2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

1 - 4 of 4 results for: PWR ; Currently searching summer courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

PWR 1A: Introduction to Writing at Stanford: Rhetorics of Popular Culture

Popular culture studies breaks down barriers between so-called "low" and "high" culture and uses the textual practices of everyday people to understand our social world. As a reaction to the "high culture" mediums of canonical literature and museum-worthy art, popular culture studies takes the perspective that everyday people, their practices, media, communication, and principles afford provocative insights into our social worlds. PWR1A students will study the rhetorical features and functions of popular culture, from young adult literature, to music, film, games, social media, and comics in order to develop our critical reading, writing, and research skills in preparation for academic work in both PWR1 and PWR2 as well as other writing and research intensive courses. Readings, writing, and other activities prompt students to consider the relationship between language, rhetoric and popular culture in an aim to interrogate popular culture broader social values and assumptions. PWR1A classes are small, workshop-style meetings that encourage extensive interaction between students and instructors. PWR1A does not meet the Stanford first-year writing requirement.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Wright, C. (PI)

PWR 1D: Writing Well: An Introduction to College Writing

Offered only to participants in the Summer College for High School Students. Develops critical reading, writing, and research skills applicable to any area of study. Emphases include close reading, analysis of varied texts, development of strong theses, revision strategies, and introduction to research-based argument. Classes are small, encouraging extensive interaction between students and instructors. Discussions of readings, peer work, and individual conferences with instructors. Each section has a thematic emphasis developed by the instructor; students choose sections based on their individual interests. Does not meet the Stanford first-year writing requirement.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PWR 5: Independent Writing

Individual writing project under the guidance of a PWR instructor. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: first two levels of the writing requirement or equivalent transfer credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PWR 6VT: Researching and Writing About Popular Culture

What does popular culture say about the larger culture? In this class, we use questions about pop culture -- such as video games, pop music, sports, TV, and other popular products -- as a basis for writing and researching. How do video games help us to learn about engineering and physics? How do the virtues of leadership and teamwork get exploited by the extraordinary amounts of money made by owners of professional sports teams? Have TV police shows shaped what courtroom juries expect from DNA evidence? We¿ll learn how to look at pop culture through the lens of the cultural critic -- someone who uses concepts about sociology and anthropology, even biology and economics, to analyze human behavior and its implications. We'll be analyzing clips from pop culture samples -- videos, magazines, advertisements, movies -- as well as theories about media and pop culture to research how these everyday artifacts are at the same time both trashy, meaningless moments, and poignant reminders of who w more »
What does popular culture say about the larger culture? In this class, we use questions about pop culture -- such as video games, pop music, sports, TV, and other popular products -- as a basis for writing and researching. How do video games help us to learn about engineering and physics? How do the virtues of leadership and teamwork get exploited by the extraordinary amounts of money made by owners of professional sports teams? Have TV police shows shaped what courtroom juries expect from DNA evidence? We¿ll learn how to look at pop culture through the lens of the cultural critic -- someone who uses concepts about sociology and anthropology, even biology and economics, to analyze human behavior and its implications. We'll be analyzing clips from pop culture samples -- videos, magazines, advertisements, movies -- as well as theories about media and pop culture to research how these everyday artifacts are at the same time both trashy, meaningless moments, and poignant reminders of who we are. We start by writing an analytical essay about popular culture commentary, move into writing about library research regarding a topic of your choice, and close by sharing research in oral presentations. At each step, we work together as a group, doing workshops and peer review to practice collaboration and project-based learning.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Peterson, J. (PI)
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints