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1 - 10 of 12 results for: PHIL ; Currently searching summer courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

PHIL 29S: Philosophy and Emerging Technologies

This course is an investigation into the philosophical questions raised by emerging technologies such as genetic engineering, self-driving cars, Mars colonization, and interactive art. For each unit, we will first familiarize ourselves with a specific emerging technology, and then look at classic philosophical readings in related topics. We will consider both how these philosophical discussions can help us think about the emerging technology and how the emerging technology might challenge our philosophical preconceptions. Through this course students will become sensitive to the various philosophical issues which new technologies raise, and learn how to apply existing philosophical theories and concepts to new topics and problems. No background in philosophy or familiarity with emerging technologies is required.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Costello, W. (PI)

PHIL 39S: The Good Life: An Introduction to Ethics

The basic question of ethics is 'How should I live?' In this course we'll study conceptions of the good human life proposed by philosophers from Ancient Greece to the present day, including Aristotle, Epicurus, the Stoics, J.S. Mill and Simone de Beauvoir. Among the questions we'll be asking are, 'Is moral virtue necessary for personal happiness?' 'Is the good life simply the most pleasant life?' 'What does it mean to live authentically?' 'Can we know how happy we are?' Students will learn how to engage with historical and contemporary ethical texts, and will practice the distinctive analytical skills characteristic of philosophical writing.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Duffy, H. (PI)

PHIL 42S: Justice and Climate Change

Global climate change is among the greatest global political challenges of our time. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change said in 2014 that the warming of Earth's climate system is a certainty and that it is highly likely that human influence is the dominant cause of climate change. Without action to combat climate change, the effects will worsen and could become catastrophic within a century. The effects of climate change are already being felt across the world. Communities in low lying deltas and islands have been relocated or are facing relocation due to rising sea levels. Increased droughts, storm surges, and floods threaten the lives, health and basic needs of people around the world: poor communities are particularly vulnerable. Human-caused climate change raises many questions of justice: First, is it morally wrong to emit greenhouse gases, the major cause of climate change? Is it unfair for wealthy high emitters to continue emitting given the risks of climate change to more »
Global climate change is among the greatest global political challenges of our time. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change said in 2014 that the warming of Earth's climate system is a certainty and that it is highly likely that human influence is the dominant cause of climate change. Without action to combat climate change, the effects will worsen and could become catastrophic within a century. The effects of climate change are already being felt across the world. Communities in low lying deltas and islands have been relocated or are facing relocation due to rising sea levels. Increased droughts, storm surges, and floods threaten the lives, health and basic needs of people around the world: poor communities are particularly vulnerable. Human-caused climate change raises many questions of justice: First, is it morally wrong to emit greenhouse gases, the major cause of climate change? Is it unfair for wealthy high emitters to continue emitting given the risks of climate change to other people? What priority should be given to the wellbeing of future generations given the costs of reducing GHGs to the current generations? Finally, despite a scientific consensus about climate change's human origins, there is deep political disagreement about the facts about climate change and its alleged human-origins, especially in the United States. How should the government go about making decisions in light of these disagreements; what role should scientific expertise play in democratic deliberations? This course considers justice and climate change across these four dimensions: corrective justice, distributive justice, intergenerational justice, and procedural justice. Our discussions, reading, and writings will work back and forth between the issue of climate change and broader questions within political philosophy. The course is designed to help students develop and practice the skills needed to think and read critically, to communicate effectively across differences through speaking and writing, and to construct arguments that can withstand scrutiny. Students of any discipline are welcome and encouraged to attend. No philosophical background required or presupposed.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Francis, B. (PI)

PHIL 46S: Modern Political Philosophy: Origins of the U.S. Constitution

In this course, we consider the political philosophy that culminated in the founding of the U.S. Constitution. We will consider, among other questions:n- What assumptions about human nature were made by thinkers in this tradition?n- What are rights and where do they come from?n- Why do we form government and what is the common good preserved or promoted by government?n- What is required to preserve our political institutions?n- What is the role of law in civil society?n- To what extent does the political success of the U.S. require virtue?nIn this discussion based seminar, we will read Machiavelli, Descartes, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Lincoln, and the American Founders.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Espeland, A. (PI)

PHIL 47S: Introduction to Modern Philosophy: Skepticism and Scientific Rationalism

Focusing on Descartes, Newton, and Leibniz, the course investigates foundational debates in metaphysics and epistemology of modern philosophy. We closely scrutinize Descartes¿ Meditations, which involves radical skepticism of the external world and subsequent proofs that I exist, that God exists, that material bodies exist, and that I am really distinct from my body. Next, we study Newton¿s criticisms of Descartes¿ physical theories of motion and space. We attempt a definition of Newton¿s important concept of `absolute space¿ and observe its role in his proof of universal gravity. Finally, we turn to Leibniz to raise significant philosophical issues with Newtonian spacetime and Cartesian physics. Though our focus is the seventeenth century, we will end with connections to contemporary debates in philosophy of physics.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Parker, A. (PI)

PHIL 196: Tutorial, Senior Year

(Staff)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHIL 197: Individual Work, Undergraduate

May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHIL 240: Individual Work for Graduate Students

May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHIL 241: Dissertation Development Seminar

Required of second-year Philosophy Ph.D. students; restricted to Stanford Philosophy Ph.D. students. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Sum | Units: 1-4 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

PHIL 450: Thesis

(Staff)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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