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1 - 4 of 4 results for: CSRE

CSRE 10AX: Pacific Standard Time LA/LA: A Celebration Beyond Borders

This Arts Intensive (September) course meets in the Los Angeles region as a Arts Intensive, course with an option for a follow up directed reading in Autumn Qtr 2017.

In September students begin in Los Angeles for an immersion into the region wide exhibition: Pacific Standard Time LA/LA with the guidance of two professors at UCLA's Chicano Research Center. The Arts Intensive course will engage with the exhibition through multiple venues and museums participating in Pacific Standard Time. Shows we will see range from visual and installation works, photography, performance and street art. Professors Chon A. Noriega (UCLA Dept. of Theater, Film and Television) and Charlene Villasenor Black (UCLA Dept. of Art History) will give lectures and guide students exploring the of two specific shows they curated: HOME at LACMA and a photo exhibit at the Gene Autry Museum. These are among two of the projects that students will explore as well as other offerings in the collective PST. Upon the more »
This Arts Intensive (September) course meets in the Los Angeles region as a Arts Intensive, course with an option for a follow up directed reading in Autumn Qtr 2017.

In September students begin in Los Angeles for an immersion into the region wide exhibition: Pacific Standard Time LA/LA with the guidance of two professors at UCLA's Chicano Research Center. The Arts Intensive course will engage with the exhibition through multiple venues and museums participating in Pacific Standard Time. Shows we will see range from visual and installation works, photography, performance and street art. Professors Chon A. Noriega (UCLA Dept. of Theater, Film and Television) and Charlene Villasenor Black (UCLA Dept. of Art History) will give lectures and guide students exploring the of two specific shows they curated: HOME at LACMA and a photo exhibit at the Gene Autry Museum. These are among two of the projects that students will explore as well as other offerings in the collective PST. Upon the return to Stanford students have the option to enroll in directed reading and design their own curatorial projects: visual or performance works that explore the overall themes of LA/LA and gain guidance in mounting those projects on campus.

More about PST: Through a series of thematically linked exhibitions, Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA will present a wide variety of important works of art, much of them new to Southern California audiences. While the majority of exhibitions will have an emphasis on modern and contemporary art, there also will be crucial exhibitions about the ancient world and the pre-modern era. With topics such as luxury objects in the pre-Columbian Americas, 20th-century Afro-Brazilian art, alternative spaces in Mexico City, and boundary-crossing practices of Latino artists, exhibitions will range from monographic studies of individual artists to broad surveys that cut across numerous countries.

While the exhibitions will focus on the visual arts, Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA programs will ultimately expand to touch on music, performance, literature, and even cuisine. Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA will be a multifaceted event that will transform Los Angeles and Southern California for five months, and our understanding of modern and contemporary art forever.

Embracing organizations of all sizes and types ¿from the largest museums to smaller museums, from university galleries to performing arts centers¿Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA exhibitions and programs will take place across Southern California, from Santa Barbara to San Diego, from Santa Monica to Palm Springs.

With its historical roots in Latin America and its current demographics, Los Angeles might be described as tomorrow's capital city. In a way that is possible only in Los Angeles, Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA will implicitly raise complex and provocative issues about present-day relations throughout the Americas and the rapidly changing social and cultural fabric of Southern California.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CSRE 10SC: Inequality and Poverty in the United States (SOC 11SC)

Social inequality is a feature of all advanced industrial societies. However, some societies have more inequality than others, and some types of inequality are more prominent in some societies than in others. Inequality in the United States is greater than in many other industrialized nations and has increased dramatically in the past forty years. Economic inequality, for example, is greater today than any time since the 1920s. Growing public awareness of this inequality has sparked a vigorous debate among politicians and public protests in city streets; some that have turned violent. The Occupy Movement was driven largely by resentment against the growing concentration of economic privilege within a small segment of society. Inequality was a prominent theme in the Bernie Sanders presidential campaign. Despite these debates and protests, there is no consensus about whether anything should be done to stem this trend. nThis class will focus on three domains of inequality in the United St more »
Social inequality is a feature of all advanced industrial societies. However, some societies have more inequality than others, and some types of inequality are more prominent in some societies than in others. Inequality in the United States is greater than in many other industrialized nations and has increased dramatically in the past forty years. Economic inequality, for example, is greater today than any time since the 1920s. Growing public awareness of this inequality has sparked a vigorous debate among politicians and public protests in city streets; some that have turned violent. The Occupy Movement was driven largely by resentment against the growing concentration of economic privilege within a small segment of society. Inequality was a prominent theme in the Bernie Sanders presidential campaign. Despite these debates and protests, there is no consensus about whether anything should be done to stem this trend. nThis class will focus on three domains of inequality in the United States: social class, gender, and racial inequality. The assigned reading and discussions will examine theories and research about the origins of social inequality; how inequality and poverty is reproduced over time; the consequences of inequality and poverty; and what might be done to reduce inequality and poverty in American society. Students will be expected to help lead and participate in class discussions, and to complete a weekly assignment based on the readings. nnIn addition to the in-class instruction, students will have an opportunity to engage in public service activities directly related to poverty and inequality. Students will work with the Director of Community Engaged Learning (DCEL) from the Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity who will assist with their participation in activities connected with social service agencies in the area, including agencies that deal with homelessness, food insecurity, and other needs.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Snipp, C. (PI)

CSRE 198: Internship for Public Service (CHILATST 198)

Students should consult with CCSRE Director of Community Engaged Learning (ddmurray@stanford.edu) to develop or gain approval for an internship that addresses race/ethnicity, public service, and social justice. Students will read a selection of short readings relevant to their placement, write bi-weekly reflections, and meet bi-weekly with the Director of Community Engaged Learning. Units are determined by the number of hours per week at the internship (2 hours/week = 1 unit; 5 hours/week = 2 units; 8 hours/week = 3 units; etc.) Group meetings may be required. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CSRE 200W: Directed Reading

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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