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1 - 10 of 15 results for: BIO ; Currently searching summer courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

BIO 7S: Introduction to Biology

Introduction to several major fields of biology, including biochemistry, cell biology, genetics, evolution, and biodiversity. Introduces the general approaches used by scientists to study life and explores recent advances in each area during weekly discussion section. Not intended for biology majors, but provides the foundation for higher-level biology courses. Prerequisite: high school biology.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Schwartz, E. (PI)

BIO 10SC: Natural History, Marine Biology, and Research

Monterey Bay is home to the nation¿s largest marine sanctuary and also home to Stanford's Hopkins Marine Station. This course, based at Hopkins, explores the spectacular biology of Monterey Bay and the artistic and political history of the region. We will conduct investigations across all of these contexts toward an inclusive understanding of ¿place¿, ultimately to lead us to explore our own lives in relation to the natural world, historical and cultural milieu, and the direction of our individual life path.n The location at the entry point to the Big Sur Coast of California provides a unique outdoor laboratory in which to study the biology of the bay and the adjacent coastal lands. It is also an area with a deep cultural, literary and artistic history. We will meet marine biologists, experts in the literary history of Cannery Row and the writings of John Steinbeck, local artists and photographers, experts in the neuroscience of creativity, as well as people who are very much involved more »
Monterey Bay is home to the nation¿s largest marine sanctuary and also home to Stanford's Hopkins Marine Station. This course, based at Hopkins, explores the spectacular biology of Monterey Bay and the artistic and political history of the region. We will conduct investigations across all of these contexts toward an inclusive understanding of ¿place¿, ultimately to lead us to explore our own lives in relation to the natural world, historical and cultural milieu, and the direction of our individual life path.n The location at the entry point to the Big Sur Coast of California provides a unique outdoor laboratory in which to study the biology of the bay and the adjacent coastal lands. It is also an area with a deep cultural, literary and artistic history. We will meet marine biologists, experts in the literary history of Cannery Row and the writings of John Steinbeck, local artists and photographers, experts in the neuroscience of creativity, as well as people who are very much involved in the forces and fluxes that steer modern culture. This rich and immersive approach provides students a rare opportunity to reflect on their relationships to nature, culture, and their own individual goals.nThe course emphasizes interactions and discussions. We will be together all of the time, either at our base at the Belden House in Pacific Grove, hiking and camping in Big Sur¿s pristine Big Creek Reserve on the rocky coast, and traveling to the Tassajara Mountain Zen Center in the Ventana wilderness for several days. This is not an ordinary academic experience, instead it is an adventure of a personal, intellectual, spiritual and physical kind. We welcome people with wide interests; artists, poets, writers, engineers, scientists and musicians. Mostly we invite people with an open mind and a sense of adventure. nStudents are expected to have read the several books provided as introductory material before the course begins, and each is also expected to become our local expert in an area such as plant identification, bird identification, poetry, weather prediction, photography, history, ethnography, etc. The course requires an individual research project of your choice on a topic related to the general theme. Final reports will be presented at the last meeting of the group and may involve any medium, including written, oral, and performance media.n Note: This course will be held at the Hopkins Marine Station in the Monterey region, and housing will be provided nearby. Transportation from campus to the housing site will be provided once students arrive to campus on Monday, September 4 (Labor Day). Transportation to campus from the Belden House in Pacific Grove will be provided on Saturday, September 23.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Thompson, S. (PI)

BIO 26S: Maintenance of the Genome

The precious blueprint for life is entrusted to genome maintenance proteins found in all living cells. This seminar introduces the remarkable systems that scan cellular DNA for alterations and make repairs to ensure genomic stability. We further explore how deficiencies in these systems can lead to developmental defects, premature aging, and predisposition to cancer. Course includes background reading from primary articles, introductory lectures, student presentations, and a short term paper. Prerequisites: High school Biology. Preference to Stanford students.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Schwartz, E. (PI)

BIO 51S: The Gene: The History and Science of our Genetic Code

This discussion-based course will use the novel ¿The gene¿ by Siddhartha Mukherjee and other selected readings to explore the science behind our genetic code. We will cover topics such as regulation of gene expression, inheritance, genetic testing, manipulation of the genome, and the relationship between genetics and identity. Prerequisites: Instructor consent, AP Biology Recommended.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Imam, J. (PI)

BIO 198: Directed Reading in Biology

Individually arranged under the supervision of members of the faculty.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

BIO 198X: Out-of-Department Directed Reading

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

BIO 199: Advanced Research Laboratory in Experimental Biology

Individual research taken by arrangement with in-department instructors. See http://biohonors.stanford.edu for information on research sponsors, units, and credit for summer research. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 199X: Out-of-Department Advanced Research Laboratory in Experimental Biology

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Artandi, S. (PI) ; Attardi, L. (PI) ; Barna, M. (PI) ; Barres, B. (PI) ; Beachy, P. (PI) ; Bejerano, G. (PI) ; Bergmann, D. (PI) ; Bhatt, A. (PI) ; Bhutani, N. (PI) ; Block, B. (PI) ; Block, S. (PI) ; Brunet, A. (PI) ; Butte, M. (PI) ; Chang, H. (PI) ; Cheng, A. (PI) ; Chichilnisky, E. (PI) ; Clandinin, T. (PI) ; Clarke, M. (PI) ; Crowder, L. (PI) ; Cullen, M. (PI) ; Cyert, M. (PI) ; Daily, G. (PI) ; Deisseroth, K. (PI) ; Denny, M. (PI) ; Diehn, M. (PI) ; Dirzo, R. (PI) ; Ehrlich, P. (PI) ; Einav, S. (PI) ; Feldman, M. (PI) ; Felsher, D. (PI) ; Fernald, R. (PI) ; Field, C. (PI) ; Fire, A. (PI) ; Fordyce, P. (PI) ; Francis, C. (PI) ; Fraser, H. (PI) ; Frydman, J. (PI) ; Galli, S. (PI) ; Giaccia, A. (PI) ; Gilly, W. (PI) ; Giocomo, L. (PI) ; Gitler, A. (PI) ; Gordon, D. (PI) ; Gozani, O. (PI) ; Graves, E. (PI) ; Gross, E. (PI) ; Gurtner, G. (PI) ; Habtezion, A. (PI) ; Hadly, E. (PI) ; Hallmayer, J. (PI) ; Hanawalt, P. (PI) ; Heller, H. (PI) ; Heller, S. (PI) ; Hestrin, S. (PI) ; Idoyaga, J. (PI) ; Jarosz, D. (PI) ; Jones, P. (PI) ; Kao, P. (PI) ; Khavari, P. (PI) ; Kim, P. (PI) ; Kim, S. (PI) ; Knutson, B. (PI) ; Kopito, R. (PI) ; Kuo, C. (PI) ; Levitt, M. (PI) ; Li, G. (PI) ; Li, J. (PI) ; Lin, M. (PI) ; Lipsick, J. (PI) ; Long, S. (PI) ; Longaker, M. (PI) ; Lowe, C. (PI) ; Luo, L. (PI) ; MacIver, M. (PI) ; Madison, D. (PI) ; Majeti, R. (PI) ; Martinez, O. (PI) ; McConnell, S. (PI) ; Micheli, F. (PI) ; Mignot, E. (PI) ; Monack, D. (PI) ; Monje-Deisseroth, M. (PI) ; Morrison, A. (PI) ; Mudgett, M. (PI) ; Nelson, W. (PI) ; O'Brien, L. (PI) ; O'hara, R. (PI) ; Oghalai, J. (PI) ; Oro, A. (PI) ; Palmer, T. (PI) ; Palumbi, S. (PI) ; Pande, V. (PI) ; Petrov, D. (PI) ; Plant, G. (PI) ; Porteus, M. (PI) ; Prince, D. (PI) ; Puglisi, J. (PI) ; Quertermous, T. (PI) ; Raymond, J. (PI) ; Red-Horse, K. (PI) ; Relman, D. (PI) ; Ricci, A. (PI) ; Rohatgi, R. (PI) ; Sakamoto, K. (PI) ; Sapolsky, R. (PI) ; Schnitzer, M. (PI) ; Shamloo, M. (PI) ; Shatz, C. (PI) ; Shen, K. (PI) ; Shenoy, K. (PI) ; Simon, M. (PI) ; Skotheim, J. (PI) ; Snyder, M. (PI) ; Stearns, T. (PI) ; Steinberg, G. (PI) ; Stevenson, D. (PI) ; Straight, A. (PI) ; Sudhof, T. (PI) ; Thompson, S. (PI) ; Tuljapurkar, S. (PI) ; Vitousek, P. (PI) ; Walbot, V. (PI) ; Wang, K. (PI) ; Weis, W. (PI) ; Weissman, I. (PI) ; Wernig, M. (PI) ; Wu, J. (PI) ; Wu, S. (PI) ; Wyss-Coray, T. (PI) ; Yang, F. (PI) ; Yang, Y. (PI) ; Yang, Y. (PI) ; Zhao, H. (PI)

BIO 274S: Hopkins Microbiology Course (BIOHOPK 274, CEE 274S, ESS 253S)

(Formerly GES 274S.) Four-week, intensive. The interplay between molecular, physiological, ecological, evolutionary, and geochemical processes that constitute, cause, and maintain microbial diversity. How to isolate key microorganisms driving marine biological and geochemical diversity, interpret culture-independent molecular characterization of microbial species, and predict causes and consequences. Laboratory component: what constitutes physiological and metabolic microbial diversity; how evolutionary and ecological processes diversify individual cells into physiologically heterogeneous populations; and the principles of interactions between individuals, their population, and other biological entities in a dynamically changing microbial ecosystem. Prerequisites: CEE 274A and CEE 274B, or equivalents.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3-12 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 290: Teaching of Biology

Open to upper-division undergraduates and graduate students. Practical experience in teaching lab biology or serving as an assistant in a lecture course. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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