over time have affected the historical and contemporary reality of the nation's major minority populations. Focus is on the past two centuries.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2014 | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 69Q: American Road Trips (AMSTUD 109Q)

"Nothing behind me, everything ahead of me, as is ever so on the road." --Jack Kerouac, On the Road, 1957. From Jack Kerouac's On the Road to Cheryl Strayed's Wild, this course explores epic road trips of the twentieth century. Travel is a fundamental social and cultural practice through which Americans have constructed ideas about the self, the nation, the past, and the future. The open road, as it is often called, offered excitement, great adventure, and the space for family bonding and memory making. But the footloose and fancy-free nature of travel that Jack Kerouac celebrated was available to some travelers but not to all. Engaging historical and literary texts, film, autobiography, memoir, photography, and music, we will consider the ways that travel and road trips have been represented in American culture. This course examines the following questions: How did men and women experience travel differently? How did the motivations for travel change over time? What role did race, ethnicity, class, relationships, and sexuality play in these trips? Students will work together to plan a road trip of their own which the class will take during the quarter.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2017 | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 82G: Making Palestine Visible (CSRE 82G, HISTORY 182G)

Israel-Palestine is one of the most difficult subjects to talk about, in large part because we in the United States do not have much exposure to Palestinian history, culture, and politics in their own terms. This course aims to humanize Palestinians and asks why Palestinian claims to rights are illegible for much of the American public. We begin to answer this question by examining a broad sampling of history, structures of power and law, culture, and contemporary political issues.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2017 | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 83S: Refugees of Palestine and Syria: History, Identity, and Politics of Exile in the Middle East

Mass displacements of Palestinians (1948, 1967) and Syrians (2011-) remain crucial to our understanding of history and politics of the modern Middle East. The course topics include the media's role in alleviating or worsening refugee crises, the Palestinian "right of return," and the place of religion in the Syrian civil war. By looking at autobiographies, graffiti, revolutionary posters, and music, we will study the construction of refugee identities, through the prism of race, ethnicity, statelessness, gender, and sexual orientation. Priority given to history majors and minors.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2016 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 95: Modern Korean History

(Same as HISTORY 195. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 195.) This lecture course provides a general introduction to the history of modern Korea. Themes include the characteristics of the Chosôn dynasty, reforms and rebellions in the nineteenth century, Korean nationalism; Japan's colonial rule and Korean identities; decolonization and the Korean War; and the different state-building processes in North and South, South Korea's democratization in 1980s, and the current North Korean crisis.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Moon, Y. (PI)

HISTORY 113: Before Globalization: Understanding Premodern World History

(Formerly CLASSHIS 147.) This course covers the history of the world from 60,000 years ago until 1500 by asking big questions: Why did civilizations develop the way they did? What factors were responsible for similarities and differences between different parts of the world? What does this mean for our newly globalized world?
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2014 | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 140: World History of Science

(Same as HISTORY 40. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 140.) The earliest developments in science, the prehistoric roots of technology, the scientific revolution, and global voyaging. Theories of human origins and the oldest known tools and symbols. Achievements of the Mayans, Aztecs, and native N. Americans. Science and medicine in ancient Greece, Egypt, China, Africa, and India. Science in medieval and Renaissance Europe and the Islamic world including changing cosmologies and natural histories. Theories of scientific growth and decay; how science engages other factors such as material culture and religions.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Proctor, R. (PI)

HISTORY 144: Women and Gender in Science, Medicine and Engineering (FEMGEN 144)

(Same as HISTORY 44. Majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in HISTORY 144.) Men's and women's roles in science, medicine, and engineering over the past 200 years with a focus on the present. What efforts are underway globally to transform research institutions so that both men's and women's careers can flourish? How have science and medicine studied and defined males and females? How can we harness the creative power of gender analysis to enhance knowledge and spark innovation?
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 147: History of South Africa (AFRICAAM 147, CSRE 174)

(Same as HISTORY 47. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 147.) Introduction, focusing particularly on the modern era. Topics include: precolonial African societies; European colonization; the impact of the mineral revolution; the evolution of African and Afrikaner nationalism; the rise and fall of the apartheid state; the politics of post-apartheid transformation; and the AIDS crisis.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Campbell, J. (PI)

HISTORY 150C: The United States in the Twentieth Century (AMSTUD 150C)

(Same as HISTORY 50C. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 150C.) 100 years ago, women and most African-Americans couldn't vote; automobiles were rare and computers didn't exist; and the U.S. was a minor power in a world dominated by European empires. This course surveys politics, culture, and social movements to answer the question: How did we get from there to here? Two historical research "labs" or archival sessions focus on the Great Depression in the 1930s and radical and conservative students movements of the 1960s. Suitable for non-majors and majors alike.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Burns, J. (PI)
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