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141 - 150 of 717 results for: all courses

ARTHIST 186B: Asian American Art: 1850-Present (AMSTUD 186D, ASNAMST 186B)

In 1968, the Asian American Political Alliance began a successful campaign to jettison the designation "oriental" in favor of "Asian American." Given the term's recent genesis, what do we refer to when we discuss "Asian American art," and how can we speak of its history? This lecture class will explore these questions by considering artists, craftsmen, and laborers of Asian descent in the United States, beginning with Chinese immigration to California in the mid-nineteenth century, and extending through our current moment of globalization. We will consider their work alongside art and visual culture of the United States that engages "Asia" as a place, idea, or fantasy. Special attention will be paid to the crucial role Asia and Asian Americans played in movements including photography in San Francisco, Abstract Expressionism, Beat Culture, performance art, and New Queer Cinema. Artists include Chiura Obata, Isamu Noguchi, Yoko Ono, Nam June Paik, Manuel Ocampo, Zarina, and Wu Tsang, among many others.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Kwon, M. (PI)

ARTHIST 188B: From Shanghai Modern to Global Contemporary: Frontiers of Modern Chinese Art (ARTHIST 388B)

Chinese artistic engagements with international arenas and with the cultural politics of modernity, from the late 19th century to the present. Topics will include Shanghai modernity and public media; artistic reform and political activism at the end of empire; competition between national style painting and international modernisms; politicized arts of resistance and revolution; post-Mao era experimental and avant-garde movements; transnational careers and exhibition circuits.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2017 | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTHIST 189C: Global Currents: Early Modern Art Enterprises, Economies, and Imaginaries (ARTHIST 389C)

Episodes of global artistic exchange from the 16th to 19th centuries involving commodities (porcelains and textiles), technologies (printmaking, perspective, and cartography), and imaginaries (Chinoiserie, East Asian Occidenteries, Orientalism, Japonisme). The role of enterprises, institutions, and power relations in artistic economies, from the Portuguese Empire, Jesuit mission networks and East India Companies to imperialist systems.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2015 | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 190A: Indigenous Cultural Heritage: Protection, Practice, Repatriation (ARTHIST 490A, PUBLPOL 190, PUBLPOL 290)

This interdisciplinary seminar explores pressing questions relating to the protection, practice and repatriation of the cultural heritage of Indigenous peoples from North America and beyond. Using an innovative combination of in-class lectures and videos of interviews with renowned experts, including Indigenous leaders, scholars, artists and performers and museum professionals from around the world, this seminar will explore and problematize, among other subjects: the impact of colonialism, urbanization and other political, legal, economic, religious and cultural forces on understandings and definitions of "indigenous" and "cultural heritage"; the development of international law relating to Indigenous peoples¿ cultural rights; international, domestic, and tribal heritage protection and repatriation laws/initiatives including the 2007 United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP), the 1990 US Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), and more »
This interdisciplinary seminar explores pressing questions relating to the protection, practice and repatriation of the cultural heritage of Indigenous peoples from North America and beyond. Using an innovative combination of in-class lectures and videos of interviews with renowned experts, including Indigenous leaders, scholars, artists and performers and museum professionals from around the world, this seminar will explore and problematize, among other subjects: the impact of colonialism, urbanization and other political, legal, economic, religious and cultural forces on understandings and definitions of "indigenous" and "cultural heritage"; the development of international law relating to Indigenous peoples¿ cultural rights; international, domestic, and tribal heritage protection and repatriation laws/initiatives including the 2007 United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP), the 1990 US Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), and others; past and present Western museum practices and guidelines relating to display, preservation, provenance research and repatriation of indigenous cultural material; the meaning of repatriation to Indigenous peoples and other stakeholders; and resolving repatriation disputes, including by alternative dispute resolution (ADR) processes. While case studies will relate primarily to Indigenous peoples of North America, comparisons will be drawn with the situation of Indigenous peoples in other regions, such as Oceania and Russia. Each week students will brainstorm actionable ideas for amending/supplementing current frameworks in order to give force to the cultural rights enumerated in UNDRIP. The overall seminar experience will involve discussions of lectures and video content, assigned readings, quizzes, a class visit to the Cantor Center Native Americas collection, and visits to our classroom by experts. Elements used in grading: class participation, attendance and a final project (one-day take-home exam; or research paper or film project with instructor's consent).
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2016 | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTHIST 207C: Phenomenology and Aesthetics in Medieval Art (ARTHIST 407C)

This course explores the phenomenal aspects of the medieval image and space such as glitter, shadow, smoke, reverberation and how these presence effects were conceptualized in medieval culture as animation. Focus is on a select group of monuments as well as engagement with medieval objects at the Cantor Art Museum and the facsimiles of medieval manuscripts kept at the Art Library and Special Collections. Among the monuments we will study are the Alhambra in Spain, the Apocalypse MSS, the Cantigas of Alfonso X, the Byzantine Joshua Roll, the Homiles of the Monk Kokkinobaphos, the Ashburnhamensis Pentateuch, and the Rossano Gospels.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2015 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 208B: The Art of Medieval Spain: Muslims, Christians, Jews (ARTHIST 408B)

The seminar explores the hybrid character of the art of Medieval Spain between the sixth and the fifteenth centuries. Rather than strictly chronological, our exploration of the artistic production of Muslims, Jews, and Christians is structured around major topics such as imperial power, pilgrimage, word and image. The readings juxtapose historical studies of specifically Spanish sites and objects with theoretical approaches tied to the broader themes.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2017 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 211: The California Missions: Art History and Reconciliation (CSRE 111, NATIVEAM 211)

Sites of the spirit and devotion, sites of genocide, foreboding actors in Alfred Hitchcock's Vertigo, the subject of fourth-grade school projects, the Spanish Missions of Alta California are complex sites of inquiry, their meanings and associations different for each visitor. This seminar examines the art and architecture of the California Missions built between 1769 and 1823. Constructed with local materials and decorated with reredos, paintings and sculptures from Mexico and Spain, the Missions are at once humble spaces and flagships of a belated global baroque. They were also the laboratories of indigenous artists and artisans. This course seeks to understand how Mission art was meant to function, how and why it was made, what its materials were, while asking what the larger role of art was in a global system of missions. Can the study of this art lead to the reconciliation of populations in North America and within the field of art history? The Missions require a specific reexamination of the relationship between European and colonial forms, not as objects of curiosity or diffusion but as viable and globally informed agents.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Kinew, S. (PI)

ARTHIST 278: Introduction to Curating

Gain hands-on curatorial experience at the Cantor Arts Center by developing an exhibition in the Oceanic gallery about the Global Southn(the Indian Ocean region). Explore and debate strategies for presenting diverse art forms, conduct research, prepare wall texts and labels, and participate in designing the exhibition space in collaboration with fellow students, faculty, and Cantor staff members.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2016 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTSTUDI 150Q: Queer Sculpture

Outlaw sensibilities, self-made kinships, chosen lineages, utopic futurity, exilic commitment, and rage at institutions that police the borders of the normal these are among the attitudes that make up queer in its contemporary usage. David J. GetsynnThis hands on studio based course explores queer as a form of art production. Artists and thinkers use queer to signal defiance to the mainstream and an embrace of difference, uniqueness and self-determination. To be intolerable is to demand that the normal, the natural and the common be challenged. To do this is not to demand inclusion, but rather to refuse to accept any operations of exclusion and erasure that make up the normal and posit compulsory sameness. Queer Sculpture is also about the strategic effort to appropriate and subvert conventional art practices and tactics that may involve everything from shifts in the content of a work and its targeted audience to the methods by which it is produced and its formal properties. The politi more »
Outlaw sensibilities, self-made kinships, chosen lineages, utopic futurity, exilic commitment, and rage at institutions that police the borders of the normal these are among the attitudes that make up queer in its contemporary usage. David J. GetsynnThis hands on studio based course explores queer as a form of art production. Artists and thinkers use queer to signal defiance to the mainstream and an embrace of difference, uniqueness and self-determination. To be intolerable is to demand that the normal, the natural and the common be challenged. To do this is not to demand inclusion, but rather to refuse to accept any operations of exclusion and erasure that make up the normal and posit compulsory sameness. Queer Sculpture is also about the strategic effort to appropriate and subvert conventional art practices and tactics that may involve everything from shifts in the content of a work and its targeted audience to the methods by which it is produced and its formal properties. The political imperatives of a queer or queered position will shape thematic investigations of practices related to utopic futurity, anti-assimilationist practices, failure, abstraction, the archive, camp, drag and alternative families. Classes will require reading, discussing, and making. Students will produce artwork for critiques and participate in discussions of the readings. The course includes guest artists and fieldtrips to local LGBTQ archives.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Berlier, T. (PI)

ASNAMST 55D: The Asian American Movement: A History of Activism (AMSTUD 155D, ASNAMST 155D, HISTORY 55D, HISTORY 155D)

The "Asian American Movement" was born in the late 1960s inspired by other movements for social change and justice in the era. Activism among Asians in America has a longer history and a continuity to today. We will examine past, present, and future and consider issues of racial/ethnic identity, of inequality, and of injustice. And we will explore avenues that sought remedy and progress. Political, social, cultural, gender and sexuality, and international dimensions will be considered.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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