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1 - 10 of 12 results for: CEE

CEE 17SC: Water and Power in the Pacific Northwest: The Columbia River (EARTHSYS 16SC, ENERGY 12SC, POLISCI 14SC)

This seminar will explore the nature of and coupling between water and energy resources in the Pacific Northwest, using the Columbia River as our case study. We will explore the hydrologic, meteorologic, and geologic basis of water and energy resources, and the practical, social, environmental, economic, and political issues surrounding their development in the West. The Columbia River and its watershed provide a revealing prototype for examining these issues. A transnational, multi-state river with the largest residual populations of anadromous salmonids in the continental US, it provides a substantial fraction of the electrical energy produced in the Northwest (the Grand Coulee dam powerhouse on the Columbia is the largest-capacity hydropower facility in the US), it is a major bulk commodity transportation link to the interior West via its barge navigation system, it provides the water diversions supporting a large area of irrigated agriculture in Washington and Idaho, and its waters more »
This seminar will explore the nature of and coupling between water and energy resources in the Pacific Northwest, using the Columbia River as our case study. We will explore the hydrologic, meteorologic, and geologic basis of water and energy resources, and the practical, social, environmental, economic, and political issues surrounding their development in the West. The Columbia River and its watershed provide a revealing prototype for examining these issues. A transnational, multi-state river with the largest residual populations of anadromous salmonids in the continental US, it provides a substantial fraction of the electrical energy produced in the Northwest (the Grand Coulee dam powerhouse on the Columbia is the largest-capacity hydropower facility in the US), it is a major bulk commodity transportation link to the interior West via its barge navigation system, it provides the water diversions supporting a large area of irrigated agriculture in Washington and Idaho, and its watershed is home to significant sources of solar and wind energy. We will use the Columbia to study water and energy resources, and especially their coupling, in the context of rapid climate change, ecosystem impacts, economics, and public policy. We will begin with a week of classroom study and discussion on campus, preparing for the field portion of the seminar. We will then travel to the Columbia basin, spending approximately 10 days visiting a number of water and energy facilities across the watershed, e.g., solar, wind, and natural gas power plants; dams and reservoirs with their powerhouses, fish passage facilities, navigation locks, and flood-mitigation systems; an irrigation project; operation centers; and offices of regulatory agencies. We will meet with relevant policy experts and public officials, along with some of the stakeholders in the basin. Over the summer students will be responsible for assigned readings from several sources, including monographs, online materials, and recent news articles. During the trip, students will work in small groups to analyze and assess one aspect of the coupling between water and energy resources in the Northwest. The seminar will culminate in presentations on these analyses. Travel expenses during the seminar will be provided (except incidentals) by the Bill Lane Center for the American West and Sophomore College.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CEE 70: Environmental Science and Technology (ENGR 90)

Introduction to environmental quality and the technical background necessary for understanding environmental issues, controlling environmental degradation, and preserving air and water quality. Material balance concepts for tracking substances in the environmental and engineering systems.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Kopperud, R. (PI)

CEE 73: Water: An Introduction

Lake Tahoe's waters are so clear you can follow a diver 70 feet below your boat. A Lake Erie summer often means that nearshore waters have a green surface scum obscuring everything below. California, suffering from drought, is seriously considering reclamation and direct potable reuse of sewage -- aka toilet to tap. Can we (or should we) do this? Why is Tahoe clear, Erie green? This class introduces students to the fundamental tools and science used to understand and manage both natural and human-engineered water systems. Each student will use these tools to explore a water topic of their choosing.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 101S: Science & Engineering Problem-Solving with MatLab. (CEE 201S)

Introduction to the application of MATLAB to an array of engineering systems. Emphasis on computational and visualization methods in the design, modeling and analysis of engineering problems.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Fong, D. (PI)

CEE 175P: Persuasive Communication for Environmental Scientists, Practitioners, and Entrepreneurs (CEE 275P)

Achieving environmental goals depends not only on innovative ideas and great science but also persuasive communication. What makes communication persuasive? The ability of the communicator to create value for his or her audience. This course will teach students how to: 1) focus on their audience and 2) create value for their audience using research-proven communication techniques. Students will master these techniques through oral and written exercises so that, after taking this course, they will speak and write more persuasively.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Stanton, C. (PI)

CEE 175S: Environmental Entrepreneurship and Innovation (CEE 275S)

Our current infrastructure for provision of critical services-clean water, energy, transportation, environmental protection; requires substantial upgrades. As a complement to the scientific and engineering innovations taking place in the environmental field, this course emphasizes the analysis of economic factors and value propositions that align value chain stakeholder interests.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 177L: Smart Cities & Communities (CEE 277L)

A city is comprised of people and a complex system of systems. Data provides the connective tissue between those systems. Smart cities use information technology (IT) to harness that data for operational efficiency, efficacy of government services, and sustainability. Key enablers covered include: IoT, open data, analytics, cloud and cognitive computing, and systems of engagement. System case studies will include: water, energy, transportation, buildings, food production, urban design, and social services. The evolving relationship between a city and its citizens as well as the risks / challenges of smart cities will also be explored.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Lechner, R. (PI)

CEE 201S: Science & Engineering Problem-Solving with MatLab. (CEE 101S)

Introduction to the application of MATLAB to an array of engineering systems. Emphasis on computational and visualization methods in the design, modeling and analysis of engineering problems.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Fong, D. (PI)

CEE 273F: Urban Water Use Efficiency and Conservation

Introduction to water reuse, including membrane treatment, groundwater infiltration, artificial turf, and runoff collection and use.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Reinhard, M. (PI)

CEE 275P: Persuasive Communication for Environmental Scientists, Practitioners, and Entrepreneurs (CEE 175P)

Achieving environmental goals depends not only on innovative ideas and great science but also persuasive communication. What makes communication persuasive? The ability of the communicator to create value for his or her audience. This course will teach students how to: 1) focus on their audience and 2) create value for their audience using research-proven communication techniques. Students will master these techniques through oral and written exercises so that, after taking this course, they will speak and write more persuasively.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Stanton, C. (PI)
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