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ANTHRO 101S: Introduction to Cultural and Social Anthropology (ANTHRO 1S)

This course introduces basic anthropological concepts and presents the discipline's distinctive perspective on society and culture. The power of this perspective is illustrated by exploring vividly-written ethnographic cases that show how anthropological approaches illuminate contemporary social and political issues in a range of different cultural sites.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 113B: Religious Practices in Archaeological Cultures (ANTHRO 213B, ARCHLGY 113B)

According to Hawkes (1954), religion or ideology is the most difficult part of social life to access archaeologically. Luckily, not all scholars agree; according to Fogelin (2008) 'religion is not something people think about, but something people do¿. Thus, archaeology, an inherently multidisciplinary subject that studies material culture, is well suited to delve into religion and its underpinnings.nThis course will explore religious practices, as they can be defined and interpreted from archaeological contexts spanning the Paleolithic to historic periods. Definitions of religion differ from author to author but they mostly agree that religion is a fully integrated and thus integral part of human social life. Politics, economics, identity and social class influence religion, and religion influences how these forces play out in society. Thus, the course will also examine the significance of ritual and religion in a variety of social contexts.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2016 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 128: Visual Studies

Drawing on anthropology, art history, cultural studies, and other fields, this course explores how and why one might want to think critically about the politics of visuality, social imagination, the politics of making and consuming images and things, iconophonia and iconophilia, the classification of people and things into ¿artists¿ and ¿art¿, and cultural production more generally.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Malkki, L. (PI)

ANTHRO 146J: Studies in Ethnomusicology: Listening to the Local: Music Ethnography of the Bay Area (CSRE 146J, MUSIC 146J, MUSIC 246J)

An introduction to music ethnography through student research on musical life in the Bay Area. Focus is on the intersections of music, social life, and cultural practice by engaging with people as they perform music and culture in situ. Techniques taught include participant-observation, interviewing and oral history, writing field-notes, recording, transcription, analysis, and ethnographic writing. Pre-/co-requisite (for music majors): MUSIC 22. (WIM at 4 units only.)
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Schultz, A. (PI)

ARCHLGY 1: Introduction to Archaeology (ANTHRO 3)

Aims, methods, and data in the study of human society's development from early hunters through late prehistoric civilizations. Archaeological sites and remains characteristic of the stages of cultural development for selected geographic areas, emphasizing methods of data collection and analysis appropriate to each.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARCHLGY 21Q: Eight Great Archaeological Sites in Europe (CLASSICS 21Q)

(Formerly CLASSART 21Q.) Preference to sophomores. Focus is on excavation, features and finds, arguments over interpretation, and the place of each site in understanding the archaeological history of Europe. Goal is to introduce the latest archaeological and anthropological thought, and raise key questions about ancient society. The archaeological perspective foregrounds interdisciplinary study: geophysics articulated with art history, source criticism with analytic modeling, statistics interpretation. A web site with resources about each site, including plans, photographs, video, and publications, is the basis for exploring.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, Writing 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Shanks, M. (PI)

ARCHLGY 106A: Museums and Collections (ARCHLGY 306A)

Practical, theoretical, and ethical issues which face museums and collections. Practical collections-based work, museum visits, and display research. The roles of the museum in contemporary society. Students develop their own exhibition and engage with the issues surrounding the preservation of material culture.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2013 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARCHLGY 113B: Religious Practices in Archaeological Cultures (ANTHRO 113B, ANTHRO 213B)

According to Hawkes (1954), religion or ideology is the most difficult part of social life to access archaeologically. Luckily, not all scholars agree; according to Fogelin (2008) 'religion is not something people think about, but something people do¿. Thus, archaeology, an inherently multidisciplinary subject that studies material culture, is well suited to delve into religion and its underpinnings.nThis course will explore religious practices, as they can be defined and interpreted from archaeological contexts spanning the Paleolithic to historic periods. Definitions of religion differ from author to author but they mostly agree that religion is a fully integrated and thus integral part of human social life. Politics, economics, identity and social class influence religion, and religion influences how these forces play out in society. Thus, the course will also examine the significance of ritual and religion in a variety of social contexts.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2016 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARCHLGY 118: Engineering the Roman Empire (CLASSICS 168)

(Formerly CLASSART 117.) Enter the mind, the drafting room, and the building site of the Roman architects and engineers whose monumental projects impressed ancient and modern spectators alike. This class explores the interrelated aesthetics and mechanics of construction that led to one of the most extensive building programs undertaken by a pre-modern state. Through case studies ranging from columns, domes and obelisks to road networks, machines and landscape modification, we investigate the materials, methods, and knowledge behind Roman innovation, and the role of designed space in communicating imperial identity.
Terms: given next year, last offered Spring 2017 | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARCHLGY 134: Museum Cultures: Material Representation in the Past and Present (AMSTUD 134, ARCHLGY 234, ARTHIST 284B, CSRE 134, EDUC 214, NATIVEAM 134)

Students will open the "black box" of museums to consider the past and present roles of institutional collections, culminating in a student-curated exhibition. Today, museums assert their relevance as dynamic spaces for debate and learning. Colonialism and restitution, the politics of representation, human/object relationships, and changing frameworks of authority make museum work widely significant and consistently challenging. Through thinking-in-practice, this course reflexively explores "museum cultures": representations of self and other within museums and institutional cultures of the museum world itself.n3 credits (no final project) or 5 credits (final project). May be repeat for credit
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Hodge, C. (PI)
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