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71 - 80 of 159 results for: all courses

HISTORY 48Q: South Africa: Contested Transitions (AFRICAAM 48Q)

Preference to sophomores. The inauguration of Nelson Mandela as president in May 1994 marked the end of an era and a way of life for South Africa. The changes have been dramatic, yet the legacies of racism and inequality persist. Focus: overlapping and sharply contested transitions. Who advocates and opposes change? Why? What are their historical and social roots and strategies? How do people reconstruct their society? Historical and current sources, including films, novels, and the Internet.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI, Writing 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Samoff, J. (PI)

HISTORY 84N: The American Empire in the Middle East

What have been the traditional objectives of U.S. policy in the Middle East since the end of World War II? What forces shape U.S. policy towards the Middle East? Did those interests and the means employed to pursue them change substantially after the demise of the Soviet Union? What has been the impact of U.S. policy on the region itself? The three principal cases to be examined are Afghanistan, Iraq and Israel/Palestine.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Beinin, J. (PI)

HISTORY 92A: The Historical Roots of Modern East Asia (HISTORY 392E)

Focus is on China and Japan before and during their transition to modernity. The populous, urbanized, economically advanced, and culturally sophisticated Ming empire and Muromachi shogunate in the 16th century when Europeans first arrived. How the status quo had turned on its head by the early 20th century when European and American steamships dominated the Pacific, China was in social and political upheaval, and Japan had begun its march to empire.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2008 | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 95: Modern Korean History

(Same as HISTORY 195. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 195.) This lecture course provides a general introduction to the history of modern Korea. Themes include the characteristics of the Chosôn dynasty, reforms and rebellions in the nineteenth century, Korean nationalism; Japan's colonial rule and Korean identities; decolonization and the Korean War; and the different state-building processes in North and South, South Korea's democratization in 1980s, and the current North Korean crisis.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Moon, Y. (PI)

HISTORY 95C: Modern Japanese History: From Samurai to Pokemon

(Same as History 195C. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 195C.) Japan's modern transformation from the late 19th century to the present. Topics include: the Meiji revolution; industrialization and social dislocation; the rise of democracy and empire; total war and US occupation; economic miracle and malaise; Japan as soft power; and politics of memory. Readings and films focus on the lived experience of ordinary men and women across social classes and regions.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Uchida, J. (PI)

HISTORY 101: The Greeks (CLASSICS 83)

250 years ago, for almost the first time in history, a few societies rejected kings who claimed to know what the gods wanted and began moving toward democracy. Only once before had this happened--in ancient Greece. This course asks how the Greeks did this, and what they can teach us today. It uses texts and archaeology to trace the material and military sides of the story as well as cultural developments, and looks at Greek slavery and misogyny as well as their achievements. Weekly participation in a discussion section is required.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 102: History of the International System (INTNLREL 102)

After defining the characteristics of the international system at the beginning of the twentieth century, this course reviews the primary developments in its functioning in the century that followed. Topics include the major wars and peace settlements; the emergence of Nazism and Communism; the development of the Cold War and nuclear weapons; the rise of China, India, and the EU; and the impact of Islamic terrorism. The role of international institutions and international society will also be a focus as will the challenge of environment, health, poverty, and climate issues to the functioning of the system.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Naimark, N. (PI)

HISTORY 104D: International Security in a Changing World (INTLPOL 241, POLISCI 114S)

(Formerly IPS 241) This class examines the most pressing international security problems facing the world today: nuclear crises, nuclear non-proliferation, digital security, terrorism, and climate change. Alternative perspectives--from political science, history, and STS (Science, Technology, and Society) studies--are used to analyze these problems. The class includes an award-winning two-day international negotiation simulation.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 106A: Global Human Geography: Asia and Africa

Global patterns of demography, economic and social development, geopolitics, and cultural differentiation, covering E. Asia, S. Asia, S.E. Asia, Central Asia, N. Africa, and sub-Saharan Africa. Use of maps to depict geographical patterns and processes.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Lewis, M. (PI)

HISTORY 106B: Global Human Geography: Europe and Americas

Patterns of demography, economic and social development, geopolitics, and cultural differentiation. Use of maps to depict geographical patterns and processes.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Lewis, M. (PI)
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